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By MICHAEL SRAGOW and MICHAEL SRAGOW,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | February 3, 2006
Roger Donaldson's The World's Fastest Indian, based on the real life of Kiwi biker Burt Munro (Anthony Hopkins), puts a burst of warmth into that by-now too-familiar genre, the inspirational biopic. Both handmade and souped-up, it beautifully renders two types of camaraderie: the bonds among eccentrics and the fellowship of speed. Laboring alone in Invercargill, New Zealand, Munro lets the tumult of the Sixties slip right by him as he customizes his 1920 Indian Scout motorcycle. He aims to test its limits at the Bonneville Salt Flats in Utah.
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By Matt Vensel | November 25, 2011
The Ravens tied a franchise high with nine sacks in the Thanksgiving night win over the San Francisco 49ers. Terrell Suggs had three of them, inspiring Sizzle to tell CSN Baltimore, "I eat these QBs, Anthony Hopkins. "
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By Seattle Times | June 26, 1992
Anthony Hopkins is taking a few days off. That's almost an aberration in the career of the Academy Award-winning actor, who has been phenomenally busy in films, stage and television for a quarter century.During the past year, he's enjoyed his greatest commercial success ("The Silence of the Lambs," for which he won an Oscar) and one of the artistic peaks of his career ("Howards End"). He's also worked with Mick Jagger (in "Freejack") and filmmakers John Schlesinger ("The Innocent") and Francis Ford Coppola (Mr. Hopkins plays Van Helsing to Gary Oldman's vampire count in a new version of "Dracula")
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | November 16, 2007
Owing more to the sword-and-sex-play fantasies of 12-year-olds than the traditions of Old English poetry, Robert Zemeckis' Beowulf will allow adolescents to have their cheesecake - and beefcake - and eat it, too. Old Hollywood's moviemakers used to set their toga sagas in Rome when Christianity was poised to usurp paganism, so they could exploit nude milk baths and gladiatorial combat while bewailing godless excess. Beowulf (Paramount Pictures) Starring Ray Winstone, Anthony Hopkins, Robin Wright Penn, Angelina Jolie.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | March 31, 1992
An article on the Academy Awards in yesterday's Today section incorrectly attributed a quote from an Oscar acceptance speech to Alan Menken, Howard Ashman's collaborator. In fact, the quote was from William Lauch, the longtime companion of the late Mr. Ashman.The Sun regrets the error."The Silence of the Lambs" and its beauty and its beast dominated last night's 64th Annual Academy Awards, winning five Oscars, including Best Picture, Best Actress, Best Actor and Best Director."Silence's" Jonathan Demme won Best Director for the job he did in shepherding to the screen Thomas Harris's spooky novel of a young FBI agent's hunt for a brutal psychotic killer, as guided by still another, and more frightening, psychotic killer.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Film Critic | February 11, 2001
NEW YORK -- He's won an Oscar. He's been nominated four times. He's played everyone from presidents and Nobel laureates to butlers and crazed ventriloquists. He's even been knighted. It would be hard to think of an actor more accomplished than Anthony Hopkins, who returned to movie screens last week in his role as that most erudite of cannibals, Hannibal Lecter. Yet it would also be hard to find someone less inclined to pontificate on the fine art of acting. "I've become so detached over the years," the 63-year-old actor says during a roundtable discussion at New York's Regency hotel.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | April 20, 2007
A few truths to be gleaned from Fracture, the new cat-and-mouse thriller starring Anthony Hopkins as a really smart guy who kills his wife and Ryan Gosling as the assistant D.A. charged with bringing him to justice: 1. Hopkins could spend the rest of his career channeling Hannibal Lecter, playing riffs on the criminal who's so much smarter than everyone else, though we hope he won't coast like that. Still, he is so good at the type. Fracture (New Line Cinema) Starring Anthony Hopkins, Ryan Gosling.
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By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | November 13, 1998
To call the three-hour-long "Meet Joe Black" leaden would do an injustice to lead. To call it phlegmatic is to dishonor phlegm. To describe it as turgid does a disservice to honest turges everywhere.Only the hardest-core Brad Pitt fans will want to brave this static, deflated entry into the Screen Angels Sweepstakes. If they insist on disregarding the best advice -- Don't go! -- then they should at least heed the following: Bring adequate lumbar support and gallons of coffee, not to mention a box of Kleenex.
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By Sandra Crockett and Sandra Crockett,SUN STAFF | June 1, 1999
The door swings open. Actor Cuba Gooding Jr. is on the other side. The door slams shut. Actor Cuba Gooding Jr. is still on the other side.Laughing, he finally makes it into the room. This wasn't a lame attempt at a Hollywood style "entrance," he says. "The door closed on me," he explains reaching out a hand in greeting.Well, not too many doors are closing on this guy these days.You know Gooding. He played the swaggering, loudmouth, professional football player who shouted the now-immortal phrase "Show me the money!"
SPORTS
August 3, 1995
Brady Anderson, OriolesHis five favorite recent movies:1. "The Shawshank Redemption" "Hope and will prevail in the most depressing of circumstances. The main character's hope gives him strength that he would regain his place in society."2. "Rain Man" "You see the so-called normal person learning a great deal about life from the institutionalized person and evolving as a person because of it."3. "Dead Poets Society" "The movie inspires a sense of making the most out of life, but also the tragedies that occur when parents put un-needed pressure on their kids."
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By The Denver Post | April 20, 2007
Check the most recent entries on actor Ryan Gosling's career dance card: Young heartthrob in a treacly romance that critics loathed and the public loved. Cokehead teacher in one of the cheapest and most depressing indie films of 2006. Cocky district attorney opposite murderous Anthony Hopkins in a police-procedural genre movie opening today. "If anything, I've been painted with this `independent, brooding actor' brush," said Gosling, who was nominated for a best-actor Oscar in January for playing that addicted instructor in Half Nelson.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | April 20, 2007
A few truths to be gleaned from Fracture, the new cat-and-mouse thriller starring Anthony Hopkins as a really smart guy who kills his wife and Ryan Gosling as the assistant D.A. charged with bringing him to justice: 1. Hopkins could spend the rest of his career channeling Hannibal Lecter, playing riffs on the criminal who's so much smarter than everyone else, though we hope he won't coast like that. Still, he is so good at the type. Fracture (New Line Cinema) Starring Anthony Hopkins, Ryan Gosling.
FEATURES
By MICHAEL SRAGOW and MICHAEL SRAGOW,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | February 3, 2006
Roger Donaldson's The World's Fastest Indian, based on the real life of Kiwi biker Burt Munro (Anthony Hopkins), puts a burst of warmth into that by-now too-familiar genre, the inspirational biopic. Both handmade and souped-up, it beautifully renders two types of camaraderie: the bonds among eccentrics and the fellowship of speed. Laboring alone in Invercargill, New Zealand, Munro lets the tumult of the Sixties slip right by him as he customizes his 1920 Indian Scout motorcycle. He aims to test its limits at the Bonneville Salt Flats in Utah.
FEATURES
By MICHAEL SRAGOW and MICHAEL SRAGOW,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | September 30, 2005
If you come to the movie Proof as I did, not having read or seen David Auburn's Pulitzer Prize-winning play, you may enjoy the first half as a melancholy romance streaked with humor. After all, it seems to be about a female math whiz (Gwyneth Paltrow) emerging from grief over the death of her addled math-genius dad (Anthony Hopkins) with the help of one of his former grad students (Jake Gyllenhaal). Director John Madden and the screenwriters, Auburn and Rebecca Miller, sketch in the Chicago academic-math milieu with light poetic strokes, like Gyllenhaal's belonging to a band that "plays" a three-minute silent number called "i" - for "imaginary number."
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | January 14, 2005
Forget about those lips, those eyes: What tears you up about Hilary Swank from the start of Million Dollar Baby are those gums, those teeth. As an L.A. waitress from the Ozarks who strives to be a champion boxer, she opens up her face with the jaw-wide smiles and grimaces of a woman who wouldn't think of molding an emotional expression for effect. With homegrown American material, Swank has proved herself a killer actor. She was devastating as the gender-confused "Brandon Teena" in her Oscar-winning performance in Boys Don't Cry, and she brings a similarly remarkable blend of toughness and neediness to her fledgling fighter in Million Dollar Baby.
NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | September 2, 2004
Some longtime friends long absent from the screen are returning this fall, which should make for some happy reunions in the nation's movie theaters. Among those actors who'll be offering their work up for public inspection after especially long absences are Jodie Foster, off screen since 2002's Panic Room; Annette Bening, off screen since 2000's What Planet Are You From? and even Barbra Streisand, AWOL since 1996's The Mirror Has Two Faces. Babs get the award for returning in the unlikeliest place; she'll be playing Ben Stiller's mother in Meet the Fockers (Dec.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | November 16, 2007
Owing more to the sword-and-sex-play fantasies of 12-year-olds than the traditions of Old English poetry, Robert Zemeckis' Beowulf will allow adolescents to have their cheesecake - and beefcake - and eat it, too. Old Hollywood's moviemakers used to set their toga sagas in Rome when Christianity was poised to usurp paganism, so they could exploit nude milk baths and gladiatorial combat while bewailing godless excess. Beowulf (Paramount Pictures) Starring Ray Winstone, Anthony Hopkins, Robin Wright Penn, Angelina Jolie.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | June 7, 2002
In the trailers to Bad Company, it's difficult to tell whether the moviemakers intend a thriller or a spoof. In the movie, there's no such confusion: They simply jam the two together and keep the action hurtling so that audiences who surrender their brains can go along for the ride. Bad Company is about an undercover brother, but it will never be confused with Undercover Brother. True, before the CIA enlists him as the point man on a mission near-impossible, Chris Rock's character is just a Jersey City street guy, Jake Hayes, who makes his living scalping sports tickets, playing speed chess and doing DJ gigs at local clubs.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Film Critic | February 11, 2001
NEW YORK -- He's won an Oscar. He's been nominated four times. He's played everyone from presidents and Nobel laureates to butlers and crazed ventriloquists. He's even been knighted. It would be hard to think of an actor more accomplished than Anthony Hopkins, who returned to movie screens last week in his role as that most erudite of cannibals, Hannibal Lecter. Yet it would also be hard to find someone less inclined to pontificate on the fine art of acting. "I've become so detached over the years," the 63-year-old actor says during a roundtable discussion at New York's Regency hotel.
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