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NEWS
By Gady A. Epstein and Gady A. Epstein,SUN STAFF | June 23, 1998
When 62-year-old Solange Collen -- legally blind and living on Social Security and disability benefits -- found a small, no-frills place to rent in Columbia last summer, her son Steve was thrilled. The Columbia resident would have his mother close by, where he could help her get groceries and do other errands.But Collen was unable to move in to Clary's Crossing Apartments. She can't afford the $700-plus monthly rent without her federal Section 8 voucher, and the complex doesn't participate in the subsidized housing program -- even though a county anti-discrimination law essentially requires participation.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 2, 2014
As a supporter of the Fairness For All Marylander's Act, I want to thank The Sun for running Kevin Rector's article, "Transgender student named prom queen at Baltimore high school" (May 28). When Destiny Hartis graduates, leaves Baltimore and crosses over into Anne Arundel County to attend a nursing program, all of her basic rights will travel with her thanks to the Fairness For All Marylanders Act. Prior to this update to our anti-discrimination law, Ms. Harris would have lost the rights she had at home in Baltimore City the moment she crossed over into Anne Arundel County.
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NEWS
By Gary Gately and Gary Gately,Staff writer | August 9, 1991
An all-male Annapolis Elks lodge has voted to challenge a city law denying liquor licenses to clubs that bar women as members.Some 350 members of Elks Lodge 622 voted unanimously late Wednesday night tosue in county Circuit Court, Robert A. Dietz, spokesman for the lodge, said yesterday.Under the city anti-discrimination law, which took effect Jan. 1,the 1,500-member lodge would automatically lose its liquor license in April when it seeks renewal. Without revenue from liquor sales, thelodge could not survive, Dietz said.
NEWS
March 27, 2014
If this coming November Maryland Republicans look back at the election results and wonder what went wrong, they may want to start with Thursday's vote by the House of Delegates in which every member of their party in attendance voted against a bill to ban discrimination against transgender individuals in employment, housing and public accommodations. That's not a shock, but it's still a disappointment. It appears GOP delegates in the Free State are taking a cue from their right-wing peers in the U.S. House of Representatives and opposing equal accommodations for a group often targeted for violence and discrimination.
NEWS
By Gady A. Epstein and Gady A. Epstein,SUN STAFF | June 2, 1998
Lower-income people with housing subsidies can soon be turned away from apartment complexes that reach a 20 percent threshold of subsidized tenants, under a bill passed by the Howard County Council last night.On a 5-0 vote, the council scaled back a 6-year-old law that barred landlords from discriminating against prospective tenants with housing subsidies. Housing and human rights officials recommended the change, saying some landlords threatened to sue unless a limit on the number of subsidized tenants was allowed.
NEWS
June 2, 2014
As a supporter of the Fairness For All Marylander's Act, I want to thank The Sun for running Kevin Rector's article, "Transgender student named prom queen at Baltimore high school" (May 28). When Destiny Hartis graduates, leaves Baltimore and crosses over into Anne Arundel County to attend a nursing program, all of her basic rights will travel with her thanks to the Fairness For All Marylanders Act. Prior to this update to our anti-discrimination law, Ms. Harris would have lost the rights she had at home in Baltimore City the moment she crossed over into Anne Arundel County.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | December 5, 2011
Howard County has joined Montgomery County and Baltimore City as the third jurisdiction in the state to adopt a law prohibiting discrimination based on gender identity and expression. The Howard County Council's four Democrats voted in favor of legislation Monday night that bars discrimination in housing, employment, law enforcement, public accommodations and financing. The council began crafting the bill after a Baltimore County transgender woman was attacked at a Rosedale McDonald's last spring and the failure of the General Assembly to adopt a statewide anti-discrimination law. Several members of a local group, Parents, Families and Friends of Lesbians and Gays, sought the law "This is an important bill," said Councilwoman Courtney Watson, an Ellicott City Democrat, before casting her vote in favor of the bill.
EXPLORE
December 9, 2011
The new anti-discrimination law to protect transgendered individuals caused me to reflect upon the new pro-discrimination policies at the Columbia swim center and how we will decide who makes us "feel uncomfortable. " For example, how do we plan to define "female" for our new women-only swim times? If we define "woman" as "absence of a Y chromosome," we will discriminate against transgendered men who identify as women. If we define "woman" as "someone who does not identify as a man," we will discriminate against transgendered women, though they are genetically female.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | March 4, 2014
The Maryland Senate approved a bill Tuesday that would prohibit discrimination against transgender people. The Fairness for All Marylanders Act, which passed the Senate, 32-15, now goes to the House of Delegates. The measure would expand Maryland's anti-discrimination laws to protect transgender people in employment, housing, access to credit and public accommodations. Four localities — Baltimore City and Baltimore, Howard and Montgomery counties — already bar discrimination based on gender identity, but there is not a state law against it. "I think we're ready to move ahead and be progressive," said Sen. Delores G. Kelly, a Baltimore County Democrat, who argued that transgender civil rights ought to be protected statewide.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | November 20, 2011
After suffering a defeat in the state legislature, advocates pushing to bar discrimination against transgender people are looking to build protection into local laws - spurred on by a high-profile attack on a woman at a Baltimore County McDonald's last spring. On Monday, Howard County will become the latest local government to take up a bill that would add gender identity and expression to the county's anti-discrimination laws. The measure, which has the support of a majority of the County Council, would make Howard the third local government in Maryland to adopt such a measure.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | March 4, 2014
The Maryland Senate approved a bill Tuesday that would prohibit discrimination against transgender people. The Fairness for All Marylanders Act, which passed the Senate, 32-15, now goes to the House of Delegates. The measure would expand Maryland's anti-discrimination laws to protect transgender people in employment, housing, access to credit and public accommodations. Four localities — Baltimore City and Baltimore, Howard and Montgomery counties — already bar discrimination based on gender identity, but there is not a state law against it. "I think we're ready to move ahead and be progressive," said Sen. Delores G. Kelly, a Baltimore County Democrat, who argued that transgender civil rights ought to be protected statewide.
NEWS
June 6, 2012
If Maryland's resident pit bull, Sen. Barbara Mikulski, has demonstrated anything in her several decades in Congress and as dean of Senate women, it's a willingness to stand up for the less powerful in society, and she was at it again this week advocating for the Paycheck Fairness Act and the rights of women to secure equal pay for equal work. To the surprise of no one, Senate Republicans were unmoved by the cause and blocked the much-needed legislation from floor debate as it fell eight votes short of the 60 required.
NEWS
February 20, 2012
Tuesday night, the Baltimore County Council has a chance to send a powerful message about equality and fairness to all Marylanders when it votes on a bill to extend the county's anti-discrimination laws to cover transgender people. In the county where transgender woman Chrissy Lee Polis was savagely beaten in a McDonald's because of her gender identity, this should be a no-brainer. But it has instead become embroiled in an emotionally driven but largely irrelevant debate over access to public restrooms.
EXPLORE
December 9, 2011
The new anti-discrimination law to protect transgendered individuals caused me to reflect upon the new pro-discrimination policies at the Columbia swim center and how we will decide who makes us "feel uncomfortable. " For example, how do we plan to define "female" for our new women-only swim times? If we define "woman" as "absence of a Y chromosome," we will discriminate against transgendered men who identify as women. If we define "woman" as "someone who does not identify as a man," we will discriminate against transgendered women, though they are genetically female.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | December 5, 2011
Howard County has joined Montgomery County and Baltimore City as the third jurisdiction in the state to adopt a law prohibiting discrimination based on gender identity and expression. The Howard County Council's four Democrats voted in favor of legislation Monday night that bars discrimination in housing, employment, law enforcement, public accommodations and financing. The council began crafting the bill after a Baltimore County transgender woman was attacked at a Rosedale McDonald's last spring and the failure of the General Assembly to adopt a statewide anti-discrimination law. Several members of a local group, Parents, Families and Friends of Lesbians and Gays, sought the law "This is an important bill," said Councilwoman Courtney Watson, an Ellicott City Democrat, before casting her vote in favor of the bill.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | November 20, 2011
After suffering a defeat in the state legislature, advocates pushing to bar discrimination against transgender people are looking to build protection into local laws - spurred on by a high-profile attack on a woman at a Baltimore County McDonald's last spring. On Monday, Howard County will become the latest local government to take up a bill that would add gender identity and expression to the county's anti-discrimination laws. The measure, which has the support of a majority of the County Council, would make Howard the third local government in Maryland to adopt such a measure.
NEWS
February 20, 2012
Tuesday night, the Baltimore County Council has a chance to send a powerful message about equality and fairness to all Marylanders when it votes on a bill to extend the county's anti-discrimination laws to cover transgender people. In the county where transgender woman Chrissy Lee Polis was savagely beaten in a McDonald's because of her gender identity, this should be a no-brainer. But it has instead become embroiled in an emotionally driven but largely irrelevant debate over access to public restrooms.
NEWS
June 6, 2012
If Maryland's resident pit bull, Sen. Barbara Mikulski, has demonstrated anything in her several decades in Congress and as dean of Senate women, it's a willingness to stand up for the less powerful in society, and she was at it again this week advocating for the Paycheck Fairness Act and the rights of women to secure equal pay for equal work. To the surprise of no one, Senate Republicans were unmoved by the cause and blocked the much-needed legislation from floor debate as it fell eight votes short of the 60 required.
NEWS
By Jill Rosen, The Baltimore Sun | April 30, 2011
School kids call Catherine Hyde's teenage daughter "freak" and "pervert," or "homo. " She's forced to change for gym in a closet and use the teacher's restroom. Hyde knows her daughter, who was born male, has had it easy in a world where transgender people often lose their jobs, go homeless and suffer beatings. Yet after a brutal assault at a Rosedale McDonald's on another young transgender woman, she sees hope. Hyde, and others in Maryland who've in the past failed to persuade lawmakers to enact a law designed to protect transgender people, believe the attack and the attention it's drawn to the state will finally spur action.
FEATURES
By Michael Ollove and Michael Ollove,SUN STAFF | June 21, 2001
On a sticky Friday afternoon, an ample-sized man labors up Lombard Street, straining under the weight of a heavy cardboard box in his hands. A rectangular sign rests precariously atop the box and flies into the man's chest with the occasional gust of hot air. The sign says "takebackmaryland.org." The man, Tres Kerns, is a mishmash of visual cross-signals. His hair is almost completely white even though he is still an energetic 41. From the waist down, he is dressed for business in gray wool slacks and loafers, but above he is wearing a sweat-dampened T-shirt with a deep V-neck that reveals an expanse of pasty skin.
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