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By Newsday | October 27, 1993
Forget everything you ever learned about antipasto. Such as it should come before the meal, or it should be served hot or cold. Or it always includes a slice of salami, a chunk of provolone and an anchovy or two.All that has changed.Antipasti can now be the whole meal. They can be served at room temperature. Any food can go on the antipasto table: meat, cheese, fish, eggs, rice, beans, grains. And always lots and lots of vegetables."Antipasto is perfect for making ahead and serving to company," says Michele Scicolone, whose book "The Antipasto Table" (William Morrow and Co.; $18.95)
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By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Restaurant Critic | September 5, 2004
If anyone has any doubt that Little Italy is keeping up with the times, consider the bread at Ciao Bella, a nice little restaurant steeped in neighborhood tradition. This is simply a spectacular loaf, crisp-crusted and fresh, with plenty of flavor -- a far cry from the tasteless but mildly enjoyable fluff that used to grace every restaurant table in Little Italy. Bravissimo! We didn't end up cheering about everything, though. We had some good food, but we also had some not-so-good food.
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FEATURES
By Linda Lowe Morris | August 11, 1991
If you think of antipasto as that predictable plate of cured meats and sliced cheeses served in Italian restaurants, you have been both deceived and deprived.Michele Scicolone, even though she grew up in an Italian-American household, thought of it this way, too. "Restaurants in America have presented us with that stereotype," she says.But then 20 years ago, on her honeymoon, she and her brand-new husband went to Italy. They went into a small restaurant in Rome and there, off to the side of the dining room, was a huge banquet table spread with platters filled with all kinds of dishes.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and By Elizabeth Large,Sun Restaurant Critic | April 21, 2002
Luigi Petti is something of a new kid on the block as far as Little Italy restaurants go. It's been open a dozen years, which is an eternity compared with most restaurants. But Little Italy seems to be the exception; Baltimore institutions like Sabatino's, Velleggia's and Chiapparelli's, along with many other old-timers, still hold sway there. When Luigi Petti first opened, it must have seemed quite daring, with the main dining room's black and pink supper-club look. Even now it's the only restaurant in the neighborhood that has a multilevel, plant-filled deck for al fresco dining.
FEATURES
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,LOS ANGELES TIMES SYNDICATE | June 7, 1998
It always pleases me to meet young people who have an interest in food, as my own career was sparked by a year of study in France when I was in college. Several weeks ago, I received a phone call from an Amherst College senior who told me of a new gourmet club that she and other students had founded at the school."Would you be willing to give the group a cooking class?" she asked. We agreed on a date, and on the day of the lesson eight enthusiastic beginning cooks appeared at my door.Their ardor never waned during the three-hour session in which we prepared a simple Italian-inspired meal.
FEATURES
By Mary Maushard | February 14, 1991
When most people think about dining in Annapolis, they picture water views and Midshipmen, early American dining rooms and contemporary American watering holes.I'm willing to bet a crab claw they don't think of Fred's.Fred's is a regular place on Solomons Island Road in what used to be the heart of Parole, miles from the City Dock. It is a comfortable restaurant, with a fairly informal crowd and a menu that mixes its Italian heritage with its surroundings. That means lots of seafood lots of ways.
NEWS
By Elaine Tassy and Elaine Tassy,SUN STAFF | April 17, 1997
Whopping portions of nicely seasoned entrees, hot crusty bread and a waterfront location make a meal at Vespucci's in the old Harbour House building on the City Dock in Annapolis worth trying.But service problems, dismal decor and disastrous desserts led my dining companion, Lisa Antonia Ranghelli, a 31-year-old Washington professional woman, and me to agree the eatery is a wanna-be elegant restaurant serving food that lacks oomph and doesn't merit the high prices.The restaurant has a more moderately priced bistro on the lower level and another on the outside dining deck, but we opted for the swankier upstairs room, a darkly decorated setting that had the feel of a hotel dining room and operalike background music that was cloying and unnecessary.
FEATURES
By Bruce Friedland | September 28, 1991
Baltimore and Annapolis Boulevard in Severna Park across from Dawson's. Hours: 10:30 a.m. to 9:30 p.m. Mondays to Thursdays; 10:30 a.m. to 10 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays; 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. Sundays. Call 544-1416.In addition to fruits and vegetables, whole-grain breads and low-fat dairy products, any sensible diet, in my estimation, must include the fifth basic food group, the cheese steak sub.We're talking steaming hot chopped steak from the grill, smothered with fried onions, dripping with provolone, dressed with sweet and hot peppers, lettuce, tomato, mayonnaise and oil and vinegar, all on a sub roll whose sole function is to hold everything together without getting in the way.Jeno's Steaks has such a sandwich, in the grand and geographically correct tradition of "south Philly."
FEATURES
By Mary Maushard | October 4, 1990
The big news at Squire's, a pasta and pizza place in Dundalk, is that Bunky's Body Shop is being demolished so that Squire's can expand.Small wonder. On a recent Saturday night, Squire's two floors were nearly full.Small wonder. The food is good, the portions are big, the prices are low. For families on a budget or folks who want a tasty meal without a lot of hoopla, this is the place. Add to that one of the best cannoli my husband and I could recall having and you have Squire's, a small wonder.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Restaurant Critic | September 5, 2004
If anyone has any doubt that Little Italy is keeping up with the times, consider the bread at Ciao Bella, a nice little restaurant steeped in neighborhood tradition. This is simply a spectacular loaf, crisp-crusted and fresh, with plenty of flavor -- a far cry from the tasteless but mildly enjoyable fluff that used to grace every restaurant table in Little Italy. Bravissimo! We didn't end up cheering about everything, though. We had some good food, but we also had some not-so-good food.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Restaurant Critic | October 24, 1999
It always surprises me that Columbia doesn't have more nice restaurants. (I'm not counting chains.) There's a huge, affluent and fairly sophisticated customer base there. Who knows? Maybe that's why Piccolo's was packed on a Wednesday night.Or maybe it was the return of chef Michael Wagner, who was in charge of Piccolo's kitchen for three years, developed a following and then left to open Planet Hollywood. He moved on to the Tomato Palace in Columbia and is now back at Piccolo's, with a new menu of contemporary Italian cuisine.
FEATURES
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,LOS ANGELES TIMES SYNDICATE | June 7, 1998
It always pleases me to meet young people who have an interest in food, as my own career was sparked by a year of study in France when I was in college. Several weeks ago, I received a phone call from an Amherst College senior who told me of a new gourmet club that she and other students had founded at the school."Would you be willing to give the group a cooking class?" she asked. We agreed on a date, and on the day of the lesson eight enthusiastic beginning cooks appeared at my door.Their ardor never waned during the three-hour session in which we prepared a simple Italian-inspired meal.
NEWS
By Elaine Tassy and Elaine Tassy,SUN STAFF | April 17, 1997
Whopping portions of nicely seasoned entrees, hot crusty bread and a waterfront location make a meal at Vespucci's in the old Harbour House building on the City Dock in Annapolis worth trying.But service problems, dismal decor and disastrous desserts led my dining companion, Lisa Antonia Ranghelli, a 31-year-old Washington professional woman, and me to agree the eatery is a wanna-be elegant restaurant serving food that lacks oomph and doesn't merit the high prices.The restaurant has a more moderately priced bistro on the lower level and another on the outside dining deck, but we opted for the swankier upstairs room, a darkly decorated setting that had the feel of a hotel dining room and operalike background music that was cloying and unnecessary.
FEATURES
By Newsday | October 27, 1993
Forget everything you ever learned about antipasto. Such as it should come before the meal, or it should be served hot or cold. Or it always includes a slice of salami, a chunk of provolone and an anchovy or two.All that has changed.Antipasti can now be the whole meal. They can be served at room temperature. Any food can go on the antipasto table: meat, cheese, fish, eggs, rice, beans, grains. And always lots and lots of vegetables."Antipasto is perfect for making ahead and serving to company," says Michele Scicolone, whose book "The Antipasto Table" (William Morrow and Co.; $18.95)
FEATURES
By ELIZABETH LARGE | November 15, 1992
Champagne Tony's, 1006 Light St., (410) 685-8822. Open Tuesdays to Sundays, closed Mondays. MC, V. No-smoking area: no. Wheelchair accessible: no.You can't get a bottle of champagne at Champagne Tony's, at least you couldn't when I ate there. You'll have to settle for red snapper and crab in a buerre blanc or pollo saltimbocca. Actually, that's not quite true: The restaurant, which doesn't have a liquor license, has an agreement with a nearby bar. It will deliver a bottle of wine from an extremely limited list.
FEATURES
By Bruce Friedland | September 28, 1991
Baltimore and Annapolis Boulevard in Severna Park across from Dawson's. Hours: 10:30 a.m. to 9:30 p.m. Mondays to Thursdays; 10:30 a.m. to 10 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays; 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. Sundays. Call 544-1416.In addition to fruits and vegetables, whole-grain breads and low-fat dairy products, any sensible diet, in my estimation, must include the fifth basic food group, the cheese steak sub.We're talking steaming hot chopped steak from the grill, smothered with fried onions, dripping with provolone, dressed with sweet and hot peppers, lettuce, tomato, mayonnaise and oil and vinegar, all on a sub roll whose sole function is to hold everything together without getting in the way.Jeno's Steaks has such a sandwich, in the grand and geographically correct tradition of "south Philly."
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Restaurant Critic | October 24, 1999
It always surprises me that Columbia doesn't have more nice restaurants. (I'm not counting chains.) There's a huge, affluent and fairly sophisticated customer base there. Who knows? Maybe that's why Piccolo's was packed on a Wednesday night.Or maybe it was the return of chef Michael Wagner, who was in charge of Piccolo's kitchen for three years, developed a following and then left to open Planet Hollywood. He moved on to the Tomato Palace in Columbia and is now back at Piccolo's, with a new menu of contemporary Italian cuisine.
FEATURES
By ELIZABETH LARGE | November 15, 1992
Champagne Tony's, 1006 Light St., (410) 685-8822. Open Tuesdays to Sundays, closed Mondays. MC, V. No-smoking area: no. Wheelchair accessible: no.You can't get a bottle of champagne at Champagne Tony's, at least you couldn't when I ate there. You'll have to settle for red snapper and crab in a buerre blanc or pollo saltimbocca. Actually, that's not quite true: The restaurant, which doesn't have a liquor license, has an agreement with a nearby bar. It will deliver a bottle of wine from an extremely limited list.
FEATURES
By Linda Lowe Morris | August 11, 1991
In her book "The Antipasto Table," Michelle Scicolone created a menu of antipasto dishes to be served as a buffet supper for a crowd. The menu is based around a seafood salad made with pesto, a perfect way to enjoy the fresh basil now in season."
FEATURES
By Linda Lowe Morris | August 11, 1991
If you think of antipasto as that predictable plate of cured meats and sliced cheeses served in Italian restaurants, you have been both deceived and deprived.Michele Scicolone, even though she grew up in an Italian-American household, thought of it this way, too. "Restaurants in America have presented us with that stereotype," she says.But then 20 years ago, on her honeymoon, she and her brand-new husband went to Italy. They went into a small restaurant in Rome and there, off to the side of the dining room, was a huge banquet table spread with platters filled with all kinds of dishes.
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