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By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | July 23, 2012
There are some signs of life on Antique Row. The popular Linden's Deli has relocated to the corner of Howard and Read. And a few doors down, the opulent restaurant space that housed places like Night of the Cookers, Brittons Bar and Grill and Leilani's is back open. It is now called Phaze 10. Phaze 10 is actually “two venues in one,” as it says on its website. Phaze 10 RL&E - short for restaurant, lounge and entertainment - is the big project, a multistory nightlife destination featuring a Southern soul-food menu in the dining room and a steady schedule of live jazz in the lounge.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | July 23, 2012
There are some signs of life on Antique Row. The popular Linden's Deli has relocated to the corner of Howard and Read. And a few doors down, the opulent restaurant space that housed places like Night of the Cookers, Brittons Bar and Grill and Leilani's is back open. It is now called Phaze 10. Phaze 10 is actually “two venues in one,” as it says on its website. Phaze 10 RL&E - short for restaurant, lounge and entertainment - is the big project, a multistory nightlife destination featuring a Southern soul-food menu in the dining room and a steady schedule of live jazz in the lounge.
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NEWS
By Michael James and Michael James,Sun Staff Writer | June 18, 1995
How much can you get for an ornate 19th-century porcelain white elephant statue on Baltimore's historic Antique Row?A felony conviction and up to 15 years in a plain old-fashioned jail.Six antique dealers on this quaint row of Howard Street shops have been charged with buying the elephant and other stolen goods in a recent city police crackdown that has angry merchants in an uproar, virtually rattling the ancient Chinese porcelain bowls on their shelves."They're calling us thieves. That's ridiculous.
BUSINESS
By Hanah Cho, The Baltimore Sun | September 29, 2010
Amos Judd & Son, whose owner sold the store's building on Baltimore's "Antique Row" earlier this year, is merging its operations with Wilson Heritage Lighting in Towson. Jay Judd, 52, the son of owner Jimmy Judd, who recently bought the long-time lamp restoration and vintage lighting store, said Wednesday that the two businesses complement each other. "People who are interested in vintage lighting will be interested in antiques also. It only make sense to have it in one building," said Jay Judd, who had done brass refinishing work for the lighting store for more than 30 years.
NEWS
By Consella A. Lee and Consella A. Lee,Sun Staff Writer | January 25, 1995
You think Glen Burnie, you think car dealers, Motor Vehicle Administration headquarters, strip malls -- but not antique shops.Yet the area around Crain Highway and Baltimore-Annapolis Boulevard is home to six antique and collectible shops, all within four blocks of each other. And most have opened in the past five years.For years, Robert Shenton's B & A Antiques was alone in the 7400 block of Baltimore-Annapolis Blvd.Then Rosie's Past & Present opened in the same block in 1988, followed quickly by the Neatest Little Shop, opened by Sherry Mercer a few doors away a year later.
NEWS
By Frank Lynch and Frank Lynch,Staff Writer | October 4, 1992
Felicia Johnson got into the antiques business quite by accident.Her husband, Andrew, offered her a challenge to "clean out our attic of everything you've collected and I'll take you Europe.""It was a challenge with an outstanding reward," laughed the native New Yorker as she maneuvered her way through the nooks and crannies of her Main Street shop."Besides, I knew I'd find items in Europe to replenish the ones I sold."So, it was off to Cockeysville and Bill Bentley's "Antique Show Mart" where she parted with her treasures.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly | September 23, 1992
Exactly 75 years ago today, a midwife delivered a wailing baby atop a downtown cabinetmaker's shop.That baby is today the dean of downtown's Antique Row and very vocal at the same address, 873-75 N. Howard St. Barr Harris, the proprietor of Harris Auction Galleries, is the man at the microphone and gavel. Raise your hand around him and you've bought a sofa and two chairs.For nearly all his adult life, Harris, who was born Barney but is universally known as Barr, has conducted auction sales along the city's best-known block of antiques, used furniture, uncertain provenances and pedigrees.
NEWS
By Michael James and Michael James,SUN STAFF | October 20, 1995
The slaying of one of their own has left several Antique Row merchants worried about the future of the historic shopping district, troubled in recent years by crime, parking woes and competition from shops in the suburbs."
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,SUN STAFF | July 13, 2001
A company controlled by the family of former strip-club manager Kenneth A. Jackson has bought a three-story building on Baltimore's Antique Row for a restaurant that is to feature international cuisine and guest stints by celebrity chefs. The El Dorado Lounge, which has closed, won't be moving from West Baltimore Street to the Howard Street location, said attorney Lisa Harris Jones, who represents the Jackson family and its business, KAJ Inc. The liquor license for 889 N. Howard St. requires that 40 percent of the establishment's sales be from food, and zoning of the site bans adult entertainment businesses there.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,SUN STAFF | May 9, 1997
From narrow, cluttered shops in Fells Point to boutiques lining Howard Street, Baltimore antique dealers say legislation meant to stop the sale of stolen property could force them to pack up finds like Chinese porcelain and inlaid mahogany tables and leave the city for good.Under a measure expected to come up for a City Council vote Monday, dealers would have to file police reports on all purchases and hold off on reselling them for at least 10 days.That, say longtime antiques dealers, would create a logistics nightmare, unleashing an avalanche of costly paperwork and eating up precious storage space for businesses accustomed to selling pieces almost as fast as they buy them.
BUSINESS
By Edward Gunts | ed.gunts@baltsun.com | February 25, 2010
When Jimmy Judd opened his antiques store on Baltimore's "Antique Row" 34 years ago, he said, he was one of three dozen dealers with shops on the same block, and on many weekends he'd greet patrons from as far away as Virginia, Pennsylvania and Washington. Today there are fewer than a dozen dealers with separate shops in the 800 block of N. Howard St., while others lease stalls inside one multi-tenant location. Still others have retired or opened shops in areas such as Cockeysville, New Market and Savage.
FEATURES
By KATIE LESLIE and KATIE LESLIE,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 8, 2005
Furniture fanatics have known for years that the Baltimore area is a treasure trove of antiques. With fall's tempered weather, browsing through Baltimore and Ellicott City's antique venues is a perfect weekend activity. "Since Baltimore is the cheapest big city in the East, you can get a deal here if you do it selectively and creatively," said antiquing enthusiast R. Michael Charles, 57, of Baltimore. "I take a lot of walks, and antiquing is something that goes along with it." Whether you're looking for bangles, baubles, bed frames or bookcases, you're sure to find that little, or not so little, something in one of the Baltimore area's many and varied antique stores.
NEWS
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 6, 2004
Looking for a men's pinstripe suit that costs less than $50? How about a Winnie the Pooh jack-in-the-box or old X-Men and Green Lantern comics? Perhaps a 50-year-old dining room set is on your need-to-buy list. Whether you're looking for a bargain or a rare item, a good bet is a visit to Antique Row -- a collection of sometimes ramshackle but always interesting shops on York Road, north of Warren Road and south of Ashland Road in Cockeysville. Within a few blocks are more than two dozen antique malls and consignment shops, selling everything from jukeboxes to old photographs.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | May 3, 2004
Catherine M. Judd, the co-owner of a downtown Baltimore antiques business, died of cancer Saturday at Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care. The Roland Park resident was 92. For the past 28 years, Mrs. Judd sat behind a desk at her Howard Street shop, greeted customers on a first-name basis, then conducted lengthy conversations. She was known as the Grande Dame of Antique Row. Born Catherine Mary Leschefsky in Baltimore and raised on East North Avenue, she attended Clifton Park Junior High School.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sarah Schaffer and Sarah Schaffer,SUN STAFF | October 30, 2003
Enjoy the Indian summer and tackle your holiday shopping all at once with a stroll down Baltimore's old Antiques Row. The vintage district, which spans the 800 block of Howard Street, houses dealers who offer a variety of wares, finds and collections. And with more than 20 new vendors setting up shop this weekend, you'll be sure to find one-of-a-kind treasures for everyone on your list. The Antiques Row Stalls, at 809 N. Howard St., is an 8,000-square-foot emporium-style store that opens Saturday.
NEWS
By Sara Engram and Sara Engram,Special to the Sun | May 18, 2003
Whether you're in search of high-end antiques or kitschy collectibles, Kensington is worth a trip. Within an hour's drive of Baltimore, its two distinct antiques districts have become a haven for shops selling everything from elegant French armoires to vintage East Baltimore screen paintings. Kensington began as a railroad community, offering families a chance to escape the sweltering Washington air during the summer months. These days it's a prosperous suburb, and the development of its bustling antiques business during the past three decades has helped preserve some vestiges of its early 20th-century charm.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN STAFF | November 23, 1995
The Baltimore Police Department has opened a substation in the Antique Row-Mount Vernon area, touting it as a way to keep the historic neighborhoods safe for merchants, residents and tourists.Officials insisted that the ribbon-cutting had been planned months before the October slaying of Richard Schocket, a hardware store owner who was shot during a Saturday morning holdup in the heart of the shopping district.But just the same, Tuesday's grand opening may ease fears of nervous merchants who called for more protection after the shooting and complained that potential customers were too nervous to come to their stores.
NEWS
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 6, 2004
Looking for a men's pinstripe suit that costs less than $50? How about a Winnie the Pooh jack-in-the-box or old X-Men and Green Lantern comics? Perhaps a 50-year-old dining room set is on your need-to-buy list. Whether you're looking for a bargain or a rare item, a good bet is a visit to Antique Row -- a collection of sometimes ramshackle but always interesting shops on York Road, north of Warren Road and south of Ashland Road in Cockeysville. Within a few blocks are more than two dozen antique malls and consignment shops, selling everything from jukeboxes to old photographs.
BUSINESS
By Marie Gullard and Marie Gullard,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 24, 2002
It has always been Mark Klatsky's dream to own a villa in Italy, where he could reside six months of the year, investigating and collecting fine works of art. Until such time, however, he revels in the next best thing - his home in The Gardens of Guilford, tucked discreetly behind the Johns Hopkins University in North Baltimore. An apartment building constructed in 1914, the now-converted condominiums capture the feel of a villa, designed in a U-shape and with prominent arched construction, Spanish tiled roof and a manicured courtyard.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,SUN STAFF | July 13, 2001
A company controlled by the family of former strip-club manager Kenneth A. Jackson has bought a three-story building on Baltimore's Antique Row for a restaurant that is to feature international cuisine and guest stints by celebrity chefs. The El Dorado Lounge, which has closed, won't be moving from West Baltimore Street to the Howard Street location, said attorney Lisa Harris Jones, who represents the Jackson family and its business, KAJ Inc. The liquor license for 889 N. Howard St. requires that 40 percent of the establishment's sales be from food, and zoning of the site bans adult entertainment businesses there.
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