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Answering Questions

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BUSINESS
By Gerald Graham and Gerald Graham,Knight-Ridder | October 15, 1990
A wit once commented, "I asked what time it was and he told me how to build a watch."This expression describes the two most common errors in responding to questions during meetings and presentations -- not answering the question and giving too much detail.To the question, "Do you think our current inventory level is sufficient for the next month?" the manager responded, "You know, we have changed our ordering procedures, and that has resulted in the mix of inventory we currently stock." The manager continued for another five minutes on the subject and still did not answer the question.
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SPORTS
By Jeff Zrebiec and The Baltimore Sun | September 22, 2014
Offering an emphatic response to what he perceived as an attack on his organization's integrity, Ravens owner Steve Bisciotti on Monday rebutted a recent report saying that the organization engaged in a “pattern of misinformation and misdirection” following Ray Rice's arrest in February. In an unusual, nearly 50-minute news conference that brought the national media to the team's Owings Mills training facility, Bisciotti again acknowledged the organization's faults in how it handled the fallout of the former running back's assault on his then-fiancee, Janay Palmer, in an Atlantic City, N.J., casino elevator.
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FEATURES
By Deborah L. Jacobs and Deborah L. Jacobs,CHRONICLE FEATURES | March 24, 1996
Most job-hunters know not to ask questions about money or benefits until they're on the verge of getting an offer. But employers don't usually follow the same protocol. Early on they want to know your most recent salary and what you want to make at the next job.Companies don't want to waste time with candidates who're looking for a lot more money than the job pays. Nor are they eager to recruit someone who'll be taking a substantial pay cut and may soon jump ship for a better deal.But if you reveal what you now earn, you may limit what the next place is willing to pay. If you're too cagey, you may knock yourself out of the running.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | September 3, 2014
Antibiotics have saved countless lives over the years, but their overuse has lead to problems including antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Dr. Mary R. Clance, an epidemiologist at Anne Arundel Medical Center, discusses the history, troubles and appropriate uses of the drugs. How have antibiotics contributed to public health since their discovery and what is their status now? The collective memory of death from infectious disease is short-lived. Death from pneumonia, puerperal fever, post-operative infection, urinary and skin infections were commonplace just two generations ago. Pneumonia was the leading cause of death at the beginning of the 20th century.
NEWS
By Dan Berger | July 28, 1999
Don't give up on the O's now. Lost causes are the best.Nobody beats George W. Bush in a poll while he is off stage not answering questions. As soon as he is a real candidate subject to scrutiny, there's no telling who might.Some big Ohio Democrats want to run Jerry Springer for the Senate. Shows what they think of the Senate.The Rev. Mary W. Conaway for mayor! She preaches in the capital of the Philistines.
NEWS
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | March 11, 2007
As a journalist for cable channel CNN, 34-year-old Thomas Roberts usually is the one making the inquiries. But in Sins of the Father, a compelling documentary on the sexual abuse he suffered at the hands of a Catholic priest at Towson's Calvert Hall High School, he's the one answering questions. SINS OF THE FATHER / / Airs at 10 p.m. tomorrow on CNN
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun TV Critic | September 30, 1991
You've seen the studies showing that thousands of kids don't know where Canada, Mexico or even Washington, D.C., is. "Where in the World Is Carmen San Diego?" is PBS' answer to that geography gap.Carmen" is a half-hour game show debuting at 5:30 tonight on MPT (Channels 22 and 67) that tries to teach geography #F between songs, skits, jokes and general silliness. It's based on the computer game in which players try to track down master criminal Carmen San Diego and her gang.In tonight's episode, the Mona Lisa is stolen by Vic The Stick.
NEWS
By Sarah Pekkanen and Sarah Pekkanen,SUN STAFF | May 1, 1998
Joseph R. Metheny dragged his hands across his face, listening as his voice was played yesterday in Baltimore Circuit Court in a tape-recorded confession he gave to police more than a year ago."I killed her. I'm a very sick person," Metheny is heard saying on the tape in response to questions by Baltimore homicide Detective Homer M. Pennington Jr.Metheny, 43, on trial for murder in the stabbing death of Kimberly Spicer, 23, confessed to police hours after her body was found near his Southwest Baltimore trailer on Dec. 15, 1996.
NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,SUN STAFF | April 29, 1997
Oakland Mills High School's "It's Academic" team won the Baltimore area championship last weekend, narrowly defeating teams from Towson and Hammond high schools.The three-student team -- senior Matthew Gealy and juniors Rachel Whitmore and Owen Read -- pulled out the championship match by answering the final question correctly with no time remaining."They won an exciting match that went back and forth -- the tension was like we were at the state football championships," said Kevin Shea, a drama and English teacher at Oakland Mills and one of the team's coaches.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach | July 28, 1997
The networks may be on automatic pilot, airing little but repeats, but thank goodness for cable operations like Comedy Central, which use the summer to debut all sorts of new programs.Tonight, it's a game show called "Win Ben Stein's Money" (7: 30 p.m.-8 p.m.). The premise: bit actor ("Ferris Bueller's Day Off"), former Nixon speech- writer and allegedly really smart guy Ben ++ Stein starts off the show with $5,000, and three contest- ants try to win chunks of that stash by answering questions -- often in competition with Stein himself, who is paid only what is left at show's end.Stein tries to come off as one supremely sanctimonious dude, sounding like Alfred Hitchcock with an Ivy League accent.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | August 7, 2014
As kids spend time in the water, officials warn parents to keep a close watch to ensure children don't drown. But there is another condition parents should know about: secondary drowning. It afflicts children who survive a near-drowning incident. And though it's uncommon, it can be fatal if left untreated, according to Dr. Melissa Sparrow, clinical director for pediatric inpatient and emergency services at Greater Baltimore Medical Center. What is secondary, or dry, drowning? Secondary drowning is a term that is used by the public, and less so by physicians.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | June 25, 2014
Hip dysplasia may not be obvious in newborns, but the disorder may already be affecting babies' development. And the sooner parents and caregivers get an evaluation and treatment, the easier the fix, according to Dr. Andrew Abramowitz, a board-certified orthopedic surgeon at MedStar Franklin Square Medical Center who trained in pediatric orthopedics. What is pediatric hip dysplasia and how common is it? Hip dysplasia (developmental dysplasia of the hip or DDH) is a spectrum of abnormalities of the ball and socket joint of the hip. It occurs in one in every 1,000 live births.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | June 11, 2014
The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Indiana State Department of Heath announced the nation's first case of Middle Eastern Respiratory Syndrome on May 2. Public health officials are keeping tabs on the virus, which has infected more than 800 people in more than a dozen countries, killing at least 310 of them, according to Reuters. But the officials don't believe the general public is at great risk. Dr. Peter Kadlecik, chief of infectious diseases with Kaiser Permanente, answers questions about this emerging virus.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | May 28, 2014
The winter was cold and snowy and the spring has been wet and warm, and that combination has made it easier for trees to produce much more pollen than normal. And that means runny noses and red, watery eyes for many who suffer from allergies. But Dr. Gregory Small, board-certified in internal medicine and a primary care physician at Greater Baltimore Medical Center at Texas Station, says that there are a number of ways to treat these allergies. What are the main spring allergens and symptoms?
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | April 16, 2014
Tooth decay has become a major problem among young children, and pediatric dentists are urging parents to take steps such as limiting sugary snacks and drinks. They also now advise brushing with a small amount of fluoride toothpaste and having a wellness exam at age 1, according to Dr. Norman Tinanoff, chief of the division of pediatric dentistry at the University of Maryland School of Dentistry. How big a problem are cavities in children? Tooth decay in children under age 6 is called early childhood caries by health professionals.
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly and The Baltimore Sun | February 12, 2014
One of the great things about my profession and social media -- Twitter, in particular -- is the immediacy with which writers can interact with readers. I'll be stepping away from Twitter for a little bit before I head down to Florida in a few weeks for spring training. So I decided last night to invite readers to ask me some Orioles questions, and I'd answer a chunk of them before I slip away temporarily. Here's a sampling of the questions I received and my answers (in most cases I expounded beyond the 140 characters permitted on Twitter)
NEWS
By ROGER SIMON | August 12, 1994
WASHINGTON -- If I ever needed a reminder as to why I am not smart enough to work at the White House, I got it the other day.Bill Clinton's top aides have been trying to figure out why he is doing so poorly in the polls.The economy is getting better, but he is doing worse.So what if I were working in the White House and the president dropped by my desk and asked me why he was was doing so lousy?"Could it be the lack of clear-cut foreign policy?" I would say."Naw," the president would say."
NEWS
By David L. Greene and David L. Greene,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | October 17, 2004
DAYTONA BEACH, Fla. -- As President Bush and his campaign team rev up their campaign for a race to the finish, they hope to revive the image of the likable, ordinary-guy president whose calm leadership soothed the country after the Sept. 11 attacks before he went to war in Afghanistan and Iraq. At the same time, the president plans to intensify his criticism of John Kerry, continuing to portray the Democratic candidate as a "Massachusetts liberal" whose views put him outside the mainstream.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | February 5, 2014
Putting too much stress on your joints? Or maybe arthritis has become an issue? Athletes, seniors or anyone in these categories could develop a bone spur, or extra bone produced by the body. There are some things to do at home if it causes short-term pain, and a doctor can offer suggestions if the pain doesn't stop, according to Dr. James Nace, an orthopedic surgeon with the LifeBridge Health Rubin Institute for Advanced Orthopedics and a physical therapist. What is a bone spur, and why does it form?
NEWS
By Scott Calvert, Justin George and Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | January 26, 2014
Howard County police on Sunday identified 19-year-old Darion Marcus Aguilar of College Park as the man who entered a store at The Mall in Columbia and fatally shot two employees before apparently killing himself. Officials said Aguilar was reported missing on the day of the shooting and that authorities had reviewed his journal, which depicted a "general unhappiness with his life. " But police said they still have not determined what fueled the lethal Saturday morning outburst that shattered the calm at the popular retail complex.
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