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By Knight-Ridder News Service | November 2, 1991
WASHINGTON -- With scant public debate, Congress all but decided yesterday to commit taxpayers this year to a $4 billion down payment for a ground-based "star wars" missile shield.The compromise $291 billion defense bill approved by Senate and House negotiators yesterday also allows President Bush to divert $1 billion of the military budget for humanitarian aid to the Soviet Union.The action on the bill also effectively halted the controversial B-2 bomber program, freezing production at the 15 planes already on order.
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 18, 2002
WASHINGTON - After nearly two decades of national debate over the wisdom and utility of trying to intercept missiles fired at the United States, President Bush ordered the Pentagon yesterday to field within two years a modest antimissile system. Bush's decision marked a major turning point in a debate that has consumed Washington and defense organizations since Ronald Reagan first announced a far more ambitious space-based missile shield. A year ago, Bush withdrew from a treaty signed in 1972 with the Soviet Union that banned such systems; his action yesterday was the first time the United States had actually moved to field such a system, even though its capabilities are far more limited than proponents once hoped and its reliability still in doubt.
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NEWS
November 2, 2001
THE TERRORIST attacks of Sept. 11 cured the Bush administration of its former unilateralist, "we are the only superpower" rhetoric. Secretary of Defense Donald Rumsfeld's delay of tests of the proposed missile shield, which would contravene the 1972 Anti-Ballistic Missile Treaty, was a welcome step taken in quest of a greater prize. It creates anticipation for the three-day visit of Russian President Vladimir Putin beginning Nov. 13. Hints have been dropped by both sides of a possible renegotiation of the ABM Treaty to permit the tests, along with reductions in warheads.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | December 13, 2001
WASHINGTON - As it scrambled to mount a global anti-terror coalition in the tense aftermath of the Sept. 11 attacks, the Bush administration seemed to be a sudden convert to the religion of international cooperation. But not anymore. Flush with military success in Afghanistan, the White House has taken a series of steps that mark a return to what critics in the United States and Europe call its "unilateralist," go-it-alone approach to world affairs. The most significant step is President Bush's decision, which might be officially announced today, to scrap the 1972 Anti-Ballistic Missile Treaty with Moscow.
NEWS
July 12, 2000
THE MISSILE killer didn't really fail its test over the Pacific early Saturday. Because two aspects of proven technology faltered, the targeting, sensors and communications that were to be tested were not. This was the third of 19 scheduled tests. The program is delayed, not derailed. That delay should put the ball in the next president's court. President Clinton wanted to get this irrevocably started, but cannot. The next step is for Secretary of Defense William Cohen to report to the Senate Armed Forces Committee.
NEWS
December 13, 2001
RENOUNCING the Anti-Ballistic Missile Treaty of 1972, with what is now Russia, is a bad idea whose time has come. Amending it would be better. When President Bush confided to congressional leaders yesterday that he would exercise Article XV of the treaty by giving six months' notice of pulling out, more were disappointed than surprised. The treaty was a cornerstone of arms control that brought stability to the Cold War. Other agreements were built upon it. Doing away with it introduces uncertainty about the rest of the relationship.
NEWS
March 22, 1999
BILLS passed by the House and Senate to concoct a defense against single intercontinental ballistic missiles are appealing. That's why the White House approved the Senate version, which gives lip service to arms control agreements with Russia. It's in keeping with the Clinton administration's strategy of adopting Republican ideas rather than fighting them.The vague legislation, lacking a price tag or technology certain to work, was made likely by North Korea's test of a three-stage rocket over Japan.
NEWS
July 16, 2001
THE BUSH administration appears too eager to violate the 1972 Anti-Ballistic Missile Treaty with Russia, just for the sake of ending it. Britain's foreign secretary, Jack Straw, agrees that potential dangers unforeseen by the treaty are arising. But he sees no hurry and withholds judgment on whether Britain needs a missile defense. Washington stands alone. The flight test last Saturday did not violate that treaty. It authorizes trying to hit a missile with a missile from White Sands, N.M, or Kwajalein in the Pacific.
NEWS
February 9, 2001
NATIONAL MISSILE defense is a costly idea that might work. It was tentatively endorsed by the Clinton administration, enthusiastically embraced by the Bush campaign and deserves further study. Unfortunately, it looms as centerpiece of the emerging Bush foreign policy. The program sprang from a committee chaired by Donald H. Rumsfeld that concluded the CIA had underestimated the time in which rogue states might be able to hit the United States with long-range missiles. Naming Mr. Rumsfeld defense secretary was President Bush's way of signaling his commitment to missile defense.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 23, 2001
MOSCOW - Undersecretary of State John Bolton said last night that "a vast open space" still exists for an agreement with Russia on joint development of a limited defense against ballistic missiles, but that the time for such an accord is running out. Bolton denied, however, that he had issued an unofficial deadline of November for reaching such an agreement. The New York Times reported yesterday, based on excerpts from an interview with a Moscow radio station, that Bolton had indicated the United States would declare its intention to withdraw from the 1972 Anti-Ballistic Missile Treaty unless Russia agreed to changes by November.
NEWS
December 13, 2001
RENOUNCING the Anti-Ballistic Missile Treaty of 1972, with what is now Russia, is a bad idea whose time has come. Amending it would be better. When President Bush confided to congressional leaders yesterday that he would exercise Article XV of the treaty by giving six months' notice of pulling out, more were disappointed than surprised. The treaty was a cornerstone of arms control that brought stability to the Cold War. Other agreements were built upon it. Doing away with it introduces uncertainty about the rest of the relationship.
NEWS
By David L. Greene and Mark Matthews and David L. Greene and Mark Matthews,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | November 16, 2001
CRAWFORD, Texas - Despite signs of a growing personal rapport, President Bush and President Vladimir V. Putin of Russia ended their three-day summit yesterday without an agreement on how the United States can proceed with the development of a missile defense system. "We have a difference of opinion," said Bush, who took Putin to Crawford High School near his ranch, where they fielded students' questions on issues ranging from Afghanistan to whether Putin enjoyed his Texas barbecue dinner.
NEWS
November 2, 2001
THE TERRORIST attacks of Sept. 11 cured the Bush administration of its former unilateralist, "we are the only superpower" rhetoric. Secretary of Defense Donald Rumsfeld's delay of tests of the proposed missile shield, which would contravene the 1972 Anti-Ballistic Missile Treaty, was a welcome step taken in quest of a greater prize. It creates anticipation for the three-day visit of Russian President Vladimir Putin beginning Nov. 13. Hints have been dropped by both sides of a possible renegotiation of the ABM Treaty to permit the tests, along with reductions in warheads.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | November 2, 2001
WASHINGTON - Determined to shore up world support for a prolonged war on terrorism, the White House has adopted a new flexibility toward the kind of international agreements it once disparaged. As President Bush prepares for a summit with Russian President Vladimir V. Putin starting Nov. 13, senior administration officials are signaling a willingness to continue abiding by the 1972 Anti-Ballistic Missile Treaty, at least for the time being. This would be part of a deal that would allow tests of a missile defense system, which Bush has made a top priority, and deep cuts in strategic nuclear weapons, which both sides favor.
TOPIC
October 28, 2001
The crisis The anthrax scare escalated. Two postal workers in a Washington mail facility died while many more were hospitalized. Part of the Hart Senate Office Building was closed. A State Department mail handler was hospitalized with the disease and the bacterium was found in mail handling facilities for the CIA and Supreme Court. An estimated 10,000 people are now taking anti-anthrax medicine. Bayer reached a deal with the U.S. government to provide Cipro at a low price Swiss Re, the largest insurer of the World Trade Center, sued the buildings' managers to limit its to $3.5 billion.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | October 26, 2001
WASHINGTON- In a goodwill gesture to Russia, the Bush administration announced yesterday that the United States was postponing several planned missile-defense tests. The decision comes as the two nations negotiate a new strategic arms agreement and President Bush prepares to welcome Russian President Vladimir V. Putin to Washington and his Texas ranch next month. In making the announcement, Secretary of Defense Donald Rumsfeld said the U.S. missile-defense program had reached the point where it could violate the Anti-ballistic Missile Treaty between the United States and Russia.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | July 12, 1992
WASHINGTON -- In an effort to persuade Russia to agree to a joint deployment of anti-missile defenses, the Bush administration is sending a team of high-ranking officials to Moscow today.The trip, arranged during the summit meeting last month between President Bush and President Boris N. Yeltsin, is being led by Dennis B. Ross, the head of the State Department's Policy Planning Staff, and includes officials from the Pentagon, the Arms Control and Disarmament Agency and the National Security Council staff.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 28, 2001
WASHINGTON - Hoping to slow the Bush administration's missile defense program, several environmental groups plan to file a lawsuit today asserting that the Pentagon's plans for a missile defense test range in the Pacific will violate federal environmental rules. The suit, to be filed in U.S. District Court here, contends the Pentagon must conduct a detailed analysis of the environmental impact of missile testing on Alaska, Hawaii, California and other places in the proposed test range.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 28, 2001
WASHINGTON - Hoping to slow the Bush administration's missile defense program, several environmental groups plan to file a lawsuit today asserting that the Pentagon's plans for a missile defense test range in the Pacific will violate federal environmental rules. The suit, to be filed in U.S. District Court here, contends the Pentagon must conduct a detailed analysis of the environmental impact of missile testing on Alaska, Hawaii, California and other places in the proposed test range.
NEWS
By Michael O'Hanlon | August 28, 2001
WASHINGTON - It is increasingly clear that Russia and the United States are headed for a major arms control breakdown over the subject of national missile defense. That could have serious implications for their ability to cooperate on other security issues as well, such as efforts to consolidate and secure Russia's vast inventory of nuclear weapons and materials. American security could suffer as a result. The Bush administration rightly wants out of the 1972 Anti-Ballistic Missile Treaty that bans all national missile defense.
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