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By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,Sun Staff Correspondent | October 20, 1991
ANNAPOLIS -- An anti-tax demonstration outside the Governor's Mansion yesterday morning -- one of many such protests across the United States -- drew only about 150 taxpayers, but what it lacked in size it made up for in rancor.When Gov. William Donald Schaefer appeared by the iron fence surrounding the mansion about 10:45 a.m., the crowd in Lawyers Square began booing and chanting "Recall!" and "Pay cut!" One man screamed that the governor was "incompetent."Mr. Schaefer told reporters that one of the rally leaders was "a rabble-rouser" and repeatedly called the most vocal protester "big mouth."
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NEWS
By Greg Kline | February 7, 2014
Recently, Republican candidate for governor Charles Lollar gave an interview to the Washington Post in which he touted his idea to eliminate Maryland's income tax. Mr. Lollar, however, has not issued a detailed plan explaining how he would offset the revenue generated by the state's income tax, which represents over half of all the general fund revenue taken by the state.  Mr. Lollar simply states that he " is confident that the loss in revenue can be offset by the economic impact of recruiting more businesses to the state.
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NEWS
By Howard Libit and David Nitkin and Howard Libit and David Nitkin,SUN STAFF | April 13, 2004
IF YOU THOUGHT Bob Ehrlich's anti-tax sentiment was strong, check out the credentials of Frederick County lawmakers Joseph R. Bartlett and Alex X. Mooney. Bartlett, a second-term delegate, and Mooney, a second-term senator, vote against almost every revenue proposal. It doesn't matter if it's a hotel tax in Dorchester County or a development purchase in Howard County, Bartlett and Mooney are sure to vote "red" against the measure. They'll even pull taxes off lengthy "consent" calendars just to record their opposition.
NEWS
April 16, 2013
There has been much hue and cry in recent days about the General Assembly approving a "rain tax" this year that is punitive, anti-commerce and unnecessary. What's truly remarkable about these protestations is how none of the underlying claims are true. Rather, this may be a lesson in the perils of approving a policy at the state level but leaving the business of carrying it out to local government. It's far easier for county elected leaders to point a finger at Annapolis than to actually educate themselves on an issue - let alone try to explain why a tax is so clearly in their constituents' self-interest.
NEWS
March 25, 1992
That recent squabble between Baltimore County Executive Roger B. Hayden and several of the "anti-tax" protesters who helped him win office ended in what participants described as a family feud. This is hardly a family squabble.The tax protesters, testifying before a state Senate committee, tried to intimidate Mr. Hayden by charging he would have to "look for a new job" if he opposed them in supporting a bill to have the county assume the job of assessing property, a role now handled by the state.
NEWS
May 4, 1992
Q: What's 100 county employees at the bottom of the ocean?A: A good start.That joke is making the rounds in Towson these days. It reflects the views of many of those in the anti-tax faction of Baltimore County. No amount of pain for the county work force seems too high in their view.Need to find $25 million to forestall a proposed piggyback tax increase in the county?No problem, the tax protesters say. Save up to $8 million by wiping out pay increases in any form, including step or merit raises, for all county workers.
NEWS
By BARRY RASCOVAR | April 19, 1992
The retreat from reality continues in Baltimore County. Its legislative delegation has become a captive of the anti-tax crazies. More accurately, these malleable officials have marched into the "something for nothing" camp themselves.It is understandable that legislators differ on the need to raise taxes. But no legislator should be of the opinion that government can operate without a budget. Yet there were 15 of 22 Baltimore County delegates and 6 of 7 senators voting against passage of a budget nine days ago. It was a vote for anarchy.
NEWS
By John W. Frece and John W. Frece,Annapolis Bureau | April 30, 1992
*TC ANNAPOLIS -- The leader of a statewide anti-tax group says his organization is working with a pro-gun group to target individual legislators for defeat in 1994.John D. O'Neill, president of the Maryland Taxpayers' Association, says he is already preparing a "hit list" of lawmakers from the 3-week-old House and Senate roll-call votes on the tax package worth nearly half a billion dollars that the General Assembly approved.Mr. O'Neill, whose organization tried to persuade lawmakers to avoid tax increases with deeper spending cuts, said he has been talking "for several months" with the Maryland State Rifle and Pistol Association and other special-interest groups in the hope of identifying incumbents they can agree to target together.
NEWS
By BARRY RASCOVAR and BARRY RASCOVAR,Barry Rascovar is editorial-page director of The Sun | March 29, 1992
*TC Message to Roger Hayden: welcome to the real world. Your extended honeymoon is over. Friends who helped put you in office have turned on you -- quite savagely. Even your achievements are being belittled and denigrated as insufficient.The Baltimore County executive finds himself fleeing from the brat-bats being hurled by the anti-tax fanatics and by unionized teachers. Meanwhile, his economic development director's generous expense-account practices are bringing ridicule to the Hayden regime at the same time the county's retiring education czar is being called on the carpet for slipshod management.
NEWS
May 17, 1992
Crash TestsKim Clark's front page story of May 5 begins by calling the Baltimore-built Chevrolet Astro van "one of the most dangerous, according to federal crash tests."Twenty paragraphs later, on the back page, she writes, "In fact, the Highway Loss Data Institute, a private insurance research group that compiles insurance claims, has found the Astro. . .vans to be among the safest vehicles on the road."So, whom do you believe? The insurance companies whose data are derived from vans driven by real people on real roads?
NEWS
By David Horsey | December 4, 2012
Ayatollahs seem to just appoint themselves and then start enforcing their own brand of orthodoxy. Grover Norquist has been doing that in the Republican Party for years. Mr. Norquist has never been elected to anything. Nobody ever said he should be in charge of the GOP's true religion (although he claims President Ronald Reagan urged him to found his lobbying group, Americans for Tax Reform). But he certainly has been the Republicans' key political theologian who made opposition to tax increases the party's central tenet for more than 25 years.
NEWS
By George W. Liebmann | December 19, 2011
For the last 20 years, the charming Grover Norquist has been perhaps the most successful of American political entrepreneurs, having used a letterhead and small office to secure "no tax" pledges from a near-majority of Congress members and myriads of state legislators, and holding well-intended Wednesday meetings to spread the gospel. He would not be distressed to be credited with a Leninist capacity for political organization. He has, to a large extent - as demonstrated by the supercommittee debacle - been successful.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | June 26, 2011
I pay my taxes. I will not offend your intelligence by pretending to enjoy it. Writing that check is about as enjoyable as a chain-saw root canal. But I don't resent it, either. I pay my taxes because this is how we the people pay for things we deem to be in our communal interest. This is how our military is sustained. This is how our children are educated. This is how our potholes are filled. This is how our libraries are stocked. This is how our police officers are supplied.
NEWS
By Larry Carson, The Baltimore Sun | August 14, 2010
A Republican-sponsored petition drive intended to require a super-majority of County Council votes to increase taxes has failed to collect enough signatures to place the issue before voters in November. Ken Aldrich, who organized the drive for the local GOP, said his team collected about 5,000 of the 10,000 signatures required to put the measure on the ballot. Monday is the deadline for submitting the names. "We lose. We're not going to pursue it any more" this year, Aldrich said.
NEWS
By Laura Smitherman and Jonathan Pitts and Laura Smitherman and Jonathan Pitts,laura.smitherman@baltsun.com and jonathan.pitts@baltsun.com | April 16, 2009
British expatriate Andrew Summers saw no irony in joining hundreds of rain-soaked protesters Wednesday in Annapolis for an anti-tax tea party modeled after 18th-century Colonial revolts. "Justice is justice no matter where you're from," said Summers, who moved to Baltimore 17 years ago. "I'm tired of the government using us as an ATM machine." Protesters filled the Annapolis City Dock - one of hundreds of tea parties held across Maryland and the nation - to toss tea bags into the water, sing "The Star-Spangled Banner" and listen to fiery speeches against the economic policies of President Barack Obama and Gov. Martin O'Malley.
TOPIC
By Jules Witcover and Jules Witcover,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 6, 2005
WASHINGTON - From the day in 2001 when George W. Bush assumed the presidency relinquished only eight years earlier by his father, he seemed determined not to make the same political mistakes that had denied George H.W. Bush a second term in 1992. Remembering how the first President Bush had reneged on his 1988 "Read my lips: no new taxes" pledge, the second President Bush made the opposite - deep tax cuts - his mantra throughout his first term. Unlike his politically aloof father, he also assiduously played to the Republican Party's conservative base, campaigning diligently after his 2000 election.
NEWS
February 28, 1992
Baltimore County Councilman Donald Mason spearheaded the protest over property taxes in Dundalk that helped sweep him and others into office. He beat a drum against big taxes and bigger government for years. But now he says that if taxes must go up, why not raise the property tax?Come again?Mr. Mason's point -- theoretically at least a good one -- is that in spite of the recession, government hasn't drastically altered its mode of business. Politics and games still reign.On the state level, the governor threatens to chop emergency helicopter pilots or drafts a "doomsday budget," with sacrificial lambs he knows will never be sacrificed.
NEWS
By Darren M. Allen and Darren M. Allen,Sun Staff Writer | June 18, 1995
John Kotmair and his band of no-tax radicals have for more than a decade declared an ideological war on the Internal Revenue Service, the Federal Reserve, the Democrats, the Republicans, the police and just about anybody else on the public payroll.Taxes? Illegal. The nation's currency? Worthless. Most politicians? Sellouts.From a cramped office in Westminster, Mr. Kotmair is Maryland's version of the anti-tax, anti-government rebels that have won so much attention since the Oklahoma City bombing.
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