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NEWS
July 19, 1991
About 1,000 people, mostly youths, are expected to march tomorrow morning in an anti-drug parade through the streets of Annapolis.Thefourth annual Youth Alcohol and Other Drugs Awareness Parade and Rally will kick off at 9:30 a.m. at the Stanton Community Center on WestWashington Street.The parade will wind its way to Griscom Field on Hilltop Lane, where a rally featuring Gov. William Donald Schaefer is scheduled.Also during the rally, the executive director of the Governor's Drug and Alcohol Abuse Commission, Floyd Pond, will award $40,000 to the county's Planning Action Committee for its grass-roots prevention activities for high-risk youth.
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NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | August 7, 2014
A well-known anti-drug advocate is calling for Baltimore's Moonrise Festival to be canceled after a series of arrests and overdoses at electric dance music concerts, including two deaths linked to a recent event at Merriweather Post Pavilion in Columbia. "This is happening all over the country. Kids are ending up in the hospital, dying or getting arrested," said Mike Gimbel, former director of Baltimore County's substance abuse office. "It's not just Merriweather. This is a really scary situation right now. I don't see anybody really responding to it. " (A letter from Gimbel on the subject also appears on today's editorial page.)
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FEATURES
By Sandra Mathers and Sandra Mathers,Orlando Sentinel | January 11, 1994
For years, Debra Wert kept most of her ideas for children's stories filed away in her head.It took just one episode of "World News Tonight With Peter Jennings" back in 1987 to convince the former insurance company sales representative it was time to start writing.Ms. Wert, then 33, quit her job, moved in with her parents, pulled out a notebook and started her first book . . . in longhand.Today, the Longwood, Fla., children's author is on her way to becoming a publishing Wunderkind."Mac's Choice" didn't exactly hit the bookstores when it was printed five years ago, but it did make it into a few school systems in Virginia and Maryland.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | April 11, 2014
The sniffling began about 15 minutes into Chris Herren's speech. As the former NBA player recounted his battle with drug addiction, students throughout Southern High School's auditorium looked around to see who was crying. No one needed to look far. For the past four years, Herren — whose story of substance abuse was the subject of a 2011 ESPN documentary, "Unguarded" — has moved crowds with his gritty message at high schools, colleges and prisons nationwide. His talk at Southern High came at a time when county police say they're dealing with an increase in heroin use. Since the start of year, Anne Arundel County has seen 17 fatal drug overdoses — 13 of them involving heroin — according to county police spokesman Justin Mulcahy.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | June 9, 1997
A regional association of cable television systems will provide air time worth about $1 million in the next year to run anti-drug advertisements, the group is expected to announce today.The Cable Telecommunications Association of Maryland, Delaware and the District of Columbia has agreed to run the public service announcements for the Partnership for a Drug-Free Maryland."We are happy to lend our support to help fight the battle against drug use in Maryland," said Wayne O'Dell, president of the association.
NEWS
By Rafael Alvarez and Rafael Alvarez,SUN STAFF | October 29, 1996
The director of President Clinton's anti-drug policy was in Baltimore yesterday, meeting with grade-school children and telling community leaders that urban America is "seeing more tragedy than you deserve."Retired Gen. Barry R. McCaffrey -- who led U.S. assaults along the banks of the Euphrates River during the Persian Gulf war -- was the guest of Maryland Rep. Elijah E. Cummings, a 7th District Democrat. After pinning reduction of cocaine use in the United States to the administration's efforts to get Peruvian peasants to grow something other than coca, McCaffrey took questions from the crowd at Liberty Medical Center.
NEWS
By JoAnna Daemmrich and JoAnna Daemmrich,Staff writer | February 17, 1991
The offer was tempting. It sounded so easy, his chance to have plenty of cash, a new sports car and maybe one of those leather trench coats lined with fur.Darius Stanton was a senior in high school whenone of his buddies leaned over and whispered, "Man, I'm ready to make some serious money. You wanna join me?"For a minute, Stanton forgot his parents' stern warnings, forgot his fear of jail. Then, somehow, he found the courage to resist."I told him, 'Nah, that's all right man,'" he recalled.
FEATURES
By Winifred Walsh and Winifred Walsh,Evening Sun Staff | September 19, 1990
"Momma Don't," a gospel musical playing at the Lyric Oper House through Sunday, is part of the new national black theater phenomenon.But unlike its predecessors, including "Beauty Shop" and "Living Room," "Momma Don't" is not geared to just the black community. Although performed by an all-black cast, the play's anti-drug message is universal.Written, directed and produced by Michael Matthews, a singer and producer of the "Late Night Gospel Show" for WGPR-TV in Detroit, this play, like Matthews' previous production, "Wicked Ways," is based on his family's devastating experiences with crack addiction.
NEWS
By JOHN-JOHN WILLIAMS IV | December 2, 2005
High schools in Howard, Harford and Baltimore counties were among five in the state named Wednesday to receive $500 anti-drug and anti-alcohol grants under a program that encourages students and their parents to speak openly with each other about drug and alcohol use. The five schools are Atholton High in Howard County, C. Milton Wright High in Harford County, Duval High in Prince George's County, Loch Raven High in Baltimore County and Maurice J....
NEWS
By Mark Bomster and Mark Bomster,Staff Writer | October 15, 1992
In West Baltimore, young boys hold drugs for older dealers trying to insulate themselves from arrest.In the Pigtown section of Southwest Baltimore, glue-sniffing is a chronic juvenile drug problem.In Locust Point, police regularly break up beer parties among children in their early teens.Against that backdrop, seventh-graders at Francis Scott Key Middle School in South Baltimore spent a class period Tuesday crafting their own powerful anti-drug messages."I'm really against drugs, I don't like what's happening in society," 12-year-old Chris Brown said.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | July 26, 2012
As the search for Baltimore's next top cop plods along, at least one candidate appears to be openly campaigning for the post - and has a well-known supporter.  Stanford "Neill" Franklin, who had a 33-year law enforcement career in Maryland and is now executive director of a national group of police against drug prohibition , seems to want the job. A web article appeared this week featuring endorsements for Franklin , including one from...
SPORTS
By Jeff Barker, The Baltimore Sun | May 1, 2012
Former Major League Soccer midfielder Santino Quaranta has spoken before about a story that is both disturbing and uplifting -- signing with MLS when he was 16, battling abuse of cocaine and painkillers, becoming sober, returning to the game and playing for his country. But Quaranta said Tuesday's speech to about 650 Baltimore-area high school athletes was special. It was the largest crowd to hear his deeply personal message. It was delivered near where he was raised (he attended Archbishop Curley)
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | March 18, 2012
A Parkville High School senior donned a thick pair of what police call "drunk glasses. " As her classmates watched, she reeled, nearly stumbled and only missed hitting a pole because she had her hands outstretched. "It was crazy!" said Laura DeGuzman. "I couldn't see or focus. I couldn't tell where objects were. " The glasses, which simulate what it feels like to be legally drunk, were among the many props that Michael Gimbel, a substance abuse counselor, includes in his anti-drug presentations.
NEWS
July 7, 2011
I wish to comment on the article about the anti-smoking drug Chantix ("Stop-smoking pill called risky," July 5). It says that it is risky to healthy smoking middle-aged people. But I happen to know there are those who don't suffer from these side effects and are middle aged smokers. If the drug helps people stop smoking, then in my opinion the risk is worth it! People who smoke started taking risks the moment they picked up their first cigarette. I wish that the reporter had mentioned more success stories about the drug than non-success stories.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | July 4, 2011
A new study led by a Johns Hopkins researcher says the popular anti-smoking drug Chantix significantly increases the risk for a heart attack or other serious heart problem in healthy, middle-aged smokers. Dr. Sonal Singh, the study's lead author, is calling for warnings on the drug to be stronger than those currently required by the Food and Drug Administration. "People want to quit smoking to reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease, but in this case they're taking a drug that increases the risk for the very problems they're trying to avoid," said Singh, an assistant professor of general internal medicine.
NEWS
By Janene Holzberg and Janene Holzberg,Special to The Baltimore Sun | January 10, 2010
A new treatment for malaria - which experts say kills a child in Africa every 30 seconds - might lie in the dregs of medicinal tea formerly produced by an Ellicott City woman's company. Bad flavor might have undermined the lasting success of Diane Winn's first anti-malarial drug, a product called Phyto-Laria tea bags, which her company made until five years ago from the root of an African vine. But now, the only thing Winn hopes to taste is success as a flavorless capsule form of the same drug soon heads for clinical testing and, if approved, a product launch by year's end. Not bad for someone who graduated in 1959 with a degree in biology from tiny Cedar Crest College in Allentown, Pa., and who envisioned a long career behind a microscope or as a medical illustrator.
NEWS
By David L. Greene and David L. Greene,SUN STAFF | August 19, 1999
Organizers of an anti-drug event scheduled for tomorrow night at Westminster High School want parents to know they are encouraged to bring their children to learn about the dangers of heroin use.The Carroll County Council of PTAs is sponsoring the 7 p.m. town meeting, which will include a showing of the locally produced video "Heroin Kills" and a panel discussion involving local school officials, law enforcers and other drug experts.According to Bill Ullrich, the county PTA secretary, some parents are confusing tomorrow's event with an anti-drug forum to be held at the high school at 7 p.m. Sept.
NEWS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | March 4, 1998
Law enforcement officials, school administrators, an emergency room doctor, parents and students have organized an anti-drug forum at Westminster High School tomorrow."
NEWS
By CLARENCE PAGE | July 1, 2008
As if our military didn't have its hands full in Iraq and Afghanistan, the head of the Minuteman Project border security group, Jim Gilchrist, suggested in recent radio interviews that the U.S. give Mexico 12 months to corral its criminal drug cartels and rising violence, particularly in border towns, or deploy the Army to do the job. That's the Minutemen. Their remedies for the drug war next-door sound simplistic, but at least they're paying attention. While most of us north of the border have been absorbed with our presidential sweepstakes and other happenings, our southern neighbor has exploded into the full-scale drug violence previously associated with Colombia or Peru.
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