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NEWS
March 25, 2010
Sen. Benjamin L. Cardin called Wednesday for an investigation into possible links between the growing use of antidepressants by members of the military and high rates of suicide among men and women in uniform. The Maryland Democrat, in remarks to a Senate Armed Services subcommittee, said that only "a proper scientific study" can determine whether the Defense Department "is prescribing antidepressants to its service members appropriately." Cardin quoted from the most recent Defense Department statistics, covering 2005 to 2008, showing a 400 percent increase in prescriptions for antidepressants and other drugs used to combat anxiety.
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NEWS
March 25, 2010
Sen. Benjamin L. Cardin called Wednesday for an investigation into possible links between the growing use of antidepressants by members of the military and high rates of suicide among men and women in uniform. The Maryland Democrat, in remarks to a Senate Armed Services subcommittee, said that only "a proper scientific study" can determine whether the Defense Department "is prescribing antidepressants to its service members appropriately." Cardin quoted from the most recent Defense Department statistics, covering 2005 to 2008, showing a 400 percent increase in prescriptions for antidepressants and other drugs used to combat anxiety.
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NEWS
By Jonathan D. Rockoff and Jonathan D. Rockoff,Sun Reporter | May 3, 2007
WASHINGTON -- Federal health officials proposed new label warnings for all antidepressants yesterday, a move aimed at protecting 18- to 24-year-olds who might be at increased risk of suicidal thinking and behavior during early months of treatment. The "black box" update would follow similar changes made to antidepressants' labels in 2005 that added a warning of increased suicide risks among children and adolescents but did not give specific ages.
NEWS
January 30, 2008
The Food and Drug Administration is requiring some drug manufacturers to determine whether participants in their clinical trials might commit suicide as a result of taking the tested drug. It's a hidden danger that has worried mental health experts for a number of years, so the FDA's action is a welcome, if overdue, step in ensuring the safety of those who take many of the drugs it approves. In 2004, an increased risk of suicide became evident among children and teenagers taking antidepressants.
NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,King Features Syndicate | August 14, 2005
My adult son was prescribed Paxil for depression. Around day 13 he slipped into a mood that I had never seen before. He never came out of it. Four days later, he shot himself in the temple with a .22 rifle. He had taken Paxil for 17 days. I hold the Food and Drug Administration and the maker of Paxil responsible for my son's suicide. No one should ever have to look at a son's or daughter's tombstone! Your story is heartbreaking. On July 1, 2005, the FDA issued the following Public Health Advisory: Adults being treated with antidepressant medicines, particularly those being treated for depression, should be watched closely for worsening of depression and for increased suicidal thinking or behavior.
NEWS
By Judy Foreman and Judy Foreman,Special to the Sun | May 11, 2007
How can I decide whether to take antidepressants? Untreated depression is a terrible disease, and antidepressants help millions of people. But they should be taken under tight medical supervision, said Dr. Alexander Bodkin, chief of clinical psychopharmacology research at McLean Hospital in Belmont, Mass. During the first few days of taking an SSRI-type antidepressant, many people feel intense agitation, even panic. This is actually "a sign that the SSRIs are on the way to making you better," Bodkin said.
NEWS
By Bloomberg News | June 28, 2007
Use of antidepressants by pregnant women doesn't significantly increase the risk of birth defects, with rare exceptions, two studies found. The overall risk of having a child with a defect increased by less than 1 percent in women on the drugs, including Pfizer Inc.'s Zoloft, GlaxoSmithKline PLC's Paxil and Forest Laboratories Inc.'s Celexa, according to research published today in The New England Journal of Medicine. As many as one in five pregnant women has symptoms of depression, according to the American Pregnancy Association, a Texas-based nonprofit organization.
NEWS
By Denise Gellene and Denise Gellene,Los Angeles Times | March 30, 2007
Antidepressants, which are widely prescribed with mood stabilizers to treat patients with bipolar disorder, do not work in relieving the depressive symptoms of the illness, according to a large new federal study. The study, reported in Wednesday's New England Journal of Medicine, narrows the already limited number of treatments for bipolar disorder, which affects 5.7 million adults in the United States, experts said. "A new generation of drugs is needed," said Dr. Thomas R. Insel, director of the National Institute of Mental Health.
FEATURES
By Shari Roan and Shari Roan,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 14, 1997
As the popularity of such antidepressants as Prozac, Zoloft and Paxil has increased, so too have some little-known problems associated with the medications.While rarely life-threatening, misuse of this particular class of antidepressants, called selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, or SSRIs, can result in three conditions, including:Serotonin syndrome, a potentially dangerous condition in which two or more drugs -- both of which elevate serotonin levels in the body -- are taken together or at close intervals.
NEWS
By Julie Bell and Julie Bell,SUN STAFF | October 28, 2003
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration alerted doctors yesterday to a possible increased suicide risk among children and teen-agers taking several of the eight most common antidepressants. But the agency said more study is needed to determine whether the drugs are at fault. While the public health advisory is intended to remind doctors to prescribe antidepressants with caution, the language amounted to a softening of the FDA's June recommendation that doctors avoid giving young patients one of the drugs.
FEATURES
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,Sun reporter | January 17, 2008
Research on antidepressants is 12 times as likely to be published in medical journals if the results show the drugs work, making it hard for doctors to pick the right medication for their patients, according to new findings in today's New England Journal of Medicine. With 94 percent of the publicly available studies by pharmaceutical companies showing the drugs are effective, the information most accessible to doctors makes them appear to work much better than they do, the authors found.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,Sun reporter | September 7, 2007
Suicide rates for teens and young adults jumped 8 percent in 2004 as doctors prescribed fewer antidepressants in light of government warnings about the drugs' possible harmful effects on adolescents, according to two new studies. Among people ages 10 to 24, the number of suicides jumped from 4,258 to 4,599 in 2004, the most significant rise in teen suicides in 14 years, according to a report by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. That reverses a 28 percent slide in suicide rates for the age group that began in 1990.
NEWS
By Bloomberg News | June 28, 2007
Use of antidepressants by pregnant women doesn't significantly increase the risk of birth defects, with rare exceptions, two studies found. The overall risk of having a child with a defect increased by less than 1 percent in women on the drugs, including Pfizer Inc.'s Zoloft, GlaxoSmithKline PLC's Paxil and Forest Laboratories Inc.'s Celexa, according to research published today in The New England Journal of Medicine. As many as one in five pregnant women has symptoms of depression, according to the American Pregnancy Association, a Texas-based nonprofit organization.
NEWS
By Judy Foreman and Judy Foreman,Special to the Sun | May 11, 2007
How can I decide whether to take antidepressants? Untreated depression is a terrible disease, and antidepressants help millions of people. But they should be taken under tight medical supervision, said Dr. Alexander Bodkin, chief of clinical psychopharmacology research at McLean Hospital in Belmont, Mass. During the first few days of taking an SSRI-type antidepressant, many people feel intense agitation, even panic. This is actually "a sign that the SSRIs are on the way to making you better," Bodkin said.
NEWS
By Jonathan D. Rockoff and Jonathan D. Rockoff,Sun Reporter | May 3, 2007
WASHINGTON -- Federal health officials proposed new label warnings for all antidepressants yesterday, a move aimed at protecting 18- to 24-year-olds who might be at increased risk of suicidal thinking and behavior during early months of treatment. The "black box" update would follow similar changes made to antidepressants' labels in 2005 that added a warning of increased suicide risks among children and adolescents but did not give specific ages.
NEWS
By Denise Gellene and Denise Gellene,Los Angeles Times | March 30, 2007
Antidepressants, which are widely prescribed with mood stabilizers to treat patients with bipolar disorder, do not work in relieving the depressive symptoms of the illness, according to a large new federal study. The study, reported in Wednesday's New England Journal of Medicine, narrows the already limited number of treatments for bipolar disorder, which affects 5.7 million adults in the United States, experts said. "A new generation of drugs is needed," said Dr. Thomas R. Insel, director of the National Institute of Mental Health.
NEWS
By Julie Bell and Julie Bell,SUN STAFF | August 21, 2004
The Food and Drug Administration plans to update warning labels on antidepressants after a new review of study data showed a possible link between the drugs and suicidal tendencies among children. The debate over whether the drugs are at fault, however, is unlikely to be settled by the FDA review. It continued to rage yesterday as doctors parsed the statistics in the 130-page report posted on the agency's Web site. "The best estimate you can get out of it is that there is a significant increased risk," said Dr. Martin Teicher, a Harvard University associate professor who raised the question of a link in the early 1990s.
NEWS
By Judith Graham and Judith Graham,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | December 14, 2006
Young adults are at heightened risk of becoming suicidal when they take antidepressants, and warnings on the drugs' labels should be altered to highlight that potential, a federal advisory committee recommended yesterday. The committee's action addresses one of the most controversial questions in psychiatry - do antidepressants increase suicidal thoughts and behavior in some patients, and if so, are the risks significant enough to require a regulatory response? Two years ago, the Food and Drug Administration gave a partial answer when it concluded that antidepressants increased the potential for suicide in children and teenagers and required drug companies to post a strong warning on medication labels.
NEWS
February 10, 2006
Pregnancy Prozac, other drugs cause lung disorder New research has linked the use of Prozac and similar antidepressants during pregnancy to yet another complication in newborns: an uncommon but life-threatening lung problem. Infants whose mothers took the antidepressants in the second half of pregnancy had six times the expected risk of developing the lung disorder, the researchers reported in yesterday's New England Journal of Medicine. The antidepressants implicated are called selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, or SSRIs, a class of drugs that includes Eli Lilly & Co.'s Prozac, GlaxoSmithKline's Paxil and Pfizer's Zoloft.
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