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By John Dorsey | January 25, 1996
Ansel Adams' photographs of the great scenery of the American West have become some of the most popular images in American photography. They capture the majesty of landscape and also speak of the aspirations of the human soul.An exhibit of about 50 Adams photographs, primarily from the first half of his career (he lived from 1902 to 1984), is on view at the gallery of Salisbury State University.Concurrently, there is a supporting exhibit of works by Edward Weston and Paul Strand, two photographers whose work influenced Adams.
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By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,sun art critic | September 15, 2007
Ansel Adams didn't invent the idea of the heroic American West, though he was certainly the 20th century's most persuasive photographic interpreter of it. The grand vistas of pristine wilderness that Adams recorded in his monumental landscapes of rugged mountain ranges and stands of virgin forest are among the most instantly recognizable images in all American art, and they made Adams famous even among people who knew little about photography or art....
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By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Art Critic | June 3, 1993
There are few names in the history of photography that conjure up such instant images as that of Ansel Adams. His photographs of the West have given us a vision of the magnificence of the American landscape that even the real thing must have a hard time living up to.Fewer know the diversity of Adams' work, especially early in his career, but now we have "Ansel Adams: The Early Years," which opened at the Baltimore Museum of Art yesterday. Organized by the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, the show contains about 75 images tracing Adams' career from "Wind" of about 1919 (when he was only 17)
NEWS
December 21, 2006
RUTH BERNHARD, 101 Photographer Ruth Bernhard, a renowned photographer whose black-and-white images of compelling shapes from female nudes to seashells were regarded as still-life art, died Monday in San Francisco. A resident there since 1953, she befriended and worked with some of her greatest contemporaries, including Ansel Adams, Imogen Cunningham, Wynn Bullock and Dorothea Lange.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Glenn McNatt and By Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | April 21, 2002
The Snake River, as photographed by Ansel Adams, is a shining ribbon that curves through stands of virgin forest toward a distant mountain whose summit is lit by electric flashes of St. Elmo's fire. The image is one of the most dramatic landscape photographs ever produced of the American West, and it became one of the signature pictures that helped make Adams famous even among people who knew little about photography. By the time of his death in 1984 at the age of 82, Adams was the most beloved photographer in America, admired as much for his tireless advocacy for environmental conservation as for his luminous, heroic photographs of a pristine wilderness that was fast disappearing.
NEWS
December 21, 2006
RUTH BERNHARD, 101 Photographer Ruth Bernhard, a renowned photographer whose black-and-white images of compelling shapes from female nudes to seashells were regarded as still-life art, died Monday in San Francisco. A resident there since 1953, she befriended and worked with some of her greatest contemporaries, including Ansel Adams, Imogen Cunningham, Wynn Bullock and Dorothea Lange.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,sun art critic | September 15, 2007
Ansel Adams didn't invent the idea of the heroic American West, though he was certainly the 20th century's most persuasive photographic interpreter of it. The grand vistas of pristine wilderness that Adams recorded in his monumental landscapes of rugged mountain ranges and stands of virgin forest are among the most instantly recognizable images in all American art, and they made Adams famous even among people who knew little about photography or art....
NEWS
January 2, 2002
4Kids: FEATURED SITE OF THE MONTH THE ART OF ANSEL ADAMS The Ansel Adams at 100 Web site presents this famous photographer's magnificent landscapes at www.sfmoma.org / adams / . Through seven photographs, this site traces the history and ideas behind Adams' celebrated black-and-white works. Travel back to November 1941 when Adams came upon a beautiful sunset in northern New Mexico. Via Quicktime video, Adams will tell you the story of how he captured the image in a matter of seconds. His mountain photographs detail what great lengths he would go to in order to catch the perfect image.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | May 29, 2003
For more on the visual arts, go to www.SunSpot.net/artDimitra Lazaridou, a Greek-born artist whose large-scale color night photographs of deserted streets, buildings and parks are on view at C. Grimaldis Gallery through June 28, creates intensely seen images of modern-day Athens, where she now lives, that evoke a passionate mystery of loss and regret. Lazaridou's pictures of neglected working-class neighborhoods, factory buildings and deserted streets pay homage to the recent past without in any sense glorifying it. Many of the pictures are taken in immigrant neighborhoods that once were prosperous but that now are clearly in decline.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | May 26, 2003
What will photography look like in the era after postmodernism? One answer may lie in the large-scale color photographs of Dimitra Lazaridou, on view at C. Grimaldis Gallery through June 28. Lazaridou, a Greek-born artist who trained in Germany at Berlin's Hochschule der Kunste, photographs deserted streets, buildings and parks at night in the city of Athens, where she is based, using a large-format view camera, long exposures - up to half an hour -...
ENTERTAINMENT
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | May 29, 2003
For more on the visual arts, go to www.SunSpot.net/artDimitra Lazaridou, a Greek-born artist whose large-scale color night photographs of deserted streets, buildings and parks are on view at C. Grimaldis Gallery through June 28, creates intensely seen images of modern-day Athens, where she now lives, that evoke a passionate mystery of loss and regret. Lazaridou's pictures of neglected working-class neighborhoods, factory buildings and deserted streets pay homage to the recent past without in any sense glorifying it. Many of the pictures are taken in immigrant neighborhoods that once were prosperous but that now are clearly in decline.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | May 26, 2003
What will photography look like in the era after postmodernism? One answer may lie in the large-scale color photographs of Dimitra Lazaridou, on view at C. Grimaldis Gallery through June 28. Lazaridou, a Greek-born artist who trained in Germany at Berlin's Hochschule der Kunste, photographs deserted streets, buildings and parks at night in the city of Athens, where she is based, using a large-format view camera, long exposures - up to half an hour -...
ENTERTAINMENT
By Glenn McNatt and By Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | April 21, 2002
The Snake River, as photographed by Ansel Adams, is a shining ribbon that curves through stands of virgin forest toward a distant mountain whose summit is lit by electric flashes of St. Elmo's fire. The image is one of the most dramatic landscape photographs ever produced of the American West, and it became one of the signature pictures that helped make Adams famous even among people who knew little about photography. By the time of his death in 1984 at the age of 82, Adams was the most beloved photographer in America, admired as much for his tireless advocacy for environmental conservation as for his luminous, heroic photographs of a pristine wilderness that was fast disappearing.
NEWS
January 2, 2002
4Kids: FEATURED SITE OF THE MONTH THE ART OF ANSEL ADAMS The Ansel Adams at 100 Web site presents this famous photographer's magnificent landscapes at www.sfmoma.org / adams / . Through seven photographs, this site traces the history and ideas behind Adams' celebrated black-and-white works. Travel back to November 1941 when Adams came upon a beautiful sunset in northern New Mexico. Via Quicktime video, Adams will tell you the story of how he captured the image in a matter of seconds. His mountain photographs detail what great lengths he would go to in order to catch the perfect image.
FEATURES
By ROB HIAASEN and ROB HIAASEN,SUN STAFF | October 24, 1998
To my dearest, brave war hero,I send you all my love -- to my one true sweetheart. Thanks for protecting our family, our land and our great nation. Everyone here is so very proud of you. You are so brave!-- Janet Calhoun to her husband, Pvt. Brad Calhoun, Company C, 7th West Virginia Regiment, Union Army Brad Calhoun's radio is willfully set to a classical music station. An Ansel Adams print pretties his living room wall. A living room. What is that? And the sofa, it's soft and bloodless.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Dorsey | January 25, 1996
Ansel Adams' photographs of the great scenery of the American West have become some of the most popular images in American photography. They capture the majesty of landscape and also speak of the aspirations of the human soul.An exhibit of about 50 Adams photographs, primarily from the first half of his career (he lived from 1902 to 1984), is on view at the gallery of Salisbury State University.Concurrently, there is a supporting exhibit of works by Edward Weston and Paul Strand, two photographers whose work influenced Adams.
FEATURES
By ROB HIAASEN and ROB HIAASEN,SUN STAFF | October 24, 1998
To my dearest, brave war hero,I send you all my love -- to my one true sweetheart. Thanks for protecting our family, our land and our great nation. Everyone here is so very proud of you. You are so brave!-- Janet Calhoun to her husband, Pvt. Brad Calhoun, Company C, 7th West Virginia Regiment, Union Army Brad Calhoun's radio is willfully set to a classical music station. An Ansel Adams print pretties his living room wall. A living room. What is that? And the sofa, it's soft and bloodless.
ENTERTAINMENT
By [SAM SESSA] | August 23, 2007
A new exhibit at St. John's College in Annapolis gives an intimate look at some of the more creative minds and personalities of the past couple of centuries. The Artist Revealed: Artist Portraits and Self-Portraits features portraits and self-portraits of Charlie Chaplin, C.S. Lewis, Ansel Adams and James McNeill Whistler, among others. Multiple mediums are used, including oils, etchings, lithography and woodcuts. The exhibit opens Saturday and runs through Oct. 21 at the gallery at St. John's College, 60 College Ave. in Annapolis.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Art Critic | June 3, 1993
There are few names in the history of photography that conjure up such instant images as that of Ansel Adams. His photographs of the West have given us a vision of the magnificence of the American landscape that even the real thing must have a hard time living up to.Fewer know the diversity of Adams' work, especially early in his career, but now we have "Ansel Adams: The Early Years," which opened at the Baltimore Museum of Art yesterday. Organized by the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, the show contains about 75 images tracing Adams' career from "Wind" of about 1919 (when he was only 17)
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