Advertisement
HomeCollectionsAntarctic Peninsula
IN THE NEWS

Antarctic Peninsula

FEATURED ARTICLES
TRAVEL
May 6, 2007
This picture of Paradise Bay was taken last November during an Antarctic cruise. Dwarfed by the gargantuan mountains and glaciers of the Antarctic Peninsula is the Argentine base Almirante Brown, one of the few places where it is actually possible to set foot on the continent. Anne-Marie Sack Parkville The Sun welcomes readers' submissions for "My Best Shot." Photos should be accompanied by a description of when and where you took the picture and your name, address and phone number. Submissions cannot be individually acknowledged or returned, and upon submission become the property of The Sun. Write to: Travel Department, The Sun, 501 N. Calvert St., Baltimore 21278, or e-mail Travel@baltsun.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
By Mike King, The Baltimore Sun | January 11, 2014
During her second day on the Antarctic Peninsula, Elena Perry and her fellow students silently looked around the cold, dry landscape as the driver of their boat turned off the motor. In one of many such instances, the group was struck by how much Earth's southernmost continent abounded with life. "That was the first time we had gotten so close to the wildlife there, and it was an amazingly calm day," said Perry, 21, a junior ecology and evolutionary biology major at Yale. "There were hardly any waves.
Advertisement
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | February 17, 1991
The United States and the Soviet Union have agreed to establish a research station on the drifting ice of the Weddell Sea in their first joint scientific effort in Antarctica.Researchers hope the station's 31 workers will obtain new data about the ice-covered sea and the floor beneath it, probably the least-known oceanic region on Earth.The plan is for the Soviet ice-breaking research ship, Akademik Federov, to set up the station in January and February 1992 on a large ice floe in the southwest part of the Weddell Sea.The station is expected to drift north, parallel to the Antarctic Peninsula, along the edge of the submerged continental shelf.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance, The Baltimore Sun | November 15, 2010
Scientists flying high above the South Pole have made the first high-altitude radar measurements of the snow and ice beneath the pole's Scott-Amundsen Research Station. A radar beam transmitted from a four-engine NASA jetliner flying at 39,000 feet penetrated nearly 3 kilometers of ice to the bedrock, then returned to the plane. The radar echoes were converted into a shadowy profile of the layered ice and the bedrock. The feat was part of the second season of Operation IceBridge.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance, The Baltimore Sun | November 15, 2010
Scientists flying high above the South Pole have made the first high-altitude radar measurements of the snow and ice beneath the pole's Scott-Amundsen Research Station. A radar beam transmitted from a four-engine NASA jetliner flying at 39,000 feet penetrated nearly 3 kilometers of ice to the bedrock, then returned to the plane. The radar echoes were converted into a shadowy profile of the layered ice and the bedrock. The feat was part of the second season of Operation IceBridge.
SPORTS
By Mike King, The Baltimore Sun | January 11, 2014
During her second day on the Antarctic Peninsula, Elena Perry and her fellow students silently looked around the cold, dry landscape as the driver of their boat turned off the motor. In one of many such instances, the group was struck by how much Earth's southernmost continent abounded with life. "That was the first time we had gotten so close to the wildlife there, and it was an amazingly calm day," said Perry, 21, a junior ecology and evolutionary biology major at Yale. "There were hardly any waves.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | February 27, 2004
Scientists working in Antarctica have found fossils of what appear to be two previously unknown species of dinosaurs - a six-foot meat-eater, and one of the earliest plant-eaters ever. The discoveries add to the small, but growing list of dinosaurs unearthed in Antarctica since 1986. Scientists said the animals adapted and thrived in a climate more akin to the Pacific Northwest than to Antarctica today. "It was more lush," said biologist Judd Case of Saint Mary's College of California, a co-leader of one of the teams that reported their finds in Washington yesterday.
NEWS
April 22, 2005
ANTARCTIC GLACIERS SHRINK About 90 percent of the glaciers on the Antarctic Peninsula have shrunk in the past half century, scientists reported today in a study of an area long regarded as a "canary in the coal mine" because of its sensitivity to climate change. Researchers for the British Antarctic Survey analyzed 100 satellite images and 2,000 aerial photos and found that since 1953, 212 of the 244 glaciers on the west side of the peninsula had retreated an average of about 2,000 feet.
NEWS
By Elizabeth L. Piccirillo and Elizabeth L. Piccirillo,SUN STAFF | February 20, 2004
A Maryland pilot who hoped to become the first to circumnavigate the globe by flying over both poles in a single-engine aircraft abandoned the effort yesterday and began his return home. Gus McLeod, 49, of Laytonsville, said by satellite phone yesterday that severely cold weather and a series of mechanical difficulties made reaching Antarctica impossible. The amateur aviator, who started his flight from College Park on Dec. 29, said he encountered trouble early on, when his plane's electrical system malfunctioned over Cuba, forcing him to return to Florida for repairs.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | November 24, 2007
They were modern adventure travelers, following the doomed route of Ernest Shackleton to the frozen ends of the Earth. They paid $7,000 to $16,000 to cruise on a ship that had proudly plowed the Antarctic for 40 years. But sometime early yesterday, the Explorer, fondly known in the maritime world as "the little red ship," quietly struck ice. There were the alarms, then the captain's voice on the public address system calling all 154 passengers and crew to the lecture hall, according to passenger accounts on the radio and others relayed from rescuers and the tour operator.
TRAVEL
May 6, 2007
This picture of Paradise Bay was taken last November during an Antarctic cruise. Dwarfed by the gargantuan mountains and glaciers of the Antarctic Peninsula is the Argentine base Almirante Brown, one of the few places where it is actually possible to set foot on the continent. Anne-Marie Sack Parkville The Sun welcomes readers' submissions for "My Best Shot." Photos should be accompanied by a description of when and where you took the picture and your name, address and phone number. Submissions cannot be individually acknowledged or returned, and upon submission become the property of The Sun. Write to: Travel Department, The Sun, 501 N. Calvert St., Baltimore 21278, or e-mail Travel@baltsun.
NEWS
April 22, 2005
ANTARCTIC GLACIERS SHRINK About 90 percent of the glaciers on the Antarctic Peninsula have shrunk in the past half century, scientists reported today in a study of an area long regarded as a "canary in the coal mine" because of its sensitivity to climate change. Researchers for the British Antarctic Survey analyzed 100 satellite images and 2,000 aerial photos and found that since 1953, 212 of the 244 glaciers on the west side of the peninsula had retreated an average of about 2,000 feet.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | February 27, 2004
Scientists working in Antarctica have found fossils of what appear to be two previously unknown species of dinosaurs - a six-foot meat-eater, and one of the earliest plant-eaters ever. The discoveries add to the small, but growing list of dinosaurs unearthed in Antarctica since 1986. Scientists said the animals adapted and thrived in a climate more akin to the Pacific Northwest than to Antarctica today. "It was more lush," said biologist Judd Case of Saint Mary's College of California, a co-leader of one of the teams that reported their finds in Washington yesterday.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | February 17, 1991
The United States and the Soviet Union have agreed to establish a research station on the drifting ice of the Weddell Sea in their first joint scientific effort in Antarctica.Researchers hope the station's 31 workers will obtain new data about the ice-covered sea and the floor beneath it, probably the least-known oceanic region on Earth.The plan is for the Soviet ice-breaking research ship, Akademik Federov, to set up the station in January and February 1992 on a large ice floe in the southwest part of the Weddell Sea.The station is expected to drift north, parallel to the Antarctic Peninsula, along the edge of the submerged continental shelf.
NEWS
By Earl Lane and Earl Lane,NEWSDAY | September 24, 2004
WASHINGTON - Scientists are finding new evidence some glaciers in Antarctica may be slip-sliding away, a process with potentially serious consequences over the long term for global sea levels. In a study published online today by the journal Science, a team of researchers reports that several glaciers in West Antarctica are thinning more rapidly than a decade ago. While most of the thinning is close to the coast, one of the largest ice masses, the Pine Island Glacier, is thinning at an accelerated rate as far as 186 miles inland.
FEATURES
By Dan Leeth and Dan Leeth,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 20, 1998
PALMER ARCHIPELAGO, Antarctica - Dorothy's right. This is definitely not Kansas anymore. Flung by the sea, I've sailed into the Land of Awes.To both starboard and port, mountainous islands rip skyward, jutting from water that defines navy blue. Only the sharpest, most jagged ridges expose daggers of anvil-black rock. Thick mantles of glacial ice smother the rest, concealing summits and slopes beneath mounds of glistening white.Inspiring as they seem, these ocean-piercing Everests are but the first fragments of the last land on earth.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.