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By Kathleen Parker | February 18, 2010
In a time of constant calamity and crisis fatigue, proposed legislation in Uganda to execute gays passes through the American consciousness with the impact of a weather report. Corrupt politicians count on the brevity of the American attention span, but certain items demand a tap of the pause button. How exactly does the idea of executing gays evolve in a majority-Christian nation? Gays in Uganda already face imprisonment for up to 14 years. Under a new bill proposed last October by David Bahati, the government could execute HIV-positive men and jail people who don't report homosexual activities.
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By Michael Gold and The Baltimore Sun | January 17, 2014
Add "Star Trek" star Chris Pine to a growing list of people speaking out against Russia's controversial anti-gay law. The legislation ostensibly bans the promotion of "nontraditional sexual relations to minors" and has been responsible for a rise in anti-gay violence.  While making the rounds to promote his latest movie, Hollywood hunk Pine dubbed the legislation as "clearly awful, archaic, hostile nonsense. " Swoon. More notably, Pine criticized the U.S. response to Russia's crackdown on gay rights, saying "I think we should do more than just send gay Olympians there.
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NEWS
By Gregory Kane | January 13, 2001
JUST WHEN A GUY gets back from vacation and figures it's safe to pick up a newspaper again, what's he greeted with? A passel of letters to the editor, railing against one Paul T. Graziano, Baltimore's housing commissioner and a man with a drinking problem. Graziano is on a paid 30-day leave of absence while he is getting inpatient alcohol treatment. On the night of Dec. 28, he was in a Fells Point bar thundering against "fags" when he was asked to leave. He refused. Bar employees called police, who again asked the apparently inebriated Graziano to leave.
FEATURES
By Michael Gold and The Baltimore Sun | September 26, 2013
In news as infuriating as it is unsurprising, International Olympic Committee officials said Thursday they were "fully satisfied" that a Russian law barring gay propaganda doesn't violate the Olympic charter's anti-discrimination language, the Washington Post reports . To repeat: A law engineered under the auspices of preventing gay and lesbian individuals from indoctrinating the youth (I'm reading between the lines here) both in person and through the media is apparently consistent with the Olympic Charter's language on discrimination.
NEWS
By Suzanne Loudermilk and Suzanne Loudermilk,SUN STAFF | October 23, 1998
Almost 200 students, faculty and staff gathered at Goucher College last night to protest anti-gay sentiments that have been scrawled recently in the college's four dormitories."
NEWS
By David Simon and David Simon,Staff Writer Staff Writers Richard Irwin and Ann LoLordo contributed to this article | June 19, 1992
Despite the denials of two men charged in the incident, Southeastern District officers said last night they still believe anti-gay violence was the root cause of an attack on a teen-age boy near Patterson Park late Wednesday."
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | October 4, 1992
PORTLAND, Ore. -- Hardly a week goes by that Tom Potte does not receive either a death threat on the phone or a nasty letter in the mail. As police chief of Oregon's largest city, Mr. Potter said he had come to expect that a small number of people would always hate police officers.What has surprised him is learning how many people also profess to hate homosexuals. The reason Chief Potter knows is that his daughter, Katie, is an officer in his department and a lesbian. And he has supported her by marching with her in two gay pride parades in Portland.
NEWS
By Gady A. Epstein and Gady A. Epstein,SUN STAFF | February 7, 2001
Baltimore Housing Commissioner Paul T. Graziano returned to his job yesterday as he and the O'Malley administration continue trying to mend their relationships with gay and lesbian leaders, many of whom were calling for his resignation little more than a month ago. Appearing refreshed and confident, Graziano faced the media at the housing agency's offices near City Hall on the morning of his first day back from a monthlong paid leave for alcohol treatment....
NEWS
By Gady A. Epstein and Caitlin Francke and Gady A. Epstein and Caitlin Francke,SUN STAFF | December 30, 2000
The city's new housing commissioner was arrested early yesterday morning at a Fells Point bar where he made loud homophobic remarks and refused to leave even after police ordered him out, witnesses and police said. Paul T. Graziano, who was named in October and sworn in Dec. 4, told patrons this "whole place is full of fags" and made sexually graphic comments to two men he apparently thought were homosexual, according to interviews and the arrest report. At a news conference yesterday afternoon with Mayor Martin O'Malley, Graziano said he had "blacked out" during the entire incident at Bertha's and apologized profusely.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | February 18, 1994
Randy Shilts, the author of best-selling books on AIDS and gay issues and a newspaper reporter for the San Francisco Chronicle, died yesterday at his home in Guerneville, Calif. He was 42 and also had a home in San Francisco.The cause was AIDS, said Linda Alband, his assistant.Mr. Shilts was one of the first journalists to recognize AIDS as an important national issue. In the early 1980s he persuaded the Chronicle to let him report on AIDS full-time.His work resulted in the widely acclaimed 1987 book "And the Band Played On: Politics, People and the AIDS Epidemic."
FEATURES
By Michael Gold and The Baltimore Sun | August 18, 2013
Let's start with facts: Two members of the Russian women's 4x400-meter relay team, Kseniya Ryzhova and Tatyana Firova, kissed on the podium after their team won gold Saturday at the World Athletics Championship in Moscow. The smooch sparked a huge response, with many on Twitter and in several media outlets (especially Spanish-language ones, judging by my search last night) framing it as a protest against Russia's "gay propaganda" law. It may have been a stand of solidarity with the LGBT community.
FEATURES
By Michael Gold and The Baltimore Sun | August 14, 2013
After Nick Symmonds won a silver medal at the World Athletics Championships in Moscow, the American distance runner became the first foreign athlete to openly condemn Russia's anti-gay law on Russian soil. And so far, for what it's worth, he hasn't been incarcerated. On Tuesday, Symmonds took second in the 800-meter final and dedicated his finish to LGBT friends in America, according to Russian news outlet R-Sport . "As much as I can speak out about it, I believe that all humans deserve equality as however God made them," he said to R-Sport.
FEATURES
By Michael Gold and The Baltimore Sun | August 13, 2013
Likely sensing that uproar over Russia's anti-gay law isn't going away, FIFA says it has asked Russia for "clarification and more details" about the country's law ahead of the 2018 World Cup being held there, the Associated Press reports . Smart move, given how the International Olympic Committee has yet to receive a definitive answer from Russian officials about how the law will be enforced at the Sochi Winter Olympics in February. In a statement, FIFA says it has "zero tolerance against discrimination.
FEATURES
By Michael Gold and The Baltimore Sun | August 7, 2013
LGBT advocacy group All Out is set to deliver a petition Wednesday afternoon that asks the International Olympic Committee (IOC) to condemn Russia's anti-LGBT legislation as the 2014 Olympic Games in Sochi approach. In a statement, All Out says it has collected more than 300,000 signatures, including thousands from Athlete Ally members like Greg Louganis and former Ravens linebacker Brendon Ayanbadejo and several former Olympians. "We hope the International Olympic Committee responds to All Out's members and the millions of people worldwide who want Russia to treat all of their citizens with dignity under the law," said Anastasia Smirnova, from the Russian LGBT Network in St. Petersburg.
FEATURES
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | August 7, 2013
In a broad-ranging interview on "The Tonight Show With Jay Leno" on Tuesday night, President Barack Obama addressed Russia's recently passed anti-gay laws by saying he has "no patience for countries that try to treat gays or lesbians or transgender persons in ways that intimidate them or are harmful to them. " The comments come about six months before the Winter Olympics in Sochi, Russia -- a global event that has increased the amount of international attention being paid to Russia's new laws, one of which makes it illegal to spread "propaganda of nontraditional sexual relations.
FEATURES
By Michael Gold and The Baltimore Sun | August 2, 2013
Despite previous assurances from the International Olympic Committee, Russian Sports Minister Vitaly Mutko said that athletes and spectators at the 2014 Sochi Winter Olympics could be arrested for violating Russia's anti-LGBT propaganda law. "No one is forbidding an athlete with non-traditional sexual orientation from coming to Sochi, but if he goes onto the street and starts propagandizing it, then of course he will be held accountable," ...
NEWS
By Gabriel Rotello | September 14, 1994
RESEARCHERS from Harvard University and the Center for Health Policy in Washington published a study last week reporting that close to 20 percent of American men and women have had homosexual experiences or felt homosexual attractions since adolescence. The last time we heard about a study attempting to measure homosexuality in America, researchers from the Guttmacher Institute were reporting that just 1 percent of the male population was gay, so you might wonder what's going on here.The answer is definitions, or lack of them.
NEWS
By Ellen Uzelac and Ellen Uzelac,Special to the Sun | May 15, 1994
RENO, Nev. -- Twenty-five years after the Stonewall riots in New York City marked the start of the nation's gay liberation movement, conservatives in more than a half-dozen states are pushing anti-gay ballot initiatives that homosexuals say would turn back the clock.The National Gay & Lesbian Task Force has deemed the threat so crucial that it has declared the campaign its utmost priority and has dispatched four field officers across the country to serve as consultants to local gay rights groups.
FEATURES
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | August 1, 2013
Those suggesting a boycott of the upcoming Winter Olympics in Sochi, Russia due to the country's recent passage of draconian anti-gay laws should reconsider. It's clear from the decades-long gay rights movement here in the United States that gays and lesbians have always changed hearts and minds and forced public policy changes by being counted, not by sitting it out. The gay community here has won key rights, including marriage in more than a dozen states like Maryland , not by refusing to participate in the political and legal systems that have discriminated against them, but by getting smart and using those systems to their own advantage.
FEATURES
By Michael Gold and The Baltimore Sun | July 27, 2013
As concern grows over how Russia's anti-gay laws might affect the upcoming winter Olympics, NBC Sports executive Mark Lazarus told members of the press that the network will "address those issues as they are relevant at the time of the Games, as has always been done by NBC's coverage. " Given NBC's near-invisible coverage of China's human rights issues were in Beijing in 2008, don't consider me reassured. Especially since Lazarus later said that NBC would cover the Russian law if it is "impacting any part of the Olympic games," a scenario that seems unlikely unless Russian authorities head into the Olympic Village and start imprisoning LGBT athletes.
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