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NEWS
September 6, 1991
Thomas Anthony Perkins Sr., died of cancer Aug. 28 at the Greater Baltimore Medical Center. The former resident of Hampden and Arbutus was 78.A memorial service for Mr. Perkins will be held at 8:30 a.m. tomorrow at Woodlawn Cemetery, 2130 Woodlawn Drive.Mr. Perkins worked for nearly 30 years as a warehouseman for the Charles E. Hires Bottling Co. until the business left Baltimore in the late 1950s. He then worked for Western Auto Supply Co. until he retired in 1972 and moved to Holiday, Fla.Mr.
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NEWS
July 12, 2009
On July 7, 2009, PAULINE PERKINS. She is survived by one daughter, Leona Douglass; one granddaughter, Fern Perkins Lockhart; one step-granddaughter, Jerisa Carter Perkins; three grandsons: Richard Hart, Curtis Douglass III, and Jesse Douglass; one step-grandson, Anthony Perkins; three great grandchildren: Fern S. O'Neal, Christopher S. Lockhard, and Logan Douglass; two great-great grandchildren: Ronald A. O'Neal, and Malia C. Lockhart; two nieces: Phyllis...
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By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,SUN STAFF | December 6, 1998
The suits at Universal are doubtless hoping that lightning will strike twice with "Psycho," director Gus Van Sant's much-hyped remake of the Alfred Hitchcock groundbreaker that earned a ton of money for Paramount back in 1960.Van Sant certainly wouldn't mind either - what director doesn't yearn to be called a genius? And Anne Heche (cast here as Marion Crane) probably wouldn't mind a career as long and as steady as her predecessor in that fatal shower, Janet Leigh.But at least one person associated with "Psycho" 1998 probably would prefer that history not repeat itself.
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By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,SUN STAFF | December 6, 1998
The suits at Universal are doubtless hoping that lightning will strike twice with "Psycho," director Gus Van Sant's much-hyped remake of the Alfred Hitchcock groundbreaker that earned a ton of money for Paramount back in 1960.Van Sant certainly wouldn't mind either - what director doesn't yearn to be called a genius? And Anne Heche (cast here as Marion Crane) probably wouldn't mind a career as long and as steady as her predecessor in that fatal shower, Janet Leigh.But at least one person associated with "Psycho" 1998 probably would prefer that history not repeat itself.
NEWS
July 12, 2009
On July 7, 2009, PAULINE PERKINS. She is survived by one daughter, Leona Douglass; one granddaughter, Fern Perkins Lockhart; one step-granddaughter, Jerisa Carter Perkins; three grandsons: Richard Hart, Curtis Douglass III, and Jesse Douglass; one step-grandson, Anthony Perkins; three great grandchildren: Fern S. O'Neal, Christopher S. Lockhard, and Logan Douglass; two great-great grandchildren: Ronald A. O'Neal, and Malia C. Lockhart; two nieces: Phyllis...
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By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | September 14, 1992
"A boy's best friend is his mother," Norman Bates says earnestly in Alfred Hitchcock's "Psycho," but Anthony Perkins, who played Norman and who died Saturday in California at 60, would not agree.Anthony Perkins' best friend was Norman Bates. Or maybe Anthony Perkins' best friend was Alfred Hitchcock.In any event, the 1960 movie, made with a television crew on the back lot at Universal on a budget that wouldn't keep a '90s movie in donuts, in some strange fashion made Perkins more than a star: It made him, forever, an icon.
NEWS
By JOSEPH GALLAGHER | December 31, 1992
Some choice items you might have missed in your 1992 readings:A newspaper story on the 50th anniversary of the destruction of Lidice, Czechoslovakia, recalled that ''assassins bombed the car Reinhard Heydrich, who was then buried with bombastic Nazi honors.''* April may be cool for a dip, but a local newspaper article on opening day at Oriole Park worried about ''Inner Harbor gridlock . . . the planners say their one real nightmare is a horde of divers circling the downtown area looking for parking.
NEWS
By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,chris.kaltenbach@baltsun.com | October 25, 2008
Movies featuring a bunch of profoundly disturbed people dominate today's TV schedule. What better way to celebrate the Saturday before Halloween? That most messed-up of mama's boys, Norman Bates, gets to show off his prowess with a knife in Alfred Hitchcock's masterpiece of horror, suspense and misdirection, Psycho (8 p.m., TCM). The 1960 film, made cheap and fast by the unit that worked with Hitchcock on his television show, packs more surprises than a truckload of Cracker Jacks. But often overlooked is the mastery of Anthony Perkins' performance as Norman.
FEATURES
November 4, 2005
THE QUESTION With gruesome special effects easier than ever (and on full display in Saw II), we wonder: Are today's movies scarier than classic chillers or less so? WHAT YOU SAY The films coming out today are far from scary. Perhaps if the people making these movies would pay attention to the movie behind the special effects, the box office would be doing better. CHRISTINA MAZZETTA, ABINGDON Scariness or fear is not created with "special effects," but rather evolved through imagination and anticipation on the big screen.
FEATURES
March 3, 2006
You know the "type." Bruce Willis, action guy (Die Hard, etc.). Milla Jovovich, seductive slayer of whatever (Resident Evil, etc.). Certain actors seem to thrive on being pigeonholed, with Willis' cop adventure 16 Blocks and Jovovich's futuristic keister kicker Ultraviolet opening today. Not exactly a stretch for either. We wonder, have you ever identified with an actor so strongly in a certain role that you were jarred when he or she tried to exhibit "range"? WHAT YOU SAY Cary Grant in Father Goose (1964)
NEWS
By JOSEPH GALLAGHER | December 31, 1992
Some choice items you might have missed in your 1992 readings:A newspaper story on the 50th anniversary of the destruction of Lidice, Czechoslovakia, recalled that ''assassins bombed the car Reinhard Heydrich, who was then buried with bombastic Nazi honors.''* April may be cool for a dip, but a local newspaper article on opening day at Oriole Park worried about ''Inner Harbor gridlock . . . the planners say their one real nightmare is a horde of divers circling the downtown area looking for parking.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | September 14, 1992
"A boy's best friend is his mother," Norman Bates says earnestly in Alfred Hitchcock's "Psycho," but Anthony Perkins, who played Norman and who died Saturday in California at 60, would not agree.Anthony Perkins' best friend was Norman Bates. Or maybe Anthony Perkins' best friend was Alfred Hitchcock.In any event, the 1960 movie, made with a television crew on the back lot at Universal on a budget that wouldn't keep a '90s movie in donuts, in some strange fashion made Perkins more than a star: It made him, forever, an icon.
NEWS
September 6, 1991
Thomas Anthony Perkins Sr., died of cancer Aug. 28 at the Greater Baltimore Medical Center. The former resident of Hampden and Arbutus was 78.A memorial service for Mr. Perkins will be held at 8:30 a.m. tomorrow at Woodlawn Cemetery, 2130 Woodlawn Drive.Mr. Perkins worked for nearly 30 years as a warehouseman for the Charles E. Hires Bottling Co. until the business left Baltimore in the late 1950s. He then worked for Western Auto Supply Co. until he retired in 1972 and moved to Holiday, Fla.Mr.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Television Critic | October 26, 1992
Norman Bates cast a long, long shadow over Anthony Perkins' acting career.And Norman is with Perkins and us tonight "In the Deep Woods," an NBC made-for-TV movie that includes Perkins' final performance before his death last month at age 60.Perkins isn't the star of the film. Rosanna Arquette ("Desperately Seeking Susan") is the lead, playing an illustrator of children's books who becomes involved in the hunt for a serial killer after her friend is murdered. In a dramatic sense, Arquette's performance is the best thing about this film that goes for one too many Hitchcockian twists and ultimately falls on its face.
FEATURES
By STEVE MCKERROW | November 10, 1990
Alfred Hitchcock's "Psycho" broods so deeply in the psyche of most American moviegoers it is doubtful any film could ever elicit the same measures of giddy fascination and revulsion, let alone another sequel to the 1960 classic. But boy, "Psycho IV" manages to get under your skin.Premiering tonight on cable's Showtime premium network, this edgy, erotic new production once again stars the dead-eyed Anthony Perkins as Norman Bates. It also benefits enormously from a spare script by Joseph Stefano, who wrote the original "Psycho" screenplay (from a novel by Robert Bloch)
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