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Antietam National Battlefield

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By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | April 7, 2011
Antietam National Battlefield is one of my favorite Civil War sites, even though it appears my ancestor missed this fight, the bloodiest day of any battles in the war. About 23,000 soldiers were killed, wounded or went missing on Sept. 17, 1862, after 12 hours of savage fighting between Union and Confederate armies in the town of Sharpsburg in Western Maryland. The battle ended Robert E. Lee's first invasion of the North, forcing the Confederate troops back across the Potomac River into Virginia.
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BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | March 3, 2014
Almost 7 million people visited national parks in Maryland in 2012, generating some $217.2 million in spending and 2,770 jobs, according to the National Park Service. In Baltimore, Fort McHenry National Monument and Shrine drew more than 744,000 visitors, who spent about $40 million and sustained about 526 jobs. About 625,024 of the visitors were non-local, representing about $38.2 million, according to the new peer-reviewed report, which measures spending within a 60-mile radius of a park.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Randi Kest | October 23, 1997
History and fashionImprove your fashion sense while learning the history of the wardrobe at the Philadelphia Museum of Art during the "Best Dressed: A Celebration of Style" exhibit. Being held until Jan. 4, 1998, this celebration of fashion from over the globe features more than 200 objects from the 18th, 19th and 20th centuries. Included in the exhibit is the 1956 wedding gown of Princess Grace of Monaco, a complete Japanese geisha's costume and several dresses from the 1860s and 1880s by Charles Frederick Worth, the father of French couture.
NEWS
By Bob Allen, For The Baltimore Sun | September 24, 2013
The Civil War experience has been preserved over the past 150 years through a variety of media: books, newspaper accounts, films, drawings, paintings, diaries ... and fabrics. Columbia resident Mavis Slawson has made the latter her specialty as a textile historian and docent at the National Museum of Civil War Medicine in Frederick. She often gives presentations about the role of textiles in the Civil War, examining their role not only as practical materials but also in conveying and preserving culture across the battlefield.
BUSINESS
By Michelle Deal-Zimmerman and Michelle Deal-Zimmerman,Michelle.deal@baltsun.com | August 15, 2009
This is it, people. Last chance for free admission to national parks like Assateague Island National Seashore, Antietam National Battlefield, Fort McHenry National Monument and 147 other parks that charge an entrance fee. (Some 250 others are already free.) President Barack Obama and his family are taking advantage of the freebie with a visit this weekend to the Grand Canyon and Yellowstone Park. Spokesman Robert Gibbs said the trip is meant to encourage people to visit the national park system.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karin Remesch | July 1, 1999
'Salute to Independence'Join the Maryland Symphony Orchestra and music director Elizabeth Schulze for the 14th Annual Salute to Independence on Saturday at Antietam National Battlefield in Sharpsburg. Patriotic music includes John Williams' "Star Wars Medley" and Gould's "American Salute." The Maryland Army National Guard, B Battalion, provides cannon fire during Tchaikovsky's "1812 Overture." The concert concludes with fireworks to Sousa's "Stars and Stripes Forever."A military fly-over precedes the concert.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karin Remesch | December 18, 1997
Civil War ChristmasLearn about Christmas customs and traditions popular during the Civil War at a slide presentation tomorrow evening at the Antietam National Battlefield's visitor center in Sharpsburg. A "Civil War Christmas" also includes music, refreshments and a visit by Santa Claus. And meet Kevin Rawlings, a living history volunteer, who will provide an impression of a Civil War-era Santa and then autograph copies of his book, "We Were Marching on Christmas Day, A History and Chronicle of Christmas Day during the Civil War."
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown and Matthew Hay Brown,Sun reporter | March 14, 2008
ANTIETAM NATIONAL BATTLEFIELD -- Rocky Rosacker stood on the southern side of the Sunken Road - ground held by Confederate troops at the outset of the bloodiest day in American history. The yellow-green fields to the north that September morning in 1862 were Union territory. The Annapolis man opened his arms wide, conjuring ghost armies in blue and gray. "This is what Lee saw," said Rosacker, himself a combat veteran of the Marine Corps. "This is what Longstreet saw. This is what those guys faced.
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | March 3, 2014
Almost 7 million people visited national parks in Maryland in 2012, generating some $217.2 million in spending and 2,770 jobs, according to the National Park Service. In Baltimore, Fort McHenry National Monument and Shrine drew more than 744,000 visitors, who spent about $40 million and sustained about 526 jobs. About 625,024 of the visitors were non-local, representing about $38.2 million, according to the new peer-reviewed report, which measures spending within a 60-mile radius of a park.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | September 13, 2012
The argument over the performance of the Union commander on the nation's bloodiest day is far from settled. Major Gen. George B. McClellan was sacked by President Abraham Lincoln less than two months after the Battle of Antietam. For more than a century, Civil War historians have written off his conduct of the battle as slow, poorly coordinated and a waste of a 2-1 numerical advantage. But visitors taking a guided tour of the Antietam National Battlefield these days are likely to hear a more nuanced appraisal of McClellan.
NEWS
By Clare Lochary, For The Baltimore Sun | October 1, 2012
The simple act of going for a walk becomes an adventure when the weather turns crisp and Mid-Atlantic trees change color. Check out these area hiking trails to get a breath of fresh air, to commune with nature and to get a glimpse of our region's rich history. Between the Atlantic marshes and the peaks of the Appalachian Trail, there are hikes suited to everyone from beginners to experienced campers. You can flee city life for the untamed wilds of West Virginia. You can take a walk into the past to commemorate the 150th anniversary of the Battle of Antietam.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | September 13, 2012
The argument over the performance of the Union commander on the nation's bloodiest day is far from settled. Major Gen. George B. McClellan was sacked by President Abraham Lincoln less than two months after the Battle of Antietam. For more than a century, Civil War historians have written off his conduct of the battle as slow, poorly coordinated and a waste of a 2-1 numerical advantage. But visitors taking a guided tour of the Antietam National Battlefield these days are likely to hear a more nuanced appraisal of McClellan.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | April 7, 2011
Antietam National Battlefield is one of my favorite Civil War sites, even though it appears my ancestor missed this fight, the bloodiest day of any battles in the war. About 23,000 soldiers were killed, wounded or went missing on Sept. 17, 1862, after 12 hours of savage fighting between Union and Confederate armies in the town of Sharpsburg in Western Maryland. The battle ended Robert E. Lee's first invasion of the North, forcing the Confederate troops back across the Potomac River into Virginia.
BUSINESS
By Michelle Deal-Zimmerman and Michelle Deal-Zimmerman,Michelle.deal@baltsun.com | August 15, 2009
This is it, people. Last chance for free admission to national parks like Assateague Island National Seashore, Antietam National Battlefield, Fort McHenry National Monument and 147 other parks that charge an entrance fee. (Some 250 others are already free.) President Barack Obama and his family are taking advantage of the freebie with a visit this weekend to the Grand Canyon and Yellowstone Park. Spokesman Robert Gibbs said the trip is meant to encourage people to visit the national park system.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown and Matthew Hay Brown,Sun reporter | March 14, 2008
ANTIETAM NATIONAL BATTLEFIELD -- Rocky Rosacker stood on the southern side of the Sunken Road - ground held by Confederate troops at the outset of the bloodiest day in American history. The yellow-green fields to the north that September morning in 1862 were Union territory. The Annapolis man opened his arms wide, conjuring ghost armies in blue and gray. "This is what Lee saw," said Rosacker, himself a combat veteran of the Marine Corps. "This is what Longstreet saw. This is what those guys faced.
NEWS
By BRADLEY OLSON and BRADLEY OLSON,SUN REPORTER | June 11, 2006
Sharpsburg -- Calling themselves the "ghosts of the Confederacy," white supremacists from several groups held a rally at Antietam National Battlefield yesterday, the first time any group has been permitted to demonstrate at the site of the bloodiest day of the Civil War. About 30 men, women and children gathered at what was a family farm at the time of the battle to commemorate their "forefathers" who "fought for our liberty as white men," said Gordon...
NEWS
September 12, 1997
SHARPSBURG -- The Richard King Mellon Foundation announced yesterday that it is donating 11.6 acres to the National Park Service at the Antietam National Battlefield.The land, within the boundaries of the Civil War battlefield, had been subdivided into three building lots when it was purchased for donation to the park.The Pittsburgh-based foundation has made several other gifts of historic land to the park service at Antietam, which this weekend will mark the 135th anniversary of the battle -- the bloodiest day in U.S. warfare, which ended with more than 23,000 Union and Confederate troops killed, wounded or missing.
NEWS
By Bob Allen, For The Baltimore Sun | September 24, 2013
The Civil War experience has been preserved over the past 150 years through a variety of media: books, newspaper accounts, films, drawings, paintings, diaries ... and fabrics. Columbia resident Mavis Slawson has made the latter her specialty as a textile historian and docent at the National Museum of Civil War Medicine in Frederick. She often gives presentations about the role of textiles in the Civil War, examining their role not only as practical materials but also in conveying and preserving culture across the battlefield.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karin Remesch | September 13, 2001
History comes alive in Sharpsburg this week when Rebels and Yankees march through the town in observance of the 139th anniversary of the Battle of Antietam - the Civil War's bloodiest day. Civil War events will be commemorated along the streets and byways of the town and at nearby Antietam National Battlefield. Beginning today and continuing through Monday, activities at the battlefield include lectures, ranger-led hikes and living history events. (Saturday's battlefield torchlight tour is filled)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karin Remesch | July 1, 1999
'Salute to Independence'Join the Maryland Symphony Orchestra and music director Elizabeth Schulze for the 14th Annual Salute to Independence on Saturday at Antietam National Battlefield in Sharpsburg. Patriotic music includes John Williams' "Star Wars Medley" and Gould's "American Salute." The Maryland Army National Guard, B Battalion, provides cannon fire during Tchaikovsky's "1812 Overture." The concert concludes with fireworks to Sousa's "Stars and Stripes Forever."A military fly-over precedes the concert.
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