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NEWS
December 3, 2012
At a time when a growing number of able-body unemployed people look to the government for entitlements, remain unemployed because they can't find a job that they believe is good enough for them, assume little responsibility for the children they've created, and do little to contribute to their communities, it is encouraging to see a family like the Bartlinskis ("As adopted daughter awaits new heart, family prays for miracle," Nov. 29). In addition to responsibly caring for the four children that they brought into the world, they have adopted five others, including a child with severe cardiac problems.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 27, 2013
With the stresses our teachers are experiencing with meeting the demands of the new Common Core standards, evaluation systems and new school initiatives, it was refreshing to read the front page coverage of a promising and innovative approach to education - and one that gives hope to parents and educators alike that teaching and learning can be creative, imaginative and based on the latest research ("Roland Park teaching to be subject of documentary," ...
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NEWS
January 12, 2011
Last night, as Maryland's power brokers nibbled crab cakes and congratulated themselves on their success, candidate for mayor Otis Rolley presented a vision of a Baltimore very different from the city most of us know today ( "Bill Cosby comes to town for Rolley," Jan. 12). The developers and politicians who paid thousands to support Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake may not be as happy under a Rolley administration, but the rest us, the tired taxpayers who are sick of the status quo at City Hall , may be. I'm sure the mayor is a very nice person, and both her political and educational pedigree are impeccable, but last night's event underscored just how entrenched in "business as usual" she is. Baltimoreans must decide if we are content with competent management of our city's slow, inevitable decline, or if we are ready to adopt a bold vision of a future in which Baltimore reverses course to become a world class city.
EXPLORE
September 18, 2013
When thunder rumbled recently, I did not care that my swimming laps would have to be postponed. My hope was that the rumbles would continue and move closer to home. They did. Winds whipped up the hill and rain poured. Water gushed like rivers from the downspouts, and with it my resolve to install rain barrels. We had had only a trace of rain in six weeks. The ground was hard. Trees, lawns and plants were brown. This has been a schizophrenic garden season. With abundant spring rains, homeowners and gardeners were slow to realize the need to water late this summer.
NEWS
May 17, 2011
While many may consider it catastrophic if the debt ceiling is not raised and the government is forced into a temporary shutdown, it might be the best medicine for those who dismiss our burgeoning deficit as no problem. We have spent beyond our limits. Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner has chosen to raid the retirement funds of government employees to prevent a shutdown. While I have no love for the tea party, their demand for a balanced budget seems appropriate if we are to maintain a vibrant economy here and have political and market clout overseas.
NEWS
By CARL T. ROWAN | April 28, 1995
Washington. -- The heinous murders of innocent people in that grisly Oklahoma City bombing have understandably provoked cries for drastic actions to prevent such an event in the future.We hear calls to ''unleash'' the FBI at home and the CIA abroad, and to wipe out all restraints regarding electronic surveillance, wiretapping and the infiltration of groups -- and individuals -- on someone's list of ''possible terrorists.''As President Clinton and others denounce the talk-show purveyors of verbal terrorism and the politicians who inflame borderline psychopaths, we hear talk of a law to silence them.
NEWS
By Michael A. Fletcher and Michael A. Fletcher,Evening Sun Staff | December 4, 1990
The derelict men hanging out on the stoops of vacant homes in the 1900 block of Pulaski St. seem befuddled by the line of chanting school children.Some of the loiterers scatter. But others begin chanting along with the students, who are from West Baltimore's Robert W. Coleman Elementary School."Extra! Extra! Read all about it! We hate drugs and we're going to shout it!," yell the children, 404 strong, as they march behind the school's blue and gold banner.Addie E. Johnson, principal of Coleman, conceived of the march, held early in the school year, as a way of confronting the drug menace in the neighborhood.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | August 4, 2000
At least George will never bore you to death like Al. He does not know more than five minutes' worth on any subject. But George better think twice about running against Bill. Bill would only win again. There is no more effective antidote to a good Republican convention than a bad John Waters movie. The problem was the relief pitching staff, so they got rid of Johnson, Border and Surhoff, and kept most of the relief staff.
BUSINESS
March 16, 1991
Survival Technology Inc.The Bethesda-based company that supplies nerve-gas antidote to the Defense Department said that the Persian Gulf war helped to boost its second-quarter profits by more than 250 percent.The company said that it expects to complete delivery of all of its current orders from the Pentagon by May. Management expects to get new orders as the Defense Department moves to replenish supplies used during the conflict.Survival Technology doesn't make the nerve-gas antidote itself; the company makes the "auto-injector" that is filled with the antidote and used to administer it.The company also makes syringe systems for drugs that have nothing to do with the military.
NEWS
By Michael Pakenham | February 5, 1995
"The Western Canon, The Books and School of the Ages," by Harold Bloom. 578 pages. Harcourt Brace & Co. $29.95Published last year, but evergreen. The perfect mind-saving antidote to deconstructionists and other evanescent faddists who are instantly identifiable by their chant: " Hey, Hey, Ho, Ho, Western culture"s got to go!" (No fooling.) Bloom is detested and reviled by tenured radical chic and cheek, but this volume adds substantial weight to the case that he may be the greatest living critic working in the English language.
NEWS
By Ellen Weber, Andrea Gielen and G. Caleb Alexander | February 25, 2013
With epidemic rates of prescription opioid and heroin deaths in Maryland, families are demanding easier access to the antidote that could save the lives of their loved ones. Naloxone is used safely to reverse the effects of heroin and prescription opioid medications. Emergency medical technicians administer naloxone when they respond to an overdose emergency. All too often, however, these emergency responders do not arrive in time. State law bars family members and friends who may be in the best position to save the life of a person experiencing an overdose from obtaining a prescription for naloxone in their own name and administering this medication in an emergency.
EXPLORE
January 7, 2013
After the "holidaze," nothing to me is as restorative as a return to routine. At first, when picking up wrapping paper and boxes, it seems that order will never return. All efforts feel uphill, with no end to clutter in sight. Refrigerators and desktops overflow. Bite by bite, box by box (plus a few bags to the trash and Goodwill), a glimmer of order reappears. If a few tasks are done each day, gradually the house resumes a semblance of order. I begin reading one or two of the books I've been given as Christmas gifts, go to a movie, listen to new music and eat some spicy chili or Italian food as an antidote to holiday fare.
NEWS
December 3, 2012
At a time when a growing number of able-body unemployed people look to the government for entitlements, remain unemployed because they can't find a job that they believe is good enough for them, assume little responsibility for the children they've created, and do little to contribute to their communities, it is encouraging to see a family like the Bartlinskis ("As adopted daughter awaits new heart, family prays for miracle," Nov. 29). In addition to responsibly caring for the four children that they brought into the world, they have adopted five others, including a child with severe cardiac problems.
SPORTS
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | November 20, 2011
I couldn't do it again. Honest, I tried, but I just couldn't. I saw Greg Gumbel and Dan Dierdorf on my TV screen at the top of the Ravens telecast Sunday, and I knew I couldn't spend another Sunday afternoon listening to dumb and dumber of CBS Sports without my head exploding. It was radical, I know, but after too many Sundays spent with Gumbel and Dierdorf, I dared to consider the possibility of actually enjoying a Ravens game over the airwaves. And so, I did what dozens of readers have been encouraging me to do all season: I watched images of the game on CBS, and I listened to the play-by-play and analysis on WBAL radio from Gerry Sandusky, Stan White and Qadry Ismail.
NEWS
May 17, 2011
While many may consider it catastrophic if the debt ceiling is not raised and the government is forced into a temporary shutdown, it might be the best medicine for those who dismiss our burgeoning deficit as no problem. We have spent beyond our limits. Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner has chosen to raid the retirement funds of government employees to prevent a shutdown. While I have no love for the tea party, their demand for a balanced budget seems appropriate if we are to maintain a vibrant economy here and have political and market clout overseas.
NEWS
January 12, 2011
Last night, as Maryland's power brokers nibbled crab cakes and congratulated themselves on their success, candidate for mayor Otis Rolley presented a vision of a Baltimore very different from the city most of us know today ( "Bill Cosby comes to town for Rolley," Jan. 12). The developers and politicians who paid thousands to support Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake may not be as happy under a Rolley administration, but the rest us, the tired taxpayers who are sick of the status quo at City Hall , may be. I'm sure the mayor is a very nice person, and both her political and educational pedigree are impeccable, but last night's event underscored just how entrenched in "business as usual" she is. Baltimoreans must decide if we are content with competent management of our city's slow, inevitable decline, or if we are ready to adopt a bold vision of a future in which Baltimore reverses course to become a world class city.
NEWS
March 20, 2003
OVERDOSE IS the heroin addict's occupational hazard. Last year, 324 died in Baltimore after excessive heroin use so numbed their central nervous systems they couldn't breathe. Many of these addicts might have been saved if they had received a timely antidote and resuscitation. That's why Baltimore's health department has embarked on a radical experiment: training 50 addicts to inject naloxone, an opiate blocker. As of May, if those so trained find fellow addicts overdosing, they are directed to intervene and attempt resuscitation.
SPORTS
By LAURA VECSEY | November 8, 2003
THE DOOR TO Lee Mazzilli's major league managing career opened back on Aug. 8 at Fenway Park. Not that anyone realized it at the time. The Orioles had opened a four-game weekend series against the Boston Red Sox, promptly taking both ends of a doubleheader and winning three of four. It was a tremendous lift for the Orioles, who featured so many young players attempting to prove they could beat their toughest American League East rivals. It was an apparent boon to manager Mike Hargrove, who was in the final weeks of his contract and who, like everyone else within the organization, was under scrutiny in this "season of evaluation."
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Mike Klingaman and Don Markus and Mike Klingaman,don.markus@baltsun.com and Mike.Klingaman@baltsun.com | December 1, 2009
Maryland's 4-0 start is history - along with its No. 21 national basketball ranking - wiped out by back-to-back losses in Hawaii last week. But Gary Williams isn't sweating yet. "We're a good basketball team, and we'll prove it," the Terps coach said Monday before his team left for tonight's contest at Indiana. Maryland (4-2) hopes to recapture its swagger against the Hoosiers (3-3) in a game that is part of the Big Ten/ACC Challenge. Indiana could be the antidote for the Terps.
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