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By Gary Dretzka and Gary Dretzka,Chicago Tribune | July 11, 1993
RUN WITH THE HUNTED: ACHARLES BUKOWSKI READERCharles BukowskiHarperCollins! 497 pages, $27.50Charles Bukowski, survivor and unlikely literary lion, sits out there in San Pedro, Calif., far from the literary Establishment but close to the racetracks and skid row bars that once provided the material that filled his books and magazine scribblings.He also isn't all that distant from Hollywood, which in 1987, with the movie "Barfly," helped elevate him from cult status to a position of grizzled eminence.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 19, 2010
Margaret W. Fowler, a World War II nurse who later edited a pair of literary anthologies, died Wednesday of Parkinson's disease at the Broadmead retirement community. She was 87. Margaret Williamson, whose father owned Veneers LLC in Cockeysville and whose mother was an educator, was born in Baltimore and raised in Towson. She was a 1940 graduate of Bryn Mawr School and earned a bachelor's degree in English literature in 1945 from Wellesley College. Mrs. Fowler served as a Red Cross nurse in the Philippines and Japan near the end of World War II. While serving in Japan, she met Army Lt. James Randlett Fowler.
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NEWS
By Amy L. Miller and Amy L. Miller,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 20, 2000
WESTERN Maryland College Professor Kathy Mangan may not mention it much, but her students should know the wisdom she imparts in creative writing class comes from personal experience. Among her more recent literary triumphs is the publication of a poem in "Weavings 2000: The Maryland Millennial Anthology." The poem, called "Proof'," was first published in 1995 in her poetry collection, "Above the Tree Line," which was honored with a Pushcart Prize. "I'm always a little torn about talking about my work with" her students, said Mangan, who has taught American literature, women's literature and creative writing at the college since 1977.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Diane Scharper and Special to The Baltimore Sun | December 20, 2009
"Black Nature" Camille Dungy, editor, University of Georgia Press, $17.96. Two groundbreaking anthologies pass the read-again test with several excellent poems by local poets. Camille Dungy believes that white and black poets look differently at nature, with whites primarily noticing its beauty and blacks seeing its harshness. The view, Dungy says, is intensified by the black experience of slavery. An edgy mix of pastoral and political, her anthology, "Black Nature," testifies to her point although a few poems seem somewhat heavy.
NEWS
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,SUN STAFF | November 12, 1995
Beatles fans eagerly await the debut of a "reunion" recording, in which George, Paul and Ringo have taped their performances over a previously unheard John Lennon demo tape, "Free as a Bird."Will it sound like the Beatles? That's the question awaiting broadcast of "The Beatles Anthology," a three-night, six-hour television chronicle of the Fab Four due on ABC Nov. 19, Nov. 22 and Nov. 23, in which the recording will be premiered. (A second "new" song, "Real Love," will also be heard in the TV show.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | August 31, 1996
On ABC tonight, it's the return of the return of John, Paul, George and Ringo."Dr. Quinn, Medicine Woman" (8 p.m.-9 p.m., WJZ, Channel 13) -- Dr. Quinn's about to have her baby, so of course Mom and Sis arrive to help. Meanwhile, the Army gets orders to move the Indians to another reservation and Sully (Joe Lando) is injured trying to help his friend Cloud Dancing (Larry Sellers). CBS."Ushuaia: The Ultimate Adventure" (8 p.m.-9 p.m., WBAL, Channel 11) -- French adventurer Nicholas Hulot performs all sorts of derring-do, including: swimming with a 45-foot whale shark in Australia, hang-gliding in the Alps and walking atop a Manhattan construction site.
NEWS
By Lisa Respers and Lisa Respers,SUN STAFF | October 10, 2000
Maryland is filled with talented writers. That's what the editor of "Weavings 2000: The Maryland Millennial Anthology" discovered when he sent out the call for submissions late last year. The book, published through a grant from the Maryland Commission for Celebration 2000, will take center stage Oct. 22 at a reading and reception by the Howard County Poetry & Literature Society (HoCoPoLitSo). Michael S. Glaser edited the anthology and said he received thousands of submissions for the book -- which includes a mix of poetry and prose.
FEATURES
By Tim Warren and Tim Warren,Sun Staff Writer | March 13, 1995
What this anthology really shows is not so much that Field & Stream has published great outdoors writing, as the subtitle suggests, but that outdoors writing has improved markedly over the years. And, regrettably, the second does not always suggest the first, for as compilations of outdoor writings go, this one is competent but not distinctive.This volume's middling level of achievement is all the more in contrast to the editors' obvious high regard for its contents. One might expect a compilation to be a bit self-complimentary, but "The Best of Field & Stream" is egregiously so.Editor Jim Merritt notes in his long and somewhat obsequious introduction that the magazine has been a persistent voice in favor of conservation.
NEWS
By Stephen Margulies | December 20, 1992
THE BEST AMERICAN POETRY, 1992.Edited by Charles Simicand David Lehman.Scribner's.263 pages. $25."Every day men die from the lack of it . . . " said physician and poet William Carlos Williams. He could have been referring to an adequate diet, for instance. He certainly had lusty sympathy for the poor people he treated. But Williams was referring to poetry. Like physician and writer Anton Chekhov, Williams knew and felt the dangerous grittiness of life. Like Chekhov, he did not loll about on the narrow top of an ivory tower.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,SUN STAFF | April 24, 2003
She was too old for me -- old enough to be my mother. But my crush was deep, and I thought she was so refined. Her style was uptown, but a little funky, too. And it was something in the way she smiled at me from the pictures adorning my bedroom walls that made me feel appreciated and understood. At night, her buttery ballads lulled me into the sweetest sleep. When my mood was up, I sang along (way off-key) to her ebullient jams as my sister banged on my door, demanding that I shut up. But this sophisticated lady, Natalie Cole, did a 360 on me. After she took home a truckload of Grammys for her 1991 tribute-to-dad album, Unforgettable With Love, she left the funk behind, hung up the vampish dresses.
SPORTS
By BILL ORDINE | May 6, 2008
E:60 7 p.m. [ESPN] The ESPN show is scheduled to repeat a segment on Kimbo Slice, a Miami-based mixed martial arts fighter who got his start in street brawls. What updates Slice's story is his 43-second win earlier this year over ex-UFC headliner Tank Abbott and that Slice is now one of the main attractions for a prime-time MMA broadcast on May 31 on CBS.
NEWS
By SUSAN KING and SUSAN KING,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 29, 2006
When Shirley Temple Black walks onto the stage of the Shrine Exposition Hall in Los Angeles tonight to receive the 42nd Screen Actors Guild lifetime achievement award for her movie career and humanitarian efforts, most of her young fans will probably be shocked to see she's a 77-year-old grandmother. Because of television, video and DVDs, a whole new fan base of children around the world is enjoying her musicals from the 1930s - and they are sending her bushels of fan mail, just as fans did when the films were first released.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | July 18, 2004
The Right Word in the Right Place at the Right Time, by William Safire. Simon & Schuster. 408 pages. $27. Safire, political columnist and language cop for The New York Times, continues to demonstrate superhuman productivity. This latest collection of materials, first published in his "On Language" column in the Times' Sunday magazine, is his 24th book. (There are three others, done with a co-author, and a great speeches anthology.) If you aren't already familiar with Safire's loving defense of grammatical discipline, which seems unlikely, this could be a splendid introduction.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Noah Matthews and Noah Matthews,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | February 26, 2004
There were many summer nights in the rural Midwest when I was convinced that the Northern Lights were really spaceships looking for a place to land. It didn't help that I had seen every UFO movie made during the 1950s, and was scared of my own shadow. I'm not saying that UFOs are real, but the UFO Anthology, a three-CD set for Windows and Macintosh computers, sure makes a strong case for their existence. The collection was made several years ago, but it contains an encyclopedic guide to UFOs up to that time.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,SUN STAFF | April 24, 2003
She was too old for me -- old enough to be my mother. But my crush was deep, and I thought she was so refined. Her style was uptown, but a little funky, too. And it was something in the way she smiled at me from the pictures adorning my bedroom walls that made me feel appreciated and understood. At night, her buttery ballads lulled me into the sweetest sleep. When my mood was up, I sang along (way off-key) to her ebullient jams as my sister banged on my door, demanding that I shut up. But this sophisticated lady, Natalie Cole, did a 360 on me. After she took home a truckload of Grammys for her 1991 tribute-to-dad album, Unforgettable With Love, she left the funk behind, hung up the vampish dresses.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,Sun Staff | April 7, 2002
Three-time National Book Award winner Neal Pollack is wailing on the stage of a Hampden bar, a cowpunk band thrashing behind him. His shirt is on the floor. His bleached-blond hair is slick from the beer he dumped on himself earlier. And he is serving notice to the reigning literary establishment that he plans to use their weighty tomes for toilet paper. That means you, Norman Mailer. "Sontag, Roth, Mailer and Havel -- I wipe my [expletive] upon your novel!" Pollack screams into a microphone.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | November 7, 1999
LONDON -- Prince Harry will head into space, and humans will land on Mars.There will be sex purely for love and lust, while fertilization will be achieved through reproduction "banks."And the attention span could be in trouble.They sound like supermarket-tabloid headlines, but these speculations are among the predictions offered by 30 intellectuals peering into the next century.The Oxford University Press anthology "Predictions" is a provocative, playful and at times sobering look at the 21st century, as envisioned by scientists, writers and philosophers.
NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | December 3, 1995
The show may have been hyped like the Second Coming, but ratings for ABC's three-part "The Beatles Anthology" suggest a large part of America greeted the Fab Four's return with a shrug.Not that ABC should have expected much better, media-watchers suggest. After all, millions of people watched six hours of biographical material about a band that hasn't put out a record in 25 years, about four mop-tops with museum-piece hairdos, about music much of today's youth see as far removed from modern rock as Gilbert and Sullivan is from Little Richard.
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