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NEWS
October 23, 2005
1774: TEA PARTY WARNING On Oct. 19, 1774, Anthony Stewart of Annapolis burned his own ship, sending the British a strong signal that Marylanders could have their own version of the Boston Tea Party. The Peggy Stewart, named for Anthony Stewart's daughter, was loaded with 2,000 pounds of tea when it arrived at Annapolis harbor. Anthony Stewart thought he would pay the tax on the tea and have it quietly moved ashore, but soon the word of his intentions got out. Citizens became angry and gathered at the harbor.
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FEATURES
By Leah Polakoff, The Baltimore Sun | May 16, 2013
Tucked away in the state's capital, adjacent to the Naval Academy, sits the Peggy Stewart House, a historic house that played an important role in the American Revolution and was home at different times to a signer of the Constitution and a signer of the Declaration of Independence. The Georgian-style home, built in the 1760s and designated a National Historic Landmark, is on the market for $3.2 million. The remodeled home at 207 Hanover St. has five bedrooms, 31/2 bathrooms, six fireplaces and an eight-car garage.
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NEWS
By Robert M. Pennington of the Ann Arrundell County Historical Society | March 26, 1995
75 Years Ago* Work is expected to start soon on the Clairborne Road. Nothing but concrete will be used. The newly surfaced road is expected to double traffic between Annapolis and Baltimore. -- The Sun, May 3, 1920.* An increase in teacher salaries is being urged by George Fox, Anne Arundel County superintendent of schools. The average teacher's salary was $480 in 1916 and the present year will bring it to $700, the third highest in the state. -- The Sun, May 10, 1920.* William H. Johnson, born a slave on the Stewart plantation in Anne Arundel County, died at the age of 105. The Stewart plantation was owned by a descendant of Anthony Stewart, owner of the brig Peggy Stewart, which was burned in Annapolis harbor because of its hated cargo of tea. -- The Sun, May 13, 1920.
NEWS
October 30, 2005
1774: The burning of the `Peggy Stewart' On Oct. 19, 1774, a number of Howard County patriots -- including Dr. Evan W. Warfield and Capt. Thomas Hobbs -- rode to Annapolis after learning that the brig Peggy Stewart had entered that city's harbor laden with tea, according to an account by Jean Warfield Kennan. "The colonists had agreed not to import tea, which was one of the commodities on which they were highly taxed," Kennan wrote in Howard's Roads to the Past. "They confronted the owner of the brig, Anthony Stewart, and gave him the choice of burning his brand new ship or being hanged."
NEWS
February 15, 2004
On February 13, 2004, LOTTIE GERTRUDE HAWKINS-STEWART; beloved mother of Stephanie Hawkins and Lisha Phipps; wife of Anthony Stewart; devoted grandmother of Lauren, Secilie, Samuel, Sydney and Gregory, Jr; loving sister of Reginald, Robert, Jr., Evelyn, Vivian, Dorothy, Russell, Rhonda and Andrea. She is also survived by two aunts Bertha and Allustus, stepchildren, Renee, Ursula and Kevin, nine step grandchildren and a host of in-laws, other relatives and friends. On Monday friends may call at THE NEW VAUGHN C. GREENE FUNERAL SERVICES (Randallstown)
NEWS
October 30, 2005
1774: The burning of the `Peggy Stewart' On Oct. 19, 1774, a number of Howard County patriots -- including Dr. Evan W. Warfield and Capt. Thomas Hobbs -- rode to Annapolis after learning that the brig Peggy Stewart had entered that city's harbor laden with tea, according to an account by Jean Warfield Kennan. "The colonists had agreed not to import tea, which was one of the commodities on which they were highly taxed," Kennan wrote in Howard's Roads to the Past. "They confronted the owner of the brig, Anthony Stewart, and gave him the choice of burning his brand new ship or being hanged."
FEATURES
By Leah Polakoff, The Baltimore Sun | May 16, 2013
Tucked away in the state's capital, adjacent to the Naval Academy, sits the Peggy Stewart House, a historic house that played an important role in the American Revolution and was home at different times to a signer of the Constitution and a signer of the Declaration of Independence. The Georgian-style home, built in the 1760s and designated a National Historic Landmark, is on the market for $3.2 million. The remodeled home at 207 Hanover St. has five bedrooms, 31/2 bathrooms, six fireplaces and an eight-car garage.
SPORTS
By Paul McMullen | February 14, 1991
Snow's in the forecast and postseason basketball tournaments begin in two weeks. Sounds like a good time to think about soccer.Cost-containment measures passed at the NCAA Convention last month mean scheduling cutbacks for all of the so-called minor sports. Soccer teams were allowed 22 regular-season games last year, but in 1991 they will be limited to 20, and the two foes cut from Loyola's schedule are Towson State and UMBC.Greyhounds coach Bill Sento said he liked the local rivalries because of the savings in expenses and the interest they generate.
NEWS
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,SUN STAFF | August 29, 1999
The year was 1774 when an angry mob gathered outside a grand house on the Annapolis waterfront, erecting a gallows at the front door for owner Anthony Stewart -- a threat to hang the merchant if he refused to destroy his ship and its cargo of 2,320 pounds of English tea.As the story goes, Stewart paced the hardwood floors of his home, the crowd outside growing angrier and louder, while his wife struggled to give birth in an upstairs bedroom. Finally, he agreed to torch his ship, the Peggy Stewart, echoing the 1773 Boston Tea Party and galvanizing Maryland patriots in the fight for freedom.
NEWS
February 23, 2005
On Sunday, February 20, 2005, NATALIE WEIL (nee Lieberman), loving wife of Paul Weil; beloved mother of Joanne M. Stewart of Atlanta, GA, Kenneth T. Weil of Sykesville, MD and Jennifer M. Weil of Philadelphia, PA; mother-in-law of Anthony Stewart and Constance Weil; beloved sister of Dolly Joseph Friedman of West Palm Beach, FL. Services and interment on Wednesday, February 23, 3 P.M. at Baltimore Hebrew, Berrymans Lane. Please omit flowers. Contributions may be directed in her name to the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society of America, 8600 La Salle Road, Suite 314, Chester Bldg.
NEWS
October 23, 2005
1774: TEA PARTY WARNING On Oct. 19, 1774, Anthony Stewart of Annapolis burned his own ship, sending the British a strong signal that Marylanders could have their own version of the Boston Tea Party. The Peggy Stewart, named for Anthony Stewart's daughter, was loaded with 2,000 pounds of tea when it arrived at Annapolis harbor. Anthony Stewart thought he would pay the tax on the tea and have it quietly moved ashore, but soon the word of his intentions got out. Citizens became angry and gathered at the harbor.
NEWS
February 15, 2004
On February 13, 2004, LOTTIE GERTRUDE HAWKINS-STEWART; beloved mother of Stephanie Hawkins and Lisha Phipps; wife of Anthony Stewart; devoted grandmother of Lauren, Secilie, Samuel, Sydney and Gregory, Jr; loving sister of Reginald, Robert, Jr., Evelyn, Vivian, Dorothy, Russell, Rhonda and Andrea. She is also survived by two aunts Bertha and Allustus, stepchildren, Renee, Ursula and Kevin, nine step grandchildren and a host of in-laws, other relatives and friends. On Monday friends may call at THE NEW VAUGHN C. GREENE FUNERAL SERVICES (Randallstown)
NEWS
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,SUN STAFF | August 29, 1999
The year was 1774 when an angry mob gathered outside a grand house on the Annapolis waterfront, erecting a gallows at the front door for owner Anthony Stewart -- a threat to hang the merchant if he refused to destroy his ship and its cargo of 2,320 pounds of English tea.As the story goes, Stewart paced the hardwood floors of his home, the crowd outside growing angrier and louder, while his wife struggled to give birth in an upstairs bedroom. Finally, he agreed to torch his ship, the Peggy Stewart, echoing the 1773 Boston Tea Party and galvanizing Maryland patriots in the fight for freedom.
NEWS
By Robert M. Pennington of the Ann Arrundell County Historical Society | March 26, 1995
75 Years Ago* Work is expected to start soon on the Clairborne Road. Nothing but concrete will be used. The newly surfaced road is expected to double traffic between Annapolis and Baltimore. -- The Sun, May 3, 1920.* An increase in teacher salaries is being urged by George Fox, Anne Arundel County superintendent of schools. The average teacher's salary was $480 in 1916 and the present year will bring it to $700, the third highest in the state. -- The Sun, May 10, 1920.* William H. Johnson, born a slave on the Stewart plantation in Anne Arundel County, died at the age of 105. The Stewart plantation was owned by a descendant of Anthony Stewart, owner of the brig Peggy Stewart, which was burned in Annapolis harbor because of its hated cargo of tea. -- The Sun, May 13, 1920.
SPORTS
By Paul McMullen | February 14, 1991
Snow's in the forecast and postseason basketball tournaments begin in two weeks. Sounds like a good time to think about soccer.Cost-containment measures passed at the NCAA Convention last month mean scheduling cutbacks for all of the so-called minor sports. Soccer teams were allowed 22 regular-season games last year, but in 1991 they will be limited to 20, and the two foes cut from Loyola's schedule are Towson State and UMBC.Greyhounds coach Bill Sento said he liked the local rivalries because of the savings in expenses and the interest they generate.
NEWS
By Bill Talbott and Bill Talbott,Sun Staff Writer | March 24, 1995
...TC A 5-year-old Carrollton boy remained in fair condition yesterday afternoon at the Johns Hopkins Children's Center after he was ejected from a relative's automobile on Route 140 at Reese Road Wednesday night.Five other people involved in the three-car crash were treated and released from Carroll County General Hospital.Police said Andrew Ashburn of the 2300 block of Carrollton Road was ejected from the 1990 Plymouth Acclaim driven by Nancy Baker Ashburn, 42.The boy was not restrained in a child safety seat or wearing a seat belt, police said.
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