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BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | December 31, 1995
John Bosley Hiss, who with his first wife operated the Amy B. Hiss Antique and Gift Shop in Towson for many years, died Dec. 21. He was 104 and lived at Roland Park Place retirement community.The native Baltimorean attended city public schools and graduated from Lehigh University in Bethlehem, Pa., with a degree in civil engineering. He played lacrosse at Lehigh.He served with the Army in World War I and afterward took engineering jobs in Ohio and Connecticut.He and his first wife, the former Amy Louise Beck, operated the antique shop that bore her name.
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By Lisa Kawata | October 25, 2011
There's more cooking at Westwood Unique Furnishings & Antiques than meets the eye. Wander past the antique chests and art deco lamps to the back of the shop, and customers might be surprised to see a large kitchen fully stocked with pots and pans and plenty of spatulas for serving hearty meals. And that's exactly what the kitchen is used for. For the past three years, Westwood's owner, Ingrid Melber, has turned over her shop's large back kitchen to her friend and personal chef, Alba Johnson, on Friday nights for Mediterranean cooking classes.
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NEWS
December 14, 1994
The Carroll County Board of Zoning Appeals has given a Frizzellburg-area couple permission to open an antique shop in a house at 1909 Old Taneytown Road.James and Laura Turner of 1940 Old Taneytown Road plan to open a shop in the building on a part-time basis, but said they may expand to full-time hours.In its decision, the zoning board noted that the building had been used for commercial purposes in the past and that a shop would not negatively affect neighbors.FIRE* Union Bridge: Union Bridge, New Windsor, Hampstead and Taneytown were dispatched to a building fire in the 100 block of Main St. in Union Bridge at 2:01 a.m. yesterday.
BUSINESS
By Marie Gullard and Marie Gullard,Special to The Baltimore Sun | January 31, 2010
Artist John Stevens, who often paints old, historic brick and stone structures, wanted an old house that would reflect his love of watercolors while offering retail space to display them. Ten years ago, Stevens, who has also sold his paintings at craft shows, found just the place - a two-story brick home circa 1850 - on Main Street in the quiet town of Shrewsbury, Pa. "This place is unique in that it was originally built to be a business and residence, and always has been," he said of the property that, over the years, served such commercial endeavors as an ice-cream parlor and antique shop.
NEWS
By Lois Szymanski and Lois Szymanski,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 27, 1997
SILVER IMAGE Antique Shop stands by the traffic light at Washington Road and East Main Street in Westminster. The building, an old home, has a large picture window in the front, which serves as a display case for the antique shop.A pine tree, surrounded by snow and covered with yellow ribbons, is on display. Placed near a soldier's duffel bag under the tree is a sign with bold black letters that reads: "WE PRAY FOR THEM.""We started doing this a few years back for Desert Storm," said Tom Gordon, owner of Silver Image Antique Shop, "and we just kept doing it for the soldiers in Bosnia and all of our troops around the world."
NEWS
By Lisa Respers and Lisa Respers,SUN STAFF | May 8, 1996
The proprietors of a Granite antique shop are hoping to bring back the days of pigtails and inkwells with a reunion for students of the western Baltimore County enclave's old school -- a stone building that now houses their store."
NEWS
November 11, 1990
SYKESVILLE - After several delays, work on transforming the town's historic train depot into a Victorian-style restaurant is scheduled to begin tomorrow.Last week, town administrators and the restaurant developers signed an agreement for a $180,000 state loan the town received for the project, said Town Manager James Schumacher.The project was stalled recently as the town and the developers -- Charles Cullum and Jack Saum -- reworked terms for the loan, which was granted to Sykesville in July from the Maryland Department of Housing and Community Development.
NEWS
September 29, 1996
Terzi, Miller named to posts at bankCharles J. Terzi Jr. has been named vice president and Deborah Greger Miller as assistant vice president by Carroll County Bank and Trust Co.Terzi joined the bank in August as a business development officer for Mason-Dixon Trust Co. He has a bachelor's degree from the University of Baltimore and is a certified corporate trust specialist.Miller is operations manager in the residential lending department of Mason-Dixon Bancshares Mortgage Co., responsible for originations, processing, closing, post-closing and shipping of residential mortgages.
NEWS
March 3, 1993
Historical society antique shop reopensThe county historical society's antique shop reopened this week after a two-month winter hiatus.Housed in a white brick building in Severna Park that once provided the steam for the railroad, the Ann Arrundell County Historical Society collects and sells treasures at the store, one of two county Browse and Buys.The antique store sells donated items as well as taking consignments. All proceeds go to restore old county homes and maintain the historic Benson-Hammond House in Linthicum.
NEWS
By Compiled from the files of the Historical Society of Carroll County | November 5, 1995
50 years agoUnion Mills was visited by a most destructive fire last evening about 8:45 o'clock when the Arthur Hollinger antique shop was completely destroyed. Mr. Hollinger operated an antique shop and employed eight men, and was doing a fine business. Mr. Hollinger and his wife were not home at the time, being in Washington delivering a load of finished antique furniture to his trade and his son was in charge and had left the store earlier in the evening with everything in order. The fire caused much anxiety among the citizens of Union Mills until the firemen arrived zTC for protection.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | December 15, 2009
Diana S. Wimberley, a homemaker and volunteer who had been the owner of a Towson antiques shop, died from cancer Dec. 5 at her Glenarm home. She was 87. Diana Sybil Nutter was born and raised in Kansas City, Mo. After graduation from the Barstow School in 1938, she earned a bachelor's degree in sociology in 1944 from the University of Missouri. She was married in 1942 to Jerry Marion Wimberley, a career Army officer, and after the end of World War II, the couple moved to Vienna, where he had been posted.
NEWS
By Ruma Kumar and Ruma Kumar,SUN REPORTER | March 25, 2007
It was time for Helen Delich Bentley to be honest about the shop. The Cockeysville antiques business the former congresswoman and her husband opened as a labor of love nearly 40 years ago was just labor these days. Dust was collecting on the early 20th century marble-top sideboards in the basement and the Baltimore Potthast cabinets on the second floor. Business hadn't been brisk at Bentley's Antiques Show Mart for years. It was time to close. The first antiques mall in the state is open for one last weekend, closing today at 5 p.m. -- 36 years after it spawned a row of quaint antiques stores in the small quarry town in northern Baltimore County.
NEWS
November 22, 2006
Shirley H. Whitcraft, who worked in real estate sales for more than three decades, died of lung cancer Nov. 15 at the Finksburg home of a daughter. She was 70. Shirley Schmidt was born in Baltimore, raised in Randallstown and was a graduate of Randallstown High School. After earning her real estate license, Mrs. Whitcraft worked in sales for Zelma B. Ensor and in recent years for Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage in Reisterstown. Mrs. Whitcraft enjoyed antiquing and traveling to Atlantic City and Charlestown, W.Va.
NEWS
By Mary Ellen Graybill and Mary Ellen Graybill,Special to The Sun | October 29, 2006
It's a lot of fun," said a freshly coifed Emma Carroll, 88, of life at Glencoe Gardens, as she plans what gown to wear to a meeting of the Daughters of the American Revolution. From the mid-1950s to the late 1980s, she was busy starting up and running an antiques and household furnishings consignment business in the rural, hilly property at 15900 York Road in Sparks. She continues to live in one end of the remodeled barn, an icon to passers-by looking for a good antiques shop. Wiley and Colby Hawks have been renting the space since 1989 for their antiques, decorations and gifts, and expanded to three floors - 6,000 square feet of items ranging from an old waterproof Timex watch for $4.50 to an original painting of the Baltimore harbor at night by Ralph McGuire for $4,900.
NEWS
By STEVE CHAPMAN | March 1, 2006
BERLIN -- It's a Sunday afternoon, and the Potsdamer Platz shopping arcade looks like any American shopping mall on a busy weekend. It's thronged with parents pushing baby strollers, retirees eating ice cream cones and teenagers sneaking kisses. But there is one major difference. The mall has plenty of stores to draw shoppers - Foot Locker, H&M, Eddie Bauer, a discount supermarket and more. But today, absolutely no one is going inside. The reason: The stores are closed. By law, they have to be. Any American merchant would be writhing in agony at the sight of hordes of patrons who are not allowed to buy. But in Germany, this abnormal spectacle is entirely normal.
FEATURES
By KATIE LESLIE and KATIE LESLIE,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 8, 2005
Furniture fanatics have known for years that the Baltimore area is a treasure trove of antiques. With fall's tempered weather, browsing through Baltimore and Ellicott City's antique venues is a perfect weekend activity. "Since Baltimore is the cheapest big city in the East, you can get a deal here if you do it selectively and creatively," said antiquing enthusiast R. Michael Charles, 57, of Baltimore. "I take a lot of walks, and antiquing is something that goes along with it." Whether you're looking for bangles, baubles, bed frames or bookcases, you're sure to find that little, or not so little, something in one of the Baltimore area's many and varied antique stores.
FEATURES
By James G. McCollam and James G. McCollam,Copley News Service | November 18, 1990
Q: What can you tell me about my antique soup tureen with cover and under plate? It is marked with wreath and crown with "Copeland" inside the wreath.A: The mark you describe was used by W. T. Copeland & Co. Ltd. in Stoke, England, in the late 19th century. It would probably sell for $245 to $265 in an antique shop.Q: The attached mark is on the bottom of a teapot that holds about 2 pints. It is decorated with a horse and buggy. There are red bands around the upper and lower part. Can you tell me anything about the vintage, value and origin?
NEWS
By Jodi Bizar and Jodi Bizar,Contributing writer | September 29, 1991
Frustrated with their 9-to-5 jobs, James and Marian Vaught did what a lot of people dream about each day. They quit and became their own bosses.The couple now owns a 161-year-old Victorian house at 710 Edgewood Road in Edgewood, which they run as a bed-and-breakfast inn and antique shop."
NEWS
June 3, 2005
Marian Therese Crowe, who owned and operated an Ellicott City antiques shop, died of an infection Tuesday at Howard County General Hospital. She was 78 and a resident of Ellicott City. The former Marian Therese Healey was born and raised in Baltimore, and was a 1945 graduate of Seton High School. She earned a business degree at the old Mount St. Agnes College in Mount Washington two years later. She worked many years ago as a secretary to a Standard Oil Co. executive. "She would practice her skills at dictation by taking shorthand while listening to the radio," said a son, Patrick H. Crowe of Ellicott City.
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