Advertisement
HomeCollectionsAntigua
IN THE NEWS

Antigua

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Kimberly A.C. Wilson and Kimberly A.C. Wilson,SUN STAFF | November 4, 2002
ST. JOHN'S, Antigua - When John Allen Muhammad snatched his three young children in Tacoma, Wash., and fled a custody order 4,000 miles to the twin-island nation of Antigua and Barbuda, he landed on an atoll in flux. The year was 2000, and the U.S. Treasury Department had just lifted an advisory that warned Americans to take precautions when investing there, even as the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development called the former British colony a tax haven on the order of the Cayman Islands, Panama and Lebanon.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
By Denise Weiss | July 30, 2013
Welcome to part one of the shocking two-part season finale of "The Bachelorette," which, of course, Chris Harrison calls the "television event of the summer. " It better be good because most of the show's viewers would rather have root canal than sit through another boring week with Des, Brooks, Chris and Drew. Sorry rose lovers, but you better bring on the novocaine because there is still one week to go before we find out if Des lives happily ever after or if she pulls a Mr. Chow and tells them all “so long gay boys.” It seems like years ago that drunk Jonathan tried to persuade Des into the fantasy suite straight out of the limo on night one. Since the beginning, there have been speculations that a significant number of the eligible bachelors are not here for the “right reasons” because they are in fact gay. For a season full of men, there have been lots of tears, emotions, cat fights and PMS.  As we walk down memory lane, we visit the ghosts of Des' rejects; Diogo's failed suit of armor, sexy Juan Pablo, Brian's crazy girlfriend, lots of men with emotional issues and a federal prosecutor who has his mom on speed dial.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
By Laurie Willis and Laurie Willis,SUN STAFF | May 10, 2003
Robert W. Fischer, president of Northwest Hospital Center for 17 years, resigned this week to become chief executive officer of a new hospital in Antigua that's expected to open by January. Fischer, 61, said the decision to leave Northwest was one of the toughest of his life. "I have to tell you, my heart will always be there," Fischer said yesterday. "I have mixed emotions about leaving." Fischer, who has a master's degree in health care administration from the University of Michigan, said he wasn't looking to leave the Randallstown hospital when he got an unexpected call from Antigua.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | July 11, 2012
Jeanette Elizabeth Aska, a Baltimore City high school biology and physics teacher, died of lung cancer July 3 at Seasons Hospice at Northwest Hospital. The Owings Mills resident was 60. Born on St. John's, Antigua, she was a 1970 graduate of Charlotte Amalie High School at St. Thomas, Virgin Islands. She studied at Blackburn College in Illinois and in 1976 she earned a bachelor's degree from Morgan State University. She also had a master's degree in education from Goucher College. In 1979, she joined the Baltimore City's public schools and taught at Lombard Middle School, Southwestern High School and Edmondson-Westside High School, where she had been senior class adviser in 1992 and 1999.
NEWS
By Kimberly A.C. Wilson and Kimberly A.C. Wilson,SUN STAFF | November 3, 2002
ST. JOHN'S, Antigua - An Antiguan task force said yesterday that sniper suspect John Allen Muhammad entered the Caribbean nation in March 2000 using a Wyoming driver's license bearing a false name, Thomas Alan Lee, apparently one of numerous false identities he used during 16 months on the island. Attorney General Gertel U. Thom, who released the three-page preliminary report of the task force looking into Muhammad's activities, said he may have helped produce forged documents for other people.
NEWS
By William Thompson and William Thompson,Sun Staff Correspondent | February 10, 1994
ST. JOHN'S, Antigua -- Nobody here wants to talk to strangers about the yacht that was towed into the harbor 10 days ago with four cadavers aboard, seated as they were when they were murdered -- an American couple and two English crewmen.This is the height of the tourist season. Images are important.The England vs. Leeward Islands cricket matches. The harbors that attract some of the world's most expensive sailing yachts. The hundreds of soft, white-sand beaches.Those are the images they want.
NEWS
By Carla Hayden | February 19, 1995
...The works of Jamaica Kincaid - beginning with her first book, "At the Bottom of the River," then "Annie John," a coming-of-age tale set in Antigua, to her last novel, "Lucy," which chronicles the experiences of a teen-ager from the West Indies. Kincaid's books have a lyrical quality that captures the imagination and evokes the author's Caribbean background. I've found the recurring themes of self-discovery and growth particularly interesting and am impressed with the writer's ability to convey the majesty and power of nature.
NEWS
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN STAFF | October 5, 1997
"My Brother," by Jamaica Kincaid. Farrar, Straus & Giroux. 193 pages. $21.Antigua-born novelist Jamaica Kincaid has earned an enviable reputation as a writer of lucid, tantalizing prose that nevertheless manages to conceal as much as it reveals. This elegantly wrought memoir, which recounts her younger brother's death from AIDS, is a tragic meditation on the unknowable in oneself and others.The book opens with Kincaid returning to Antigua to visit her brother in his hospital room. He has never left the island, as she has, and when she arrives he is pitifully emaciated and fading fast.
NEWS
July 1, 1999
Samdach Vira Bhante, 110, a Cambodian monk who attained the highest spiritual status in Buddhism and advised leaders of Cambodia and India, died Saturday in Stockton, Calif. He served as a spiritual adviser to Cambodia's King Norodom Sihanouk and kept watch at the deathbed of India's first prime minister, Jawaharlal Nehru.Brian O'Hara, 58, former singer and guitarist with the Fourmost, a 1960s Liverpool group that shared a manager with the Beatles and had hits with songs written by John Lennon and Paul McCartney, was found hanged Sunday at his home in the Wavertree area of the northern England port city, police said.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | July 11, 2012
Jeanette Elizabeth Aska, a Baltimore City high school biology and physics teacher, died of lung cancer July 3 at Seasons Hospice at Northwest Hospital. The Owings Mills resident was 60. Born on St. John's, Antigua, she was a 1970 graduate of Charlotte Amalie High School at St. Thomas, Virgin Islands. She studied at Blackburn College in Illinois and in 1976 she earned a bachelor's degree from Morgan State University. She also had a master's degree in education from Goucher College. In 1979, she joined the Baltimore City's public schools and taught at Lombard Middle School, Southwestern High School and Edmondson-Westside High School, where she had been senior class adviser in 1992 and 1999.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Evan Siple | March 12, 2012
Hampden's Alchemy may have one of the tiniest upstairs bars in Baltimore. But there are some serious, high-end cocktails being crafted in this small space. Dubbed "Potions" (see what they did there?), the cocktail menu features an extensive selection of hand-crafted and tweaked blends of traditional drinks that demonstrate a lot of care, craftsmanship and, best of all, lots of flavor. "It's fun, I love doing it. We find what's trending and give it our own twist," said bartender Matthew Ballinger.
SPORTS
February 10, 2012
The U.S. men's national soccer team will play Brazil in a May 30 friendly at FedEx Field in Landover, the five-time World Cup champion's first visit to the Washington area since 1998 and the Americans' debut at the Redskins' stadium. The game will begin at 8 p.m. with TV coverage on ESPN2 and Univision. Tickets, ranging from $40 to $135, will go on sale next Friday via Ticketmaster and ussoccer.com. D.C. United's full-season ticket holders will receive advanced access. The United States has defeated Brazil once in 16 meetings, the victory coming in a 1998 Gold Cup match in Los Angeles.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | July 10, 2011
Wayne Smith is standing at the Weber gas grill in Clifton Park brushing barbecue sauce over a batch of jerk chicken — a Caribbean signature dish in a weekend of cultural signatures at the 30th annual Caribbean Carnival Festival. He's at the edge of a circle of vendors, but the jerk cookery puts him at the center of the spirit of things on the first day of the two-day festival. It's about 2 p.m. in full sun with a temperature about 90 away from the grill, so who knows how hot it is right here where he's working in back of the Wat U Makin Jamaican stand, where they figured on selling about 100 pounds of chicken this weekend?
TRAVEL
By Special to the Sun | October 3, 2004
A Memorable Place A worried father warms to Guatemala By Doug Bruns SPECIAL TO THE SUN When our daughter, a college sophomore, asked to go to Guatemala for a semester's study and volunteer work, my wife and I were somewhat concerned. Central America lingers in our North American consciousness as a troublesome area, despite the wonderful advances places such as Belize and Costa Rica have experienced. So, being the dutiful father, I joined my daughter for a week to get the lay of the land.
NEWS
By Stephen Kiehl and Andrea F. Siegel and Stephen Kiehl and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | September 28, 2003
Long before John Allen Muhammad and Lee Boyd Malvo were accused of teaming up to carry out an insidious killing rampage that left 13 dead, their relationship began with an unusual trade on a small Caribbean island. Malvo's mother, desperate to leave Antigua and reach the United States but unable to pay for the forged travel documents needed to get there, offered her son to Muhammad as collateral. The money, she promised, would come later. Muhammad took the deal - and held onto the boy. "She didn't pay him in full for the documents," said John Fuller, an Antiguan lawyer who investigated Muhammad and Malvo's dealings on the island for the attorney general there.
BUSINESS
By Laurie Willis and Laurie Willis,SUN STAFF | May 10, 2003
Robert W. Fischer, president of Northwest Hospital Center for 17 years, resigned this week to become chief executive officer of a new hospital in Antigua that's expected to open by January. Fischer, 61, said the decision to leave Northwest was one of the toughest of his life. "I have to tell you, my heart will always be there," Fischer said yesterday. "I have mixed emotions about leaving." Fischer, who has a master's degree in health care administration from the University of Michigan, said he wasn't looking to leave the Randallstown hospital when he got an unexpected call from Antigua.
TRAVEL
By Special to the Sun | October 3, 2004
A Memorable Place A worried father warms to Guatemala By Doug Bruns SPECIAL TO THE SUN When our daughter, a college sophomore, asked to go to Guatemala for a semester's study and volunteer work, my wife and I were somewhat concerned. Central America lingers in our North American consciousness as a troublesome area, despite the wonderful advances places such as Belize and Costa Rica have experienced. So, being the dutiful father, I joined my daughter for a week to get the lay of the land.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | July 10, 2011
Wayne Smith is standing at the Weber gas grill in Clifton Park brushing barbecue sauce over a batch of jerk chicken — a Caribbean signature dish in a weekend of cultural signatures at the 30th annual Caribbean Carnival Festival. He's at the edge of a circle of vendors, but the jerk cookery puts him at the center of the spirit of things on the first day of the two-day festival. It's about 2 p.m. in full sun with a temperature about 90 away from the grill, so who knows how hot it is right here where he's working in back of the Wat U Makin Jamaican stand, where they figured on selling about 100 pounds of chicken this weekend?
NEWS
By Kimberly A.C. Wilson and Kimberly A.C. Wilson,SUN STAFF | November 4, 2002
ST. JOHN'S, Antigua - When John Allen Muhammad snatched his three young children in Tacoma, Wash., and fled a custody order 4,000 miles to the twin-island nation of Antigua and Barbuda, he landed on an atoll in flux. The year was 2000, and the U.S. Treasury Department had just lifted an advisory that warned Americans to take precautions when investing there, even as the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development called the former British colony a tax haven on the order of the Cayman Islands, Panama and Lebanon.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.