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NEWS
By Laura Vozzella and Del Quentin Wilber and Laura Vozzella and Del Quentin Wilber,SUN STAFF | January 8, 2003
In a legal memo expected to land at City Hall in a matter of days, attorney Johnnie L. Cochran Jr. will claim the city bears responsibility for the October arson murder of an East Baltimore family - in part because the anti-drug "Baltimore Believe" campaign encouraged residents to speak out against dealers, a lawyer working with Cochran said yesterday. Cochran is representing relatives of the Dawson family, who prosecutors say were killed in retaliation for reporting neighborhood dealers to police.
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NEWS
By Laura Vozzella and Laura Vozzella,SUN STAFF | November 15, 2002
Baltimore Believe has inspired thousands to seek drug treatment, but more than two-thirds are still awaiting help, according to a report to be released today on the first five months of the anti-drug campaign. That mix of good news and bad can be found throughout the 39-page progress report -- an indication, Believe officials say, that the $2.1 million campaign has made a dent in the city's drug problem but still has a long way to go. "I think it's good information. I don't think it's anything to declare victory over," said Walter D. "Wally" Pinkard, co-chairman of the campaign.
NEWS
By Paul Richter and Paul Richter,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 21, 2002
WASHINGTON - Pointing to the need to redirect resources to the war on terrorism, the Pentagon has quietly decided to scale back its effort to combat international drug trafficking, a central element of the national "war on drugs" for 14 years. Officials are weighing how exactly to pare the $1 billion-a-year program, but they want to reduce deployment of special operations troops on counter-narcotics missions and cut back the military's training of anti-drug police and soldiers in the United States and abroad.
NEWS
October 8, 2002
In a campaign to help reduce student drug use, cable television channels will air $1 million in free anti-drug public service announcements in the next year. The Cable Telecommunications Association of Maryland, Delaware and the District of Columbia announced yesterday that it is working with the Maryland attorney general's office and the Maryland State Department of Education on the campaign. Public and private school students in kindergarten through 12th grade throughout the state will be encouraged to create artwork to share their anti-drug message.
NEWS
By Jennifer McMenamin and Jennifer McMenamin,SUN STAFF | September 30, 2002
After her eldest son died of a heroin overdose 3 1/2 years ago, Thomasina Piercy knew she had to do something to fight teen drug use. Last school year, she introduced a compelling drug-awareness program at all three dozen of Carroll County's back-to-school nights. This year, she knew she had to do more. So she set up a 24-hour crisis hot line for students. "Michael tried to call me that night," she said of the cold evening in March 1999 when 19-year-old Michael DePinto died of an overdose.
NEWS
By Jennifer McMenamin and Jennifer McMenamin,SUN STAFF | September 30, 2002
After her eldest son died of a heroin overdose 3 1/2 years ago, Thomasina Piercy knew she had to do something to fight teen drug use. Last school year, she introduced a compelling drug-awareness program at all three dozen of Carroll County's back-to-school nights. This year, she knew she had to do more. So she set up a 24-hour crisis hot line for students. "Michael tried to call me that night," she said of the cold evening in March 1999 when 19-year-old Michael DePinto died of an overdose.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | July 27, 2002
Race car driver Jimmy Spencer is best known for his nickname, "Mr. Excitement," and his motto, "Jimmy Spencer never forgets." It means other drivers will pay for actions that negatively affect him on the racetrack. He is not exactly the first guy you would pick out of a crowd to speak about parenting and what it takes to be successful at raising children. But he's doing just that during this Winston Cup season, which continues tomorrow in Long Pond, Pa., with the Pennsylvania 500. Yesterday, he qualified 35th and Bill Elliott won the pole.
NEWS
By Laura Vozzella and Laura Vozzella,SUN STAFF | July 26, 2002
Mayor Martin O'Malley's plan for court watchdogs to monitor gun cases has a seat-of-the-pants quality you'd expect from a brash, young politician: unorthodox and aggressive, announced to a throng of media just two hours after the chance placement of newspaper articles put the idea in his head. But in some ways, O'Malley has been slowly laying the foundation for this kind of move throughout his 2 1/2 years in office, as he has tried to build community coalitions to help put his ideas into action.
NEWS
By Andrew A. Green and Andrew A. Green,SUN STAFF | June 19, 2002
Baltimore may believe, but the Baltimore County Council has its doubts. Asked at its meeting Monday night to support the high-profile Baltimore Believe anti-drug campaign in the city with a $5,000 grant, the council refused, saying the advertisements and billboards are a waste of money that could be better used on drug treatment programs. Yesterday, County Executive C.A. Dutch Ruppersberger scrambled to get the three councilmen who voted against the grant to change their minds, acknowledging that he had made a mistake in not explaining its importance thoroughly.
FEATURES
By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,SUN STAFF | April 17, 2002
Reefer Madness. Just Say No. This is Your Brain on Drugs. Take a Bite Out of Crime. Friends Don't Let Friends Drive Drunk. D.A.R.E. to Keep Kids Off Drugs. M.A.D.D. Ecstasy: Where's the Love? Baltimore Believe. Get the messages? Or just remember the slogans and acronyms? For decades, government agencies and community groups have spent billions on anti-drug advertising - Congress alone has allocated $1 billion over the next five years for such an effort. But do anti-drug, anti-crime, anti-anything campaigns change unhealthy and illegal behavior after the stark billboards come down and the scary public service announcements stop airing?
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