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By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Staff Writer | May 9, 1992
A geography quiz:What land mass is, on average, three times higher than any other continent? Has air drier than the Sahara desert? Sees just one sunrise a year?Some have likened it to the moon, and NASA has even used its terrain to test equipment destined for a landing on Mars.The new film opening today in the big-screen IMAX theater of the Maryland Science Center provides the answer: "Antarctica.""Antarctica reminds us once again we have scarcely begun to understand our planet," intones the narrator midway through the film.
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By Mike King, The Baltimore Sun | January 11, 2014
During her second day on the Antarctic Peninsula, Elena Perry and her fellow students silently looked around the cold, dry landscape as the driver of their boat turned off the motor. In one of many such instances, the group was struck by how much Earth's southernmost continent abounded with life. "That was the first time we had gotten so close to the wildlife there, and it was an amazingly calm day," said Perry, 21, a junior ecology and evolutionary biology major at Yale. "There were hardly any waves.
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SPORTS
By Mike King, The Baltimore Sun | January 11, 2014
During her second day on the Antarctic Peninsula, Elena Perry and her fellow students silently looked around the cold, dry landscape as the driver of their boat turned off the motor. In one of many such instances, the group was struck by how much Earth's southernmost continent abounded with life. "That was the first time we had gotten so close to the wildlife there, and it was an amazingly calm day," said Perry, 21, a junior ecology and evolutionary biology major at Yale. "There were hardly any waves.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | March 22, 2013
Description: Unusual proteins within microbes allow the organisms to survive in cold and salty conditions in Antarctica, and could in theory help support life on Mars as well, according to NASA-funded study at the University of Maryland School of Medicine. The study revealed slight differences between core proteins in ordinary organisms and those known as Haloarchaea, which can live in severe conditions with extreme salinity or temperatures, for example. They studied such microbes from Deep Lake, a salty body of water in Antarctica, and found that atoms within the core proteins were more loosely connected, "allowing them to be more flexible and functional," DasSarma said.
NEWS
By Jean-Michel Cousteau | November 15, 1990
THIS MONTH, representatives from 40 nations that are party to the Antarctica Treaty are meeting in Santiago, Chile, to begin work on an international agreement to protect the frozen continent's unique and hauntingly majestic environment.The meeting culminates a year of international dialogue over whether mining should be allowed in the fragile Antarctic system.In mid-October, a group of scientists met under the auspices of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) in a multidisciplinary project called SEARISE to discuss evidence that vast Antarctic ice sheets are shifting and apparently fragmenting, possibly due to global warming.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Art Critic | February 2, 1993
If Antarctica is one of the few unspoiled places left on earth, surely it is because there are not enough people there -- yet -- to spoil it. Looking at Neelon Crawford's "Antarctic Polar Views" photographs at UMBC, one is struck above all by the "untouchedness" of it.There are a few shots in which boats or buildings or people appear, but for the most part Crawford has avoided not only people but animals. Only one picture has seals in it, and there are no penguins at all. Instead, Crawford brings us the ice, the snow, the water and the light that transforms them.
FEATURES
By Orlando Sentinel | October 30, 1994
Breaking the ice the conventional way can be challenging enough on any cruise. The adventuresome, however, can do it literally -- on a real icebreaker.When it's winter in North America, it's summer in Antarctica, and polar cruising is an ideal way to witness the stark beauty of the frozen continent.In its inhospitable season, Antarctica has been described as the coldest, driest, windiest place on Earth. December, however, is the height of austral summer -- when the ice-burdened sea surrounding the Antarctic peninsula relinquishes its mantle and swarms with krill, the keystone of the polar food chain.
FEATURES
By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,Sun Staff Writer | February 22, 1995
Washington -- The novelist who survived the Ice arrives on a day when the Baltimore-Washington area is paralyzed by the Slush.Schools in several districts are opening late. Morning rush hour is frenzied. Broadcast announcers break in breathlessly with weather updates. All because a light rain has fallen in the pre-dawn hours, adding a thin glaze to the ice and snow left over from a previous storm.But Elizabeth Arthur, who journeyed to the Ice -- Antarctica for the uninitiated -- to write her latest novel, is unfazed by this Mid-Atlantic madness.
FEATURES
By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Special to The Sun | March 14, 1994
The two best things served up by TV today are on cable, and are far from mainstream choices. One is a brand-new three-hour nature documentary by Sir David Attenborough, whose programs about flora and fauna are as good as they get. Tonight he takes on his coolest subject yet: "Antarctica: Life in the Freezer." Earlier today, Cinemax kicks off a weeklong tribute to Harold Lloyd with a noon showing of one of most inventive full-length comedies.* "Day One" (8-9 p.m., WJZ, Channel 13) -- Remember the scene in "Network" in which Faye Dunaway handed out cameras to underground radicals to have them film life, and crime, from their perspective?
FEATURES
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,Evening Sun Staff | October 10, 1990
There is a scientific principle that denies the possibility of total objectivity in an experiment, claiming that the very act of observation has an unavoidable effect on the elements involved in the experiment.That is the underlying conclusion of "Antarctica: A Presence on Ice," a production of Maryland Public Television that will be shown nationwide tomorrow night. It will be on MPT, channels 22 and 67, at 8 o'clock.What this hour shows is that some of this forbidding continent's worst enemies have been people who claim to be its friends -- the scientists who have traveled there to study its icy climes.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,frank.roylance@baltsun.com | April 6, 2009
The Antarctic ice sheets are melting, the krill are disappearing, and tourists are tramping about on fragile penguin habitat. For the next two weeks, those problems and more will land in Baltimore as the city hosts hundreds of diplomats, scientists and others attending the 32nd Antarctic Treaty Consultative Meeting. That's the body that governs the use of Antarctica by the international community, protects its environment and promotes scientific research. Nearly 400 people, including diplomats from 47 countries, will confer at the Baltimore Convention Center.
FEATURES
By Michael Phillips and Michael Phillips,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | July 25, 2008
Werner Herzog is a magnet for obsessives, and his lovely new film, Encounters at the End of the World, takes you places an ordinary documentary filmmaker might've gone to yet missed completely. At the invitation of the National Science Foundation, Herzog traveled to McMurdo Station in Antarctica, a U.S.-run enclave of 1,100 men and women who study the physical environment. We spend time with ecologists, biologists and survival-school instructors who teach people how not to get lost in a blinding snowstorm.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Harris Russell and Mary Harris Russell,Chicago Tribune | February 6, 2005
Poles Apart: Why Penguins and Polar Bears Will Never Be Neighbors By Elaine Scott. Viking, $17.99. Ages 9-14 years. One might expect the histories of exploration and of animal populations here, but what Elaine Scott does so well is convey the basic differences between the Arctic and the Antarctic themselves. Why is the Arctic not a continent, when Antarctica is? Because the Arctic "is a frozen sea, surrounded by the frozen edges of many different lands. ... Antarctica ... is a continent -- a mass of land surrounded by icy seas."
NEWS
December 3, 2004
Sources: "Exceptional astronomical seeing conditions above Dome C in Antarctica," Nature Magazine, Jon S. Lawrence, Michael C. B. Ashley, Andrei Tokovinin and Tony Travouillon; "Earth's best view of the stars - Antarctica's Dome C," The University of New South Wales, Faculty of Science; "An extremely cold extremely large telescope," Jon S. Lawrence, University of New South Wales, Australia; "2002-2003 campaign," and "Why Dome C?," Concordia, A new permanent continental station project. Research and Graphic by Cindy Jones-Hulfachor : South Florida Sun-Sentinel Panoramic view of Dome C, below, courtesy of Eric Aristidi, University of Nice, France
TRAVEL
By Special to the Sun | October 24, 2004
A Memorable Place A happy birthday trip to Antarctica By Ellen Johnson SPECIAL TO THE SUN When I was in sixth grade, my teacher read aloud each week from Richard Halliburton's Complete Book of Marvels -- a great book, which described many of the wonders of the world and Halliburton's adventures seeing them. This inspired a schoolgirl's imagination. Ever since that time, I've wanted to see the world. As a single woman, I carefully planned my trips a couple of years in advance. When people asked me what my hobby was, I replied, "Planning my next vacation."
NEWS
July 31, 2004
Margaret H. Renoff, a homemaker and world traveler, died of Alzheimer's disease Sunday at Sunrise assisted living in Severna Park. The former Roland Park resident was 90. Margaret Houghton was born and raised in a rowhouse in the 1700 block of N. Calvert St. She was a 1932 graduate of Western High School and earned a bachelor's degree in education from the Johns Hopkins University in 1936. In 1937, she married Paul V. Renoff, owner of Renoff & Associates. For many years, she assisted her husband in the operation of the business, which designed and distributed electrical equipment.
SPORTS
By Assoicated Press | October 22, 1992
ST. PAUL, Minn. -- Four women plan to go where no women have gone before -- on a 1,500-mile journey across Antarctica.The American Women's Trans-Antarctica Expedition leaves ,X Sunday on a journey on which they'll ski for four months across the continent, pulling sleds of food and supplies. The wind will be up to 100 mph, with temperatures dipping to 50 below zero."The challenge is whether we can ski across this thing [without dogsleds] and pull it off, make this distance when no women have done this," expedition leader Ann Bancroft said.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,frank.roylance@baltsun.com | April 6, 2009
The Antarctic ice sheets are melting, the krill are disappearing, and tourists are tramping about on fragile penguin habitat. For the next two weeks, those problems and more will land in Baltimore as the city hosts hundreds of diplomats, scientists and others attending the 32nd Antarctic Treaty Consultative Meeting. That's the body that governs the use of Antarctica by the international community, protects its environment and promotes scientific research. Nearly 400 people, including diplomats from 47 countries, will confer at the Baltimore Convention Center.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | February 27, 2004
Scientists working in Antarctica have found fossils of what appear to be two previously unknown species of dinosaurs - a six-foot meat-eater, and one of the earliest plant-eaters ever. The discoveries add to the small, but growing list of dinosaurs unearthed in Antarctica since 1986. Scientists said the animals adapted and thrived in a climate more akin to the Pacific Northwest than to Antarctica today. "It was more lush," said biologist Judd Case of Saint Mary's College of California, a co-leader of one of the teams that reported their finds in Washington yesterday.
FEATURES
By Tom Dunkel and Tom Dunkel,SUN STAFF | February 6, 2004
The Ice Land cometh. Think it's cold here? Sometime this morning, Gus McLeod, a 49-year-old gonzo adventure pilot from Laytonsville, will point the nose of a pencil-thin, fiberglass fuselage toward Antarctica and embark on the most daunting leg of a planned 28,000-mile, pole-to-pole, first-ever solo flight around the world in a single-engine plane. Ah, Antarctica. The Great White South. The place even Eskimos regard as forlorn and where a trillion penguins waddle without fear. While Marylanders are busy braving icy sidewalks, McLeod is leaving behind the comforts of Ushuaia, Argentina, and taking the 30-hour risk of a lifetime.
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