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By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | November 8, 2012
Baltimore police have turned over to prosecutors their investigation into the death of Anthony Anderson, who the state medical examiner says died in September from blunt force traumaduring an arrest in East Baltimore.  Police spokesman Anthony Guglielmi said the case is now under prosecutorial review, and prosecutors did not give a timetable for a decision. Anderson, 46, was walking through a vacant lot when he was stopped by police officers  Detective Gregg Boyd, Detective Michael Vodarick and Detective Todd Strohman.  Relatives and others who say they witnessed the encounter say Anderson was unnecessarily thrown to the ground and that officers ignored his rapidly deteriorating condition, and have called for criminal charges.
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SPORTS
By Alexander Pyles and The Baltimore Sun | August 24, 2014
Aquille Carr will soon be on his way to Canada. The one-time Patterson star, who became a YouTube sensation for his feats on the basketball court, agreed to terms Friday night on a contract with the National Basketball League of Canada's Saint John Mill Rats. Carr plans to travel to Saint John this week. The team has organized a meet-and-greet with fans on Wednesday. A Mill Rats news release said Carr was "projected to team with the league's reigning MVP, guard Anthony Anderson (aka Double A)
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NEWS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | January 28, 2013
Baltimore State's Attorney Gregg L. Bernstein on Monday reached out to the black community by answering call-in questions on WOLB's Larry Young Morning Show about his controversial decision to not prosecute the three Baltimore police officers involved in the death of East Baltimore resident Anthony Anderson. On Thursday, Bernstein said his office had determined that Detective Todd A. Strohman used appropriate action when he tackled Anderson during a September drug arrest that resulted in broken ribs and a lacerated spleen, which killed the 46-year-old man. Officers said Anderson was attempting to swallow drugs while walking away from them, which caused Strohman to use a “bear hug” to take him to the ground and preserve evidence.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton and Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | December 11, 2013
Baltimore prosecutors on Tuesday said a heart condition and dehydration were factors in the death of a man being restrained by police during a July traffic stop. But the state medical examiner could not determine the degree to which the officers' actions - or Tyrone West's ailments - contributed to his death. The examiner couldn't conclude whether the death resulted from a homicide, accident or other means. The release of the findings came a day before a City Council hearing called to probe delays in the case.
NEWS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | January 25, 2013
Prosecutors will not charge the Baltimore police officers involved in arresting and fatally injuring a man — after finding that they did not use excessive force and followed police procedure when a detective tackled Anthony Anderson in a vacant lot last September. Baltimore State's Attorney Gregg L. Bernstein made the announcement Thursday, in a case that has roiled Anderson's East Baltimore community and sparked accusations of police brutality against black men. "I said to the family this morning, there's no question Mr. Anderson's death is a tragedy," Bernstein said.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | September 26, 2012
In a filthy East Baltimore lot used as a shortcut and as a place to buy heroin, community leaders and relatives of a man who died in police custody railed against the police Tuesday and called for justice in the case. Anthony Anderson, 46, died in this lot Friday night during a routine drug arrest. Police say the circumstances remain under investigation, but people who say they witnessed his death — including his family members — believe he died from injuries sustained while being arrested.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | December 17, 2012
Activists gathered in front of a downtown Baltimore courthouse Monday, calling for State's Attorney Gregg L. Bernstein to bring charges against officers being investigated in the death of an East Baltimore man during an arrest. It has been more than a month since prosecutors were handed the police investigation into the death of 46-year-old Anthony Anderson, who was thrown to the ground during a drug arrest on Sept. 21. Police initially said it was believed Anderson died after ingesting or choking on drugs, but an autopsy ruled that the death was a homicide caused by blunt force trauma.
SPORTS
By Alexander Pyles and The Baltimore Sun | August 24, 2014
Aquille Carr will soon be on his way to Canada. The one-time Patterson star, who became a YouTube sensation for his feats on the basketball court, agreed to terms Friday night on a contract with the National Basketball League of Canada's Saint John Mill Rats. Carr plans to travel to Saint John this week. The team has organized a meet-and-greet with fans on Wednesday. A Mill Rats news release said Carr was "projected to team with the league's reigning MVP, guard Anthony Anderson (aka Double A)
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun and By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | August 12, 2013
Three weeks after Tyrone West died in police custody after a Baltimore traffic stop, the state medical examiner's office said it is still investigating his cause of death amid growing calls for answers in the case. Protesters, including West's family, have been demanding that prosecutors and police reveal West's cause of death. But Bruce Goldfarb, a spokesman for the state medical examiner, says they don't have it yet. “In some cases, such as with a hanging or shooting, the mechanism causing a death may be obvious,” Goldfarb said.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton and Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | December 11, 2013
Baltimore prosecutors on Tuesday said a heart condition and dehydration were factors in the death of a man being restrained by police during a July traffic stop. But the state medical examiner could not determine the degree to which the officers' actions - or Tyrone West's ailments - contributed to his death. The examiner couldn't conclude whether the death resulted from a homicide, accident or other means. The release of the findings came a day before a City Council hearing called to probe delays in the case.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun and By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | August 12, 2013
Three weeks after Tyrone West died in police custody after a Baltimore traffic stop, the state medical examiner's office said it is still investigating his cause of death amid growing calls for answers in the case. Protesters, including West's family, have been demanding that prosecutors and police reveal West's cause of death. But Bruce Goldfarb, a spokesman for the state medical examiner, says they don't have it yet. “In some cases, such as with a hanging or shooting, the mechanism causing a death may be obvious,” Goldfarb said.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | August 7, 2013
The state medical examiner's office says the autopsy of Tyrone West, who died last month in police custody after a traffic stop, is pending with no timetable.  Protesters, including West's family, have been demanding that prosecutors and police reveal West's cause of death. But Bruce Goldfarb, a spokesman for the state medical examiner, says they don't have it yet. "In some cases, such as with a hanging or shooting, the mechanism causing a death may be obvious," Goldfarb said.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | July 23, 2013
Family members of a man who died in police custody last week in Northeast Baltimore made emotional pleas Tuesday at a candlelight vigil for witnesses to come forward with what they saw. Gathered on the corner of Kitmore Road and Kelway Road, where Tyrone West, 44, was arrested Thursday night before being pronounced dead at a hospital, the family was joined by members of Baltimore's activist community, who accused police of "murder" and racial profiling....
NEWS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | January 28, 2013
Baltimore State's Attorney Gregg L. Bernstein on Monday reached out to the black community by answering call-in questions on WOLB's Larry Young Morning Show about his controversial decision to not prosecute the three Baltimore police officers involved in the death of East Baltimore resident Anthony Anderson. On Thursday, Bernstein said his office had determined that Detective Todd A. Strohman used appropriate action when he tackled Anderson during a September drug arrest that resulted in broken ribs and a lacerated spleen, which killed the 46-year-old man. Officers said Anderson was attempting to swallow drugs while walking away from them, which caused Strohman to use a “bear hug” to take him to the ground and preserve evidence.
NEWS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | January 25, 2013
Prosecutors will not charge the Baltimore police officers involved in arresting and fatally injuring a man — after finding that they did not use excessive force and followed police procedure when a detective tackled Anthony Anderson in a vacant lot last September. Baltimore State's Attorney Gregg L. Bernstein made the announcement Thursday, in a case that has roiled Anderson's East Baltimore community and sparked accusations of police brutality against black men. "I said to the family this morning, there's no question Mr. Anderson's death is a tragedy," Bernstein said.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | December 17, 2012
Activists gathered in front of a downtown Baltimore courthouse Monday, calling for State's Attorney Gregg L. Bernstein to bring charges against officers being investigated in the death of an East Baltimore man during an arrest. It has been more than a month since prosecutors were handed the police investigation into the death of 46-year-old Anthony Anderson, who was thrown to the ground during a drug arrest on Sept. 21. Police initially said it was believed Anderson died after ingesting or choking on drugs, but an autopsy ruled that the death was a homicide caused by blunt force trauma.
FEATURES
By Jay Boyar and Jay Boyar,ORLANDO SENTINEL | January 10, 2004
My Baby's Daddy is one-stop shopping - if you're in the market for pee-pee, poo-poo and flatulence jokes, that is. And if you still have room in your cart, keep in mind that the film also features a blue-light special on kick-in-the-family-jewels humor. Despite the singular "Daddy" of the title, there are actually three daddies in this imbecile comedy: Lonnie, G and Dom. You know that Lonnie (comedian Eddie Griffin, who co-wrote the script) is the brains of the operation because he wears huge eyeglasses and seems to be channeling Urkel.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | September 27, 2012
The city's new police commissioner brought his top brass on Wednesday night to meet with the family of Anthony Anderson, the 46-year-old man whose death in police custody last week has raised tensions in East Baltimore , the family's attorney confirmed. J. Wyndal Gordon, an attorney who is representing Anderson's family, said that Anthony W. Batts and members of his command staff visited the Andersons "to extend his condolences. " "We repeated our desire for justice in this case, and got a commitment from him that he will do what he can to ensure justice is served," Gordon said.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | November 8, 2012
Baltimore police have turned over to prosecutors their investigation into the death of Anthony Anderson, who the state medical examiner says died in September from blunt force traumaduring an arrest in East Baltimore.  Police spokesman Anthony Guglielmi said the case is now under prosecutorial review, and prosecutors did not give a timetable for a decision. Anderson, 46, was walking through a vacant lot when he was stopped by police officers  Detective Gregg Boyd, Detective Michael Vodarick and Detective Todd Strohman.  Relatives and others who say they witnessed the encounter say Anderson was unnecessarily thrown to the ground and that officers ignored his rapidly deteriorating condition, and have called for criminal charges.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | October 4, 2012
In today's story about the police custody death of Anthony Anderson , there's a reference to some police and prosecutors being irked about the release of Anderson's autopsy report to his family. At least one reader on Twitter wanted to know more about this. Detailed information about Anderson's injuries is key to building the investigation. For detectives working a controversial case and trying to piece together witness accounts  - some that may be wildly inaccurate or fabricated - holding back key information is a crucial tactic.
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