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By Dave Rosenthal | March 27, 2013
I was saddened to read the obituaries for Anthony Lewis, the Pultizer Prize-winning reporter, columnist and author. He may be most familiar for his decades of work at the New York Times. But his book, "Gideon's Trumpet," was one of the first -- and best -- examples of literary journalism, which has flourished in the half-century that has followed its publication. In classic story-telling style, it explored a landmark Supreme Court case that granted legal representation to the poor, and was a forerunner of more current works such as Jon Krakauer's "Into Thin Air" or Rebecca Skloot's "The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks.
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SPORTS
By Edward Lee, The Baltimore Sun | November 16, 2013
Ken Niumatalolo, usually one of the more reserved coaches in college football, went off script in the Navy football team's 42-14 thrashing of South Alabama on Saturday night. Almost midway through the third quarter, the Midshipmen set up to punt on fourth-and-6 from their own 40-yard line. But junior punter Pablo Beltran faked the punt and instead threw to sophomore defensive end Will Anthony for a 15-yard gain and a first down. But officials flagged Navy for an ineligible player downfield.
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SPORTS
By Edward Lee, The Baltimore Sun | November 16, 2013
Ken Niumatalolo, usually one of the more reserved coaches in college football, went off script in the Navy football team's 42-14 thrashing of South Alabama on Saturday night. Almost midway through the third quarter, the Midshipmen set up to punt on fourth-and-6 from their own 40-yard line. But junior punter Pablo Beltran faked the punt and instead threw to sophomore defensive end Will Anthony for a 15-yard gain and a first down. But officials flagged Navy for an ineligible player downfield.
FEATURES
By Dave Rosenthal | March 27, 2013
I was saddened to read the obituaries for Anthony Lewis, the Pultizer Prize-winning reporter, columnist and author. He may be most familiar for his decades of work at the New York Times. But his book, "Gideon's Trumpet," was one of the first -- and best -- examples of literary journalism, which has flourished in the half-century that has followed its publication. In classic story-telling style, it explored a landmark Supreme Court case that granted legal representation to the poor, and was a forerunner of more current works such as Jon Krakauer's "Into Thin Air" or Rebecca Skloot's "The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks.
SPORTS
By KEN ROSENTHAL | May 6, 1993
At the place where Reggie Lewis spent much of his childhood, even the youngest understood."Heart problems," Tavon Biles said yesterday, without looking up from his game of checkers.Tavon Biles is 10. Like Reggie Lewis before him, he spends many afternoons at the Cecil-Kirk Recreation Center, a second home for 1,400 inner-city kids each week.Reggie would stop by after school when he was Tavon's age. He'd shoot pool, play cards, dabble in pingpong. Every kid who passes through Cecil-Kirk knows about Reggie.
SPORTS
By Milton Kent and Milton Kent,Staff Writer | July 29, 1993
For the longest time yesterday, Reggie Lewis' basketball court behind Collington Square Elementary School in East Baltimore sat empty.Lewis had the court resurfaced last year and added six new backboards and rims, making it a popular site for pickup games. But it remained silent through most of the day."I guess you could say they're in mourning," said Gregory Eggleston, a passer-by.Finally, around 5 p.m., a group of seven boys marched onto the court and unconsciously paid tribute to Lewis by doing precisely what he would have done -- play basketball.
SPORTS
By Ben Standig and Ben Standig,Contributing Writer | June 25, 1992
Herman Harried said he wanted to give something back, so he returned to the basketball courts where he learned the game. The former Dunbar forward is at Cecil-Kirk Recreation Center this week, running a basketball clinic for boys and girls ages 8-13."
NEWS
By C. Fraser Smith | May 11, 2003
UNLESS WE actively defend the rule of law, terrorists will have succeeded on 9/11. It's not a new warning, but one that needs repeating in what the writer Anthony Lewis calls "a war without end." Since we may not find Osama bin Laden and since we know his disciples will want revenge, we may never be able to say the war is over. In the meantime, Mr. Lewis asks, "How will we protect civil liberties?" It's important for the rest of us to think deeply about his question because others have offered their own, quite disturbing answers.
NEWS
By Mona Charen | August 12, 1992
THE sudden display of muscular interventionism by leading liberals and Democrats is intriguing. They are rattling swords at the Serbs, while loudly announcing to the president of the United States that to do nothing in the face of possible Serbian war crimes would amount to a moral outrage.First things first. The Serbs are committing naked aggression. In keeping with the sorry practice of 20th-century war-making, they are purposely targeting civilians, including children and the sick and elderly.
NEWS
By Steven Stark | October 14, 1991
MAKE NO LAW: The Sullivan Case and the First Amendment.By Anthony Lewis.Random House.354 pages. $25. AS OUR foremost teller of non-fiction legal tales, Anthony Lewis is the poet laureate of the legal process. In his hands, the complicated workings of our legal system -- its baffling procedures, customs and history -- are explained with such sympathy and narrative ability that they assume a significance befitting what may be, after all, the most successful experiment in law and government ever established.
NEWS
By C. Fraser Smith | May 11, 2003
UNLESS WE actively defend the rule of law, terrorists will have succeeded on 9/11. It's not a new warning, but one that needs repeating in what the writer Anthony Lewis calls "a war without end." Since we may not find Osama bin Laden and since we know his disciples will want revenge, we may never be able to say the war is over. In the meantime, Mr. Lewis asks, "How will we protect civil liberties?" It's important for the rest of us to think deeply about his question because others have offered their own, quite disturbing answers.
FEATURES
By Alexa James and Alexa James,SUN STAFF | August 3, 2002
Let's talk numbers. Baltimore Ravens All-Pro linebacker Ray Lewis (No. 52, age 27) just signed a seven-year contract worth $50 million. Should he continue making his average of 181 tackles per season, that means Lewis will be making the equivalent of $39,463.30 every time he knocks the wind out of someone. If he never plays another down, Lewis still pockets $19 million for agreeing to the deal. But that's just basic arithmetic. What do the numbers involved in Lewis' NFL contract really mean?
NEWS
By Todd Richissin and Kurt Streeter and Todd Richissin and Kurt Streeter,SUN STAFF | February 6, 2000
LAKELAND, Fla. -- On a hot summer day in 1990, coach Ernest Joe strode across the practice field at Kathleen High School here and spotted a flash that nearly took his breath away: A sinewy young man darting between blockers like a hungry lion. It was Ray Lewis. "All I remember from that moment was how he moved," Joe says. "Ray could run better and run faster than anybody I had ever seen. Nothing could stop him." From the perspective of residents of this small central Florida town, from accounts at the University of Miami, where Lewis lived up to his promise to play like no other middle linebacker its team had ever seen, and according to those who know him from Baltimore, where he became as popular with Ravens fans as he became feared by opponents, nothing had been able to stop Ray Anthony Lewis, ever.
SPORTS
By Milton Kent and Milton Kent,Staff Writer | July 29, 1993
For the longest time yesterday, Reggie Lewis' basketball court behind Collington Square Elementary School in East Baltimore sat empty.Lewis had the court resurfaced last year and added six new backboards and rims, making it a popular site for pickup games. But it remained silent through most of the day."I guess you could say they're in mourning," said Gregory Eggleston, a passer-by.Finally, around 5 p.m., a group of seven boys marched onto the court and unconsciously paid tribute to Lewis by doing precisely what he would have done -- play basketball.
SPORTS
By KEN ROSENTHAL | May 6, 1993
At the place where Reggie Lewis spent much of his childhood, even the youngest understood."Heart problems," Tavon Biles said yesterday, without looking up from his game of checkers.Tavon Biles is 10. Like Reggie Lewis before him, he spends many afternoons at the Cecil-Kirk Recreation Center, a second home for 1,400 inner-city kids each week.Reggie would stop by after school when he was Tavon's age. He'd shoot pool, play cards, dabble in pingpong. Every kid who passes through Cecil-Kirk knows about Reggie.
NEWS
By Mona Charen | August 12, 1992
THE sudden display of muscular interventionism by leading liberals and Democrats is intriguing. They are rattling swords at the Serbs, while loudly announcing to the president of the United States that to do nothing in the face of possible Serbian war crimes would amount to a moral outrage.First things first. The Serbs are committing naked aggression. In keeping with the sorry practice of 20th-century war-making, they are purposely targeting civilians, including children and the sick and elderly.
FEATURES
By Alexa James and Alexa James,SUN STAFF | August 3, 2002
Let's talk numbers. Baltimore Ravens All-Pro linebacker Ray Lewis (No. 52, age 27) just signed a seven-year contract worth $50 million. Should he continue making his average of 181 tackles per season, that means Lewis will be making the equivalent of $39,463.30 every time he knocks the wind out of someone. If he never plays another down, Lewis still pockets $19 million for agreeing to the deal. But that's just basic arithmetic. What do the numbers involved in Lewis' NFL contract really mean?
NEWS
By Todd Richissin and Kurt Streeter and Todd Richissin and Kurt Streeter,SUN STAFF | February 6, 2000
LAKELAND, Fla. -- On a hot summer day in 1990, coach Ernest Joe strode across the practice field at Kathleen High School here and spotted a flash that nearly took his breath away: A sinewy young man darting between blockers like a hungry lion. It was Ray Lewis. "All I remember from that moment was how he moved," Joe says. "Ray could run better and run faster than anybody I had ever seen. Nothing could stop him." From the perspective of residents of this small central Florida town, from accounts at the University of Miami, where Lewis lived up to his promise to play like no other middle linebacker its team had ever seen, and according to those who know him from Baltimore, where he became as popular with Ravens fans as he became feared by opponents, nothing had been able to stop Ray Anthony Lewis, ever.
SPORTS
By Ben Standig and Ben Standig,Contributing Writer | June 25, 1992
Herman Harried said he wanted to give something back, so he returned to the basketball courts where he learned the game. The former Dunbar forward is at Cecil-Kirk Recreation Center this week, running a basketball clinic for boys and girls ages 8-13."
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