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Antibiotic Resistance

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NEWS
March 18, 2013
On March 13th you published a letter written by reader Lois Raimondi Munchel titled "Stop the spread of deadly bacteria in nursing homes. " The letter was timely. It should send alarm bells ringing not only through the hallways of our nursing homes but also through our hospitals and our operating rooms. Not too long ago, at the NIH hospital, deadly Klebseilla bacteria resistant to all antibiotics, were found. Fifty percent of patients with this bacterial infection will die. These lethal, resistant bacteria have appeared in hospitals up and down the East Coast.
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NEWS
By Matthew Wellington and Robert S. Lawrence | October 1, 2014
Science tells us that the overuse of antibiotics is leading to "super bugs," bacteria that are increasingly difficult if not impossible to kill with antibiotics. The biggest users — and arguably abusers — of antibiotics are large-scale industrial farms. More than 70 percent of antibiotics are used on livestock and poultry, and at many facilities, antibiotics are fed to animals that aren't sick. This enables the animals to grow faster and lets them stay healthy despite cramped, confined quarters where bacteria abound.
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NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | May 31, 1997
BOSTON -- People striving to sterilize their homes and hands with anti-bacterial soaps may be fueling the development of dangerous organisms that defy known drugs, an authority on drug-resistant strains said yesterday.Dr. Stuart Levy of Tufts University, president of the Alliance for Prudent Use of Antibiotics, said yesterday that the popularity of disinfectant cleaners could not come at a worse time -- an era when hospitals are discharging patients earlier to complete their recoveries at home.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | September 3, 2014
Antibiotics have saved countless lives over the years, but their overuse has lead to problems including antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Dr. Mary R. Clance, an epidemiologist at Anne Arundel Medical Center, discusses the history, troubles and appropriate uses of the drugs. How have antibiotics contributed to public health since their discovery and what is their status now? The collective memory of death from infectious disease is short-lived. Death from pneumonia, puerperal fever, post-operative infection, urinary and skin infections were commonplace just two generations ago. Pneumonia was the leading cause of death at the beginning of the 20th century.
NEWS
By Matthew Wellington and Robert S. Lawrence | October 1, 2014
Science tells us that the overuse of antibiotics is leading to "super bugs," bacteria that are increasingly difficult if not impossible to kill with antibiotics. The biggest users — and arguably abusers — of antibiotics are large-scale industrial farms. More than 70 percent of antibiotics are used on livestock and poultry, and at many facilities, antibiotics are fed to animals that aren't sick. This enables the animals to grow faster and lets them stay healthy despite cramped, confined quarters where bacteria abound.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | September 3, 2014
Antibiotics have saved countless lives over the years, but their overuse has lead to problems including antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Dr. Mary R. Clance, an epidemiologist at Anne Arundel Medical Center, discusses the history, troubles and appropriate uses of the drugs. How have antibiotics contributed to public health since their discovery and what is their status now? The collective memory of death from infectious disease is short-lived. Death from pneumonia, puerperal fever, post-operative infection, urinary and skin infections were commonplace just two generations ago. Pneumonia was the leading cause of death at the beginning of the 20th century.
NEWS
By CHRIS EMERY and CHRIS EMERY,SUN REPORTER | July 22, 2006
Two Maryland hospitals will soon begin testing methods to stop the spread of deadly antibiotic-resistant bacteria, a pilot project that could lead to changes in the way health care facilities statewide deal with this stubborn problem. About 120,000 patients in the United States were infected with the bacteria known as MRSA in 2002, according to data from the national Centers for Disease Control. Many hospitals have struggled to prevent infections because the bacteria can pass easily among patients and staff members, and through contact with contaminated equipment.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | November 6, 2012
Hospitals aren't the only places where people can pick up a nasty "superbug. " A  University of Maryland -led team of researchers has found methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus , or MRSA, at sewage treatment plants in the mid-Atlantic and the Midwest. MRSA is a well-known problem in hospitals, where patients have picked up potentially fatal bacterial infections that do not respond to antibiotic treatment.  But since the late 1990s, it's also been showing up in otherwise healthy people outside of health-care facilities, prompting a search for sources in the wider community.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN REPORTER | April 30, 2008
A panel of experts, assembled in part by the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, is recommending that the United States ban the routine use of antibiotics in farm animal feed. The Pew Commission on Industrial Farm Animal Production also proposes better tracking of diseases among farm animals, to help prevent the spread of antibiotic-resistant bacteria to humans. "We've got too many animals too close together producing too much waste without any realistic way of handling the waste," said John Carlin, a farmer and former Kansas governor who chairs the commission.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | April 23, 2002
The widespread use of antibiotics on farm animals may be shortening the length of time the drugs are useful in treating human disease, according to researchers from the University of Maryland School of Medicine. In a report being published today in a national scientific journal, the researchers said it is difficult to say how large a role farms are playing in the growing crisis of antibiotic resistance in the treatment of infections. But David L. Smith, an assistant professor of epidemiology, said there is growing evidence that the heavy use of antibiotics on chickens, pigs and cattle is shortening the "honeymoon period" before drugs lose their effectiveness in people.
NEWS
March 18, 2013
On March 13th you published a letter written by reader Lois Raimondi Munchel titled "Stop the spread of deadly bacteria in nursing homes. " The letter was timely. It should send alarm bells ringing not only through the hallways of our nursing homes but also through our hospitals and our operating rooms. Not too long ago, at the NIH hospital, deadly Klebseilla bacteria resistant to all antibiotics, were found. Fifty percent of patients with this bacterial infection will die. These lethal, resistant bacteria have appeared in hospitals up and down the East Coast.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | November 6, 2012
Hospitals aren't the only places where people can pick up a nasty "superbug. " A  University of Maryland -led team of researchers has found methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus , or MRSA, at sewage treatment plants in the mid-Atlantic and the Midwest. MRSA is a well-known problem in hospitals, where patients have picked up potentially fatal bacterial infections that do not respond to antibiotic treatment.  But since the late 1990s, it's also been showing up in otherwise healthy people outside of health-care facilities, prompting a search for sources in the wider community.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN REPORTER | April 30, 2008
A panel of experts, assembled in part by the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, is recommending that the United States ban the routine use of antibiotics in farm animal feed. The Pew Commission on Industrial Farm Animal Production also proposes better tracking of diseases among farm animals, to help prevent the spread of antibiotic-resistant bacteria to humans. "We've got too many animals too close together producing too much waste without any realistic way of handling the waste," said John Carlin, a farmer and former Kansas governor who chairs the commission.
NEWS
By CHRIS EMERY and CHRIS EMERY,SUN REPORTER | July 22, 2006
Two Maryland hospitals will soon begin testing methods to stop the spread of deadly antibiotic-resistant bacteria, a pilot project that could lead to changes in the way health care facilities statewide deal with this stubborn problem. About 120,000 patients in the United States were infected with the bacteria known as MRSA in 2002, according to data from the national Centers for Disease Control. Many hospitals have struggled to prevent infections because the bacteria can pass easily among patients and staff members, and through contact with contaminated equipment.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | May 31, 1997
BOSTON -- People striving to sterilize their homes and hands with anti-bacterial soaps may be fueling the development of dangerous organisms that defy known drugs, an authority on drug-resistant strains said yesterday.Dr. Stuart Levy of Tufts University, president of the Alliance for Prudent Use of Antibiotics, said yesterday that the popularity of disinfectant cleaners could not come at a worse time -- an era when hospitals are discharging patients earlier to complete their recoveries at home.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | October 14, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Some serious summer flu outbreaks have infectious disease experts gearing up for what could be a ferocious -- and early -- flu season.Too few people are getting the flu shots that could save their lives in the yearly epidemics that sweep the nation, said experts who gathered here yesterday for an international conference on vaccines.Even fewer are getting a second shot, pneumococcal vaccine, which prevents the pneumonia, bronchitis, middle-ear infections and sinusitis that often follow flu. The vaccine, needed only once in a lifetime, has been available since 1977 and can be taken at the same time as the flu shot.
NEWS
December 2, 2000
SICK CHICKS or sick people? The livestock industry's massive use of antibiotics has apparently led to strains of bacteria that are resistant to those wonder drugs. And that puts humans increasingly at risk from food-borne infection. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration a month ago finally took action by banning two antibiotics widely used by poultry growers since 1995. The same family of drugs (fluoroquinolones) used to combat food poisoning in humans has shown a dramatic loss of effectiveness in that short period.
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