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Anthony Graber

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By Peter Hermann, The Baltimore Sun | September 27, 2010
In a decision that could make it easier for citizens to record police officers in Maryland, a Harford County judge ruled Monday that state police and prosecutors were wrong to arrest and charge a man for taping his own traffic stop and posting it on the Internet. Circuit Court Judge Emory A. Plitt Jr.'s ruling helps clarify the state's wire tap law and makes it clear that police officers enjoy little expectation of privacy as they perform their duties. "Those of us who are public officials and are entrusted with the power of the state are ultimately accountable to the public," Plitt wrote.
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NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | May 17, 2012
The U.S. Department of Justice isn't satisfied with the Baltimore Police Department's recently issued orders on the public's right to record officers. Jonathan Smith, chief of the special litigation section of the Justice Department's Civil Rights Division, filed an 11-page letter with the court this week in the case of Christopher Sharp, a Howard County man suing police for allegedly deleting videos from his cellphone after he recorded an officer arresting a woman at the 2010 Preakness.
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NEWS
September 29, 2010
As sworn officers of the law, police have every right to expect respectful compliance with their orders in the discharge of their official duties. What they have no right to expect is that their interactions with the public in that capacity should remain hidden from public view in public places. That principle was reaffirmed Monday when Harford County Circuit Court Judge Emory A. Plitt Jr. ruled that police and prosecutors were wrong to charge a man for taping his own traffic stop and posting it on the Internet.
NEWS
September 29, 2010
As sworn officers of the law, police have every right to expect respectful compliance with their orders in the discharge of their official duties. What they have no right to expect is that their interactions with the public in that capacity should remain hidden from public view in public places. That principle was reaffirmed Monday when Harford County Circuit Court Judge Emory A. Plitt Jr. ruled that police and prosecutors were wrong to charge a man for taping his own traffic stop and posting it on the Internet.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | May 17, 2012
The U.S. Department of Justice isn't satisfied with the Baltimore Police Department's recently issued orders on the public's right to record officers. Jonathan Smith, chief of the special litigation section of the Justice Department's Civil Rights Division, filed an 11-page letter with the court this week in the case of Christopher Sharp, a Howard County man suing police for allegedly deleting videos from his cellphone after he recorded an officer arresting a woman at the 2010 Preakness.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann, The Baltimore Sun | September 3, 2010
Citing a 2,000-year-old Roman quote, "Who will watch the watchers?" a Harford County judge skeptically questioned prosecutors Friday pressing criminal charges against a motorcyclist for recording his traffic stop and posting the video on the Internet. Circuit Judge Emory A. Plitt Jr. said he would issue a written ruling shortly as to whether the case against Anthony Graber can proceed to trial Oct. 12, but he acknowledged that appeals courts have not ruled on the issue and that "we are on unplowed ground.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | July 30, 2010
Marylanders appear to have the right to record interactions with police officers with devices such as video cameras and mobile phones, according to an opinion by the state attorney general's office. The advisory letter was issued as several people face or have been threatened with criminal charges for taping police. It's unlikely that most interactions with police could be considered private, as some law enforcement agencies have interpreted the state's wiretapping act, wrote Assistant Attorney General Robert McDonald.
NEWS
May 7, 2004
On May 6, 2004, MARLENE (nee Smith), beloved wife of the late Anthony J. Graber Sr., devoted mother of Douglas J., Leslie J. and Anthony J. Graber Jr. Also surviving are four grandchildren, two brothers, five sisters, other relatives and friends. Funeral Service will be held at the family owned Duda-Ruck Funeral Home of Dundalk, Inc., 7922 Wise Ave., on Saturday at 10:30 A.M. Interment Oaklawn Cemetery.
NEWS
May 11, 2010
I don't condone all of the actions of Anthony John Graber III, the Harford County motorcyclist now facing charges for videotaping a police officer who stopped him for traffic violations, nor do I know him. But what's the difference between a camera in a police car and the person being pulled over recording a traffic stop? Let's imagine that the trooper struck Mr. Graber with his weapon. Would Mr. Graber be facing wiretap charges? I don't think so. I don't think that we can assume that Mr. Graber was trying to entrap a police officer.
NEWS
June 1, 2010
Anthony Graber is facing felony charges today. His crime? Recording a traffic stop with a video camera — supposedly prohibited in Maryland under an archaic "anti-wiretapping" statute that is well past due for a revisit by the General Assembly. Mr. Graber was riding his motorcycle on I-95 in Maryland, speeding and popping wheelies and recording the experience with a helmet cam. An unmarked car cut him off as he slowed for traffic, and a man in a sweatshirt and jeans jumped out with a gun in his hand.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann, The Baltimore Sun | September 27, 2010
In a decision that could make it easier for citizens to record police officers in Maryland, a Harford County judge ruled Monday that state police and prosecutors were wrong to arrest and charge a man for taping his own traffic stop and posting it on the Internet. Circuit Court Judge Emory A. Plitt Jr.'s ruling helps clarify the state's wire tap law and makes it clear that police officers enjoy little expectation of privacy as they perform their duties. "Those of us who are public officials and are entrusted with the power of the state are ultimately accountable to the public," Plitt wrote.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann, The Baltimore Sun | September 3, 2010
Citing a 2,000-year-old Roman quote, "Who will watch the watchers?" a Harford County judge skeptically questioned prosecutors Friday pressing criminal charges against a motorcyclist for recording his traffic stop and posting the video on the Internet. Circuit Judge Emory A. Plitt Jr. said he would issue a written ruling shortly as to whether the case against Anthony Graber can proceed to trial Oct. 12, but he acknowledged that appeals courts have not ruled on the issue and that "we are on unplowed ground.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | July 30, 2010
Marylanders appear to have the right to record interactions with police officers with devices such as video cameras and mobile phones, according to an opinion by the state attorney general's office. The advisory letter was issued as several people face or have been threatened with criminal charges for taping police. It's unlikely that most interactions with police could be considered private, as some law enforcement agencies have interpreted the state's wiretapping act, wrote Assistant Attorney General Robert McDonald.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | January 11, 2012
The U.S. Department of Justice's Civil Rights Division has urged a federal court to side with a Howard County man in a lawsuit over his cellphone being seized by Baltimore police at the Preakness Stakes after he filmed officers making an arrest. The federal attorneys say the lawsuit "presents constitutional questions of great moment in this digital age. " They asked U.S. District Judge Benson Everett Legg to rule that citizens have a right to record police officers and that officers who seize and destroy recordings without a warrant or due process are violating the Fourth and 14th amendments.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann, The Baltimore Sun | May 8, 2010
Cops don't seem to like getting caught on camera. Anthony John Graber III of Harford County is finding that out the hard way. His rapid and possibly reckless motorcycle trip up Interstate 95 has landed the systems engineer in more trouble than a speeding ticket. The 24-year-old Graber is facing criminal charges after the Internet posting of a video he recorded on his helmet-mounted camera during a March 5 traffic stop. When a state trooper saw the 23-second clip on YouTube 10 days after the stop, police got a warrant, searched Graber's parents' house in Abingdon, seized his equipment and charged him with violating the state's unusually restrictive wiretapping law. It's illegal in Maryland to capture audio without the other person's consent, and Trooper J.D. Uhler said he didn't know he was being recorded.
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