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Anthony Lake

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NEWS
March 21, 1997
TROUBLED BY subversion from within, attacks from without, a flawed history on human rights and musical-chairs leadership, the CIA is badly in need of stability and clarity of mission. This task now is slated for George J. Tenet, President Clinton's fifth nominee in four years as Director of Central Intelligence. If he gets the Senate confirmation denied star-crossed Anthony Lake, the nation will have a high stake in his success.During Senate hearings in 1995 on his nomination as the CIA's deputy director, Mr. Tenet set four priorities: developing "actionable intelligence" unobtainable elsewhere; "re-engineering" the 80,000-member intelligence community spread over a dozen agencies; revitalizing a Directorate of Operations shaken by spy scandals, and building up counter-intelligence.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 21, 1997
TROUBLED BY subversion from within, attacks from without, a flawed history on human rights and musical-chairs leadership, the CIA is badly in need of stability and clarity of mission. This task now is slated for George J. Tenet, President Clinton's fifth nominee in four years as Director of Central Intelligence. If he gets the Senate confirmation denied star-crossed Anthony Lake, the nation will have a high stake in his success.During Senate hearings in 1995 on his nomination as the CIA's deputy director, Mr. Tenet set four priorities: developing "actionable intelligence" unobtainable elsewhere; "re-engineering" the 80,000-member intelligence community spread over a dozen agencies; revitalizing a Directorate of Operations shaken by spy scandals, and building up counter-intelligence.
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NEWS
November 3, 1993
One year ago today, Bill Clinton was elected president with a plurality of only 43 percent of the votes. After nine and a half months in office, his approval rating is only 1 percent higher, according to a poll by the Times Mirror Center for the People and the Press. Both the influential elite and the general public display an uncertainty about the American role in the world -- one could call it incipient isolationism -- that surely reflects the indecisive leadership of this administration.
NEWS
March 19, 1997
ALTHOUGH ANTHONY LAKE was always a questionable choice as Director of Central Intelligence, he did not deserve the partisan pummeling he got from the Republican-led Senate Intelligence Committee. Nor did his National Security Council deserve the high-handed exploitation it got from frenzied fund-raisers at the Democratic National Committee.Mr. Lake is right that "Washington has gone haywire." But Washington is constantly haywire; it's just a matter of degree. There is poignancy in Mr. Lake's wish that the country at large "will demand that Washington give priority to policy over partisanship, to governing over 'gotcha.
NEWS
By James P. Pinkerton | January 15, 1997
"AND HE SHALL nominate, and by and with the Advice and Consent of the Senate, shall appoint Ambassadors, other public Ministers and Consuls . . . '' That's all the Constitution tells us about the role of the president and the Senate in filling top federal jobs.For many Americans, the most informative treatment of the subject remains Allen Drury's 1959 novel, ''Advise and Consent.'' Drury took a naive country on a behind-the-scenes tour of Washington glamour, intrigue -- and treason.The story starts with the president's nomination of one Robert Leffingwell as secretary of state.
NEWS
March 19, 1997
ALTHOUGH ANTHONY LAKE was always a questionable choice as Director of Central Intelligence, he did not deserve the partisan pummeling he got from the Republican-led Senate Intelligence Committee. Nor did his National Security Council deserve the high-handed exploitation it got from frenzied fund-raisers at the Democratic National Committee.Mr. Lake is right that "Washington has gone haywire." But Washington is constantly haywire; it's just a matter of degree. There is poignancy in Mr. Lake's wish that the country at large "will demand that Washington give priority to policy over partisanship, to governing over 'gotcha.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | May 20, 1995
WASHINGTON -- Senior Clinton administration officials have recommended that the United States establish full diplomatic ties with Vietnam, administration officials said yesterday.But Sen. Bob Dole of Kansas, the majority leader, and other Republicans have introduced a bill to derail the proposal.The question of normalizing relations flared anew after Vietnamese officials Tuesday turned over more than 200 pages of documents about Americans missing in action.Senior officials said there is increasing pressure in the administration, especially within the State Department, to recognize Vietnam.
NEWS
By Jeane Kirkpatrick | January 29, 1996
WASHINGTON -- An extremely interesting analysis of President Clinton's foreign policy is offered in the current issue of Foreign Affairs, by ''Friend Of Bill'' Michael Mandelbaum. From the downsizing of the military to the deploying of U.S. troops on three continents. Mr. Mandelbaum finds the president's approach almost as strange as I do.He sees ''three failed military interventions'' -- in Somalia, Haiti and Bosnia -- as ''defining events'' of the Clinton administration -- events that express a ''distinctive view'' of America's role in the post-Cold War world.
NEWS
By Daniel Berger | September 30, 1995
JUST BY CLOSING no options, Gen. Colin Powell has restored the center to American politics.More than that, he has revived the moderate, internationalist wing of the Republican Party, which had given itself up for dead.General Powell is not a quixotic figure. His mystique is for caution, preparation and overwhelming odds. He despises adventures, abhors risk.Extrapolated from the military to the political theater of operations, that would lead one to believe he contemplates no independent run for the presidency.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,Washington Bureau | June 24, 1993
WASHINGTON -- The U.S. government watched in helpless anger yesterday as Nigeria's military government scrapped the transition to democratic rule of Africa's most populous country, dealing a major setback to political progress throughout the continent.While the Clinton administration threatened to cut aid and chill relations, a senior official said there was little the United States could do to force dictator Ibrahim Babangida to accept the results of recent elections and yield power."We don't have many levers there," the official said, noting that Nigeria, a major oil exporter, is wealthy by African standards.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | March 12, 1997
WASHINGTON -- President Clinton's nominee to be director of central intelligence found himself in the awkward position yesterday of explaining why he was kept in the dark by his own staff about alleged Chinese efforts to influence last year's U.S. elections.The nominee, Anthony Lake, was Clinton's national security adviser in June, when the FBI briefed two of Lake's subordinates who specialize in intelligence on reports of Chinese plans to donate to U.S. election campaigns.Yet even though Lake would begin and end each work day with intelligence reports and expected his staff members to tell him about matters of the "greatest importance," Lake said he had not been informed.
NEWS
By James P. Pinkerton | January 15, 1997
"AND HE SHALL nominate, and by and with the Advice and Consent of the Senate, shall appoint Ambassadors, other public Ministers and Consuls . . . '' That's all the Constitution tells us about the role of the president and the Senate in filling top federal jobs.For many Americans, the most informative treatment of the subject remains Allen Drury's 1959 novel, ''Advise and Consent.'' Drury took a naive country on a behind-the-scenes tour of Washington glamour, intrigue -- and treason.The story starts with the president's nomination of one Robert Leffingwell as secretary of state.
NEWS
By Jeane Kirkpatrick | January 29, 1996
WASHINGTON -- An extremely interesting analysis of President Clinton's foreign policy is offered in the current issue of Foreign Affairs, by ''Friend Of Bill'' Michael Mandelbaum. From the downsizing of the military to the deploying of U.S. troops on three continents. Mr. Mandelbaum finds the president's approach almost as strange as I do.He sees ''three failed military interventions'' -- in Somalia, Haiti and Bosnia -- as ''defining events'' of the Clinton administration -- events that express a ''distinctive view'' of America's role in the post-Cold War world.
NEWS
By Daniel Berger | September 30, 1995
JUST BY CLOSING no options, Gen. Colin Powell has restored the center to American politics.More than that, he has revived the moderate, internationalist wing of the Republican Party, which had given itself up for dead.General Powell is not a quixotic figure. His mystique is for caution, preparation and overwhelming odds. He despises adventures, abhors risk.Extrapolated from the military to the political theater of operations, that would lead one to believe he contemplates no independent run for the presidency.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | May 20, 1995
WASHINGTON -- Senior Clinton administration officials have recommended that the United States establish full diplomatic ties with Vietnam, administration officials said yesterday.But Sen. Bob Dole of Kansas, the majority leader, and other Republicans have introduced a bill to derail the proposal.The question of normalizing relations flared anew after Vietnamese officials Tuesday turned over more than 200 pages of documents about Americans missing in action.Senior officials said there is increasing pressure in the administration, especially within the State Department, to recognize Vietnam.
NEWS
November 3, 1993
One year ago today, Bill Clinton was elected president with a plurality of only 43 percent of the votes. After nine and a half months in office, his approval rating is only 1 percent higher, according to a poll by the Times Mirror Center for the People and the Press. Both the influential elite and the general public display an uncertainty about the American role in the world -- one could call it incipient isolationism -- that surely reflects the indecisive leadership of this administration.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | March 12, 1997
WASHINGTON -- President Clinton's nominee to be director of central intelligence found himself in the awkward position yesterday of explaining why he was kept in the dark by his own staff about alleged Chinese efforts to influence last year's U.S. elections.The nominee, Anthony Lake, was Clinton's national security adviser in June, when the FBI briefed two of Lake's subordinates who specialize in intelligence on reports of Chinese plans to donate to U.S. election campaigns.Yet even though Lake would begin and end each work day with intelligence reports and expected his staff members to tell him about matters of the "greatest importance," Lake said he had not been informed.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | June 29, 1994
WASHINGTON -- Secretary of State Warren M. Christopher said in a statement last night that he "enthusiastically" welcomed it. National Security Adviser Anthony Lake insisted in an interview yesterday that he supported it from the moment the president told him about it.But in the corridors of the State Department, and even parts of the White House, there is anxiety about the appointment of David R. Gergen as a "special adviser" to both Mr. Christopher and...
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,Washington Bureau | June 24, 1993
WASHINGTON -- The U.S. government watched in helpless anger yesterday as Nigeria's military government scrapped the transition to democratic rule of Africa's most populous country, dealing a major setback to political progress throughout the continent.While the Clinton administration threatened to cut aid and chill relations, a senior official said there was little the United States could do to force dictator Ibrahim Babangida to accept the results of recent elections and yield power."We don't have many levers there," the official said, noting that Nigeria, a major oil exporter, is wealthy by African standards.
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