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NEWS
By Joel McCord and Joel McCord,SUN STAFF | February 14, 2002
HAGERSTOWN - Downstream communities fretted yesterday over the effect on their drinking water supplies of about 20 million gallons of sewage that have spilled from a Hagerstown treatment plant since Saturday. Meanwhile, Hagerstown public works officials scrambled to get their disabled sewage treatment plant, which discharges into a Potomac River tributary, back in full operation. Brunswick, the first community downstream that draws drinking water from the river, closed its Antietam Creek intake pipes about 11 p.m. Tuesday "as a precautionary measure," said Kevin Brawner, the Frederick County town's director of public facilities.
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NEWS
September 17, 2012
One hundred fifty years ago today, two great armies clashed in a titanic struggle that would decide the fate of a nation. "Around a cornfield and a little white Dunker church, around a stone bridge and in a pasture lane worn by cow paths, surged a human tornado," wrote Carl Sandburg many years later. Never before or since has such a deadly concentration of firepower been unleashed on the American continent. The Battle of Antietam, waged across a meandering stream called Antietam Creek in Western Maryland near Hagerstown, was the first great turning point of the American Civil War and the bloodiest single day of combat ever waged on U.S. soil.
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NEWS
By Chris Guy and Chris Guy,SUN STAFF | November 20, 2004
A Washington-based environmental group says Hagerstown's sewage treatment plant is routinely dumping raw waste into Antietam Creek, and the organization is threatening to sue unless the city corrects "chronic environmental violations." In the past four years, the plant has dumped millions of gallons of raw sewage and partially treated wastewater into the creek, a major tributary of the Potomac River, according to the group Potomac Riverkeeper. The four-year-old nonprofit organization, which monitors the 383-mile river and its 14,000-acre watershed, says records from 2000 to this year show that the plant repeatedly exceeded its discharge limits.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | September 13, 2012
The argument over the performance of the Union commander on the nation's bloodiest day is far from settled. Major Gen. George B. McClellan was sacked by President Abraham Lincoln less than two months after the Battle of Antietam. For more than a century, Civil War historians have written off his conduct of the battle as slow, poorly coordinated and a waste of a 2-1 numerical advantage. But visitors taking a guided tour of the Antietam National Battlefield these days are likely to hear a more nuanced appraisal of McClellan.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Baltimore Sun reporter | April 28, 2011
The powerful cold front that spawned deadly and destructive tornadoes across the South this week passed through Maryland Thursday with more than a dozen tornado warnings. But in the end there were no reports of catastrophic damage. Survey teams from the National Weather Service's Sterling, Va., forecast office were dispatched Thursday to the Shenandoah Valley and to Loudon County in Virginia, and to Frederick County in Maryland to look for any damage indicating that tornadoes had touched down.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | September 13, 2012
The argument over the performance of the Union commander on the nation's bloodiest day is far from settled. Major Gen. George B. McClellan was sacked by President Abraham Lincoln less than two months after the Battle of Antietam. For more than a century, Civil War historians have written off his conduct of the battle as slow, poorly coordinated and a waste of a 2-1 numerical advantage. But visitors taking a guided tour of the Antietam National Battlefield these days are likely to hear a more nuanced appraisal of McClellan.
NEWS
September 17, 2012
One hundred fifty years ago today, two great armies clashed in a titanic struggle that would decide the fate of a nation. "Around a cornfield and a little white Dunker church, around a stone bridge and in a pasture lane worn by cow paths, surged a human tornado," wrote Carl Sandburg many years later. Never before or since has such a deadly concentration of firepower been unleashed on the American continent. The Battle of Antietam, waged across a meandering stream called Antietam Creek in Western Maryland near Hagerstown, was the first great turning point of the American Civil War and the bloodiest single day of combat ever waged on U.S. soil.
NEWS
March 20, 2010
The National Park Service says some boat ramps and campgrounds along the Chesapeake & Ohio Canal remain closed by debris from Potomac River flooding early in the week. Rangers said Friday that nine boat ramps from Spring Gap in Allegany County to Edward's Ferry in Montgomery County are closed. The Antietam Creek and McCoy's Ferry campgrounds are also closed, along with the Billy Goat Trail near Great Falls. Park visitors should expect rough conditions along much of the towpath. - Associated Press
NEWS
February 13, 2002
In Montgomery County School board unanimous in seeking MSPAP halt ROCKVILLE - The Montgomery County school board voted unanimously yesterday to ask the state school board and state superintendent to halt Maryland's elementary and middle school testing program until it's changed to give pupils individual scores. Montgomery educators have raised questions about the 2001 Maryland School Performance Assessment Program results, noting technical problems and concerns over how teachers graded pupils' exams.
NEWS
By Joel McCord and Joel McCord,SUN STAFF | February 12, 2002
Operators of Hagerstown's disabled wastewater treatment plant are expected to begin using chlorine today to disinfect raw sewage that has been flowing into a Potomac River tributary since chemicals from an unknown source knocked out the plant Friday. The plant has been spilling 5.7 million gallons of raw sewage a day into Antietam Creek since one or more toxic chemicals killed the microbes that remove harmful germs in sewage. Officials could not say how long it would be before the plant is operating normally.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Baltimore Sun reporter | April 28, 2011
The powerful cold front that spawned deadly and destructive tornadoes across the South this week passed through Maryland Thursday with more than a dozen tornado warnings. But in the end there were no reports of catastrophic damage. Survey teams from the National Weather Service's Sterling, Va., forecast office were dispatched Thursday to the Shenandoah Valley and to Loudon County in Virginia, and to Frederick County in Maryland to look for any damage indicating that tornadoes had touched down.
NEWS
By Chris Guy and Chris Guy,SUN STAFF | November 20, 2004
A Washington-based environmental group says Hagerstown's sewage treatment plant is routinely dumping raw waste into Antietam Creek, and the organization is threatening to sue unless the city corrects "chronic environmental violations." In the past four years, the plant has dumped millions of gallons of raw sewage and partially treated wastewater into the creek, a major tributary of the Potomac River, according to the group Potomac Riverkeeper. The four-year-old nonprofit organization, which monitors the 383-mile river and its 14,000-acre watershed, says records from 2000 to this year show that the plant repeatedly exceeded its discharge limits.
NEWS
By Joel McCord and Joel McCord,SUN STAFF | February 14, 2002
HAGERSTOWN - Downstream communities fretted yesterday over the effect on their drinking water supplies of about 20 million gallons of sewage that have spilled from a Hagerstown treatment plant since Saturday. Meanwhile, Hagerstown public works officials scrambled to get their disabled sewage treatment plant, which discharges into a Potomac River tributary, back in full operation. Brunswick, the first community downstream that draws drinking water from the river, closed its Antietam Creek intake pipes about 11 p.m. Tuesday "as a precautionary measure," said Kevin Brawner, the Frederick County town's director of public facilities.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,tim.wheeler@baltsun.com | March 19, 2009
A proposed trash incinerator and a planned natural gas plant threaten to encroach on two Civil War battlefield sites in Western Maryland, a preservation group warned yesterday. The Washington-based Civil War Preservation Trust said recent developments have put the Monocacy National Battlefield near Frederick and South Mountain near Middletown on its list of the nation's most endangered battlefields from that war. "In town after town, the irreplaceable battlefields that define those communities are being marred forever," said O. James Lighthizer, the trust's president.
SPORTS
March 31, 1991
The following stocked, put-and-take trout streams were opened in Maryland yesterday:Garrett CountyBear Creek, Savage River (upper), Mill Run, Muddy Creek, Salt Block Run, Buffalo Run, Herrington Creek, Little Youghiogheny River.Washington CountyBeaver Creek, Little Antietam Creek, Blairs Valley Lake, Indian Spring Pond, Greenbriar Lake, Sideling Hill Creek.Carroll CountyBeaver Run, Westminster Pond, Piney Run, Farm Museum Pond, Patapsco River (Rte. 32 area).Howard-Montgomery countiesLittle Seneca Creek, Patuxent River (Laurel area)
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