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By Julius Westheimer | October 24, 1997
"WHAT STYLE do you use in your 401(k) plan?" asks 401(k) Dimensions. The article describes three mutual fund categories: growth, income and "blended." It says:Most growth funds' returns come from capital gains -- stocks sold at a profit. Over five years, their average annual return is 15.5 percent. A danger signal: Over short periods, these funds can fluctuate widely, and you can suffer severe losses.Most returns on income funds come from interest payments. These funds, which invest mostly in bonds, showed a five-year average 5.7 percent annual return.
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NEWS
By Larry Perl, lperl@tribune.com | October 4, 2013
Ceramic artist Brian Beckenheimer admits that after owning As the Wheel Turns, a store in Harborplace for 27 years, and doing art shows for 34 years, "I was totally burned out. " He sold his house in Owings Mills last year and took the year off, moving to Arizona to be with his grown daughter, a hairstylist, and doing no pottery. Eight months later, he reconsidered. "I just got so bored with doing nothing," said Beckenheimer, 57, who now lives in Mount Washington and rents studio space with several kilns in a Woodberry-area warehouse that also houses several cabinetmakers and an architectural model maker.
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BUSINESS
By JULIUS WESTHEIMER | January 22, 1999
WANT TO take your stock market marbles and go home? Not so fast! " `You'll never go broke taking a profit' may be the worst advice ever given," says Better Investing. "Sure, you'll never go broke, but you'll never get rich, either. Don't sell your winners prematurely while keeping your losers. The best investments usually have `shelf lives' longer than six or 12 months."Fortune magazine points out: "If you invested $10,000 in the S&P 500-stock index just before the 1990 bear market and kept investing $100 a month, you would have $62,000 in eight years while someone who fled the market after a 10 percent drop and invested $100 a month in T-bills would have only $24,000."
BUSINESS
Eileen Ambrose | March 26, 2013
When it comes to generating income from investments, Americans' expectations for returns are significantly higher than what they are actually earning, according to a survey released this morning by Legg Mason Inc. “Our survey is telling us that income-oriented investors in the U.S. are coming up well short of their goals - almost 3 percent short - and that number could be significant especially for retired investors who need to live on the income their...
BUSINESS
By Andrew Leckey and Andrew Leckey,Tribune Media Services | January 27, 1993
With Bill Clinton in the White House, it's time to make plans for that certificate-of-deposit money you may have coming due.Keep it short term.It's also high time you thought about bond and bond-fund investments you may hold.Keep them short term.Because money-market fund holdings are inherently short term,content yourself there with simply hunting up the best-yielding funds available.Why all this short-term thinking? It's because this is a period to bide your time as Clinton policy-making settles in and recession eases out.Interest rates aren't expected to do much this year.
BUSINESS
By WERNER RENBERG and WERNER RENBERG,1991, Werner Renberg | October 20, 1991
"I currently have $54,000 in [certificate of deposit] IRAs from a lump sum and annual contributions," a Dallas woman writes. "I recently received a $10,280 distribution from a 401(k) plan and have 60 days to roll it over."Please explain how I can invest for five to 10 years in a no-load growth fund since the rest of my IRAs are so conservative. Am confused as to whether at my age (50) I should invest the total sum in one fund or several."Good question -- maybe similar to one you've been asking yourself.
BUSINESS
Eileen Ambrose | March 26, 2013
When it comes to generating income from investments, Americans' expectations for returns are significantly higher than what they are actually earning, according to a survey released this morning by Legg Mason Inc. “Our survey is telling us that income-oriented investors in the U.S. are coming up well short of their goals - almost 3 percent short - and that number could be significant especially for retired investors who need to live on the income their...
NEWS
Marta H. Mossburg | June 5, 2012
I hate to be the bearer of bad news. But the 6 percent drop in the Dow Jones Industrial Average in May, its worst performance in two years, and rising unemployment are not just bad news for people's retirement accounts. It means higher taxes for Marylanders — after yet another tax hike this month and a slowing economy. The reason: The state retirement system depends on a 7.75 percent annual return in order to meet its obligations to state workers. If the $37 billion fund does not meet its target, it ultimately leaves taxpayers on the hook to make up the shortfall.
BUSINESS
By Thomas Watterson and Thomas Watterson,Boston Globe | January 19, 1992
"Buy low, sell high," the maxim goes. For long-term investors, though, it's OK to buy high.When the stock market reaches record levels, many investors seem to have two reactions: Either they join the herd and jump in with every bit of spare cash they can find, or they decide they've missed the big advance, so it's too late to invest anything.With the Dow Jones industrial average holding above 3,200 -- an altitude it has reached by climbing more than 300 points in the last four weeks -- both reactions are wrong, money managers and market observers say. In most cases, they say, unsophisticated investors tend to make the latter mistake, staying out of the market because they are sure it's so high that it must be headed for a fall.
BUSINESS
By EILEEN AMBROSE | March 29, 2009
A frequent gripe about the new tax credit that's now showing up in paychecks is that it doesn't amount to much more than lunch money. An extra $10 or so a week could boost the economy if everyone spends it, but the dollars might seem insignificant to an individual. Or at least I was inclined to think so until my colleague, Dave Zeiler, said he is putting the credit toward raising his 401(k) contribution by 1 percentage point. That is meaningful, and it made me think about other things to do with the cash that could have a bigger impact in our lives than lunch at McDonald's.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | February 5, 2013
For years, the Virgin Mobile FreeFest has been the biggest annual concert with the most consistently impressive lineup in Maryland. Sweetgreen's Sweetlife: A Music and Food Festival has been a recent challenger since it held its first concert four years ago. And with today's release of this year's lineup, the battle for best local festival just got closer. The Sweetlife Festival will return to Columbia's Merriweather Post Pavilion on May 11. The lineup was announced via the YouTube clip above.  On the main stage: Phoenix Passion Pit Kendrick Lamar The Yeah Yeah Yeahs Gary Clark Jr. Solange Lindsey Stirling On the Treehouse stage: Holy Ghost!
NEWS
Marta H. Mossburg | June 5, 2012
I hate to be the bearer of bad news. But the 6 percent drop in the Dow Jones Industrial Average in May, its worst performance in two years, and rising unemployment are not just bad news for people's retirement accounts. It means higher taxes for Marylanders — after yet another tax hike this month and a slowing economy. The reason: The state retirement system depends on a 7.75 percent annual return in order to meet its obligations to state workers. If the $37 billion fund does not meet its target, it ultimately leaves taxpayers on the hook to make up the shortfall.
BUSINESS
By EILEEN AMBROSE | March 29, 2009
A frequent gripe about the new tax credit that's now showing up in paychecks is that it doesn't amount to much more than lunch money. An extra $10 or so a week could boost the economy if everyone spends it, but the dollars might seem insignificant to an individual. Or at least I was inclined to think so until my colleague, Dave Zeiler, said he is putting the credit toward raising his 401(k) contribution by 1 percentage point. That is meaningful, and it made me think about other things to do with the cash that could have a bigger impact in our lives than lunch at McDonald's.
BUSINESS
By Humberto Cruz and Humberto Cruz,Tribune Media Services | June 10, 2007
I get this question at least once a week. The answer is relevant whether you're retired or just starting out. You said something I don't understand or am misinterpreting. Your column and others suggest that, as a general rule, if no more than 4 percent of one's assets are spent each year during retirement, our money should last our lifetimes. But if my assets achieve a rate of return greater than 4 percent, wouldn't not only my money last but my principal also increase? Granted, there could be years where a 4 percent rate of return is not achieved.
NEWS
By Laura Vozzella and Laura Vozzella,SUN STAFF | March 16, 2004
Maryland prisoners who land jobs after they are freed are no less likely to commit more crimes and return to prison than those who don't find work, according to an Urban Institute study released yesterday. The study tracked 324 state prisoners for six months who returned to Baltimore in 2001, with the goal of determining what factors affected their chances for successfully re-entering society. Within six months of their release, one-third of the prisoners studied had been rearrested and 10 percent had been convicted of a crime, half of them on drug charges.
BUSINESS
By JULIUS WESTHEIMER | January 22, 1999
WANT TO take your stock market marbles and go home? Not so fast! " `You'll never go broke taking a profit' may be the worst advice ever given," says Better Investing. "Sure, you'll never go broke, but you'll never get rich, either. Don't sell your winners prematurely while keeping your losers. The best investments usually have `shelf lives' longer than six or 12 months."Fortune magazine points out: "If you invested $10,000 in the S&P 500-stock index just before the 1990 bear market and kept investing $100 a month, you would have $62,000 in eight years while someone who fled the market after a 10 percent drop and invested $100 a month in T-bills would have only $24,000."
BUSINESS
By David Conn and David Conn,Staff Writer | November 23, 1993
As millions of Americans prepare to feast on football and fowl, Legg Mason Inc. yesterday served up its 15th annual Thanksgiving List, a selection of a dozen stocks that historically has left investors' portfolios fatter than Legg's mutual funds.Many investment firms offer selected stock portfolios for their clients at various times of the year. Legg Mason's has attracted a following beyond the company's regional base, probably because of its consistent performance: The list has bettered the Standard & Poor's 500 index 12 out of the 15 years since its introduction, with a 28.7 percent average annual return, compared with the S&P's average 16.9 percent annual return, assuming reinvestment of dividends in both cases.
BUSINESS
By Humberto Cruz and Humberto Cruz,Tribune Media Services | June 10, 2007
I get this question at least once a week. The answer is relevant whether you're retired or just starting out. You said something I don't understand or am misinterpreting. Your column and others suggest that, as a general rule, if no more than 4 percent of one's assets are spent each year during retirement, our money should last our lifetimes. But if my assets achieve a rate of return greater than 4 percent, wouldn't not only my money last but my principal also increase? Granted, there could be years where a 4 percent rate of return is not achieved.
BUSINESS
By Julius Westheimer | October 24, 1997
"WHAT STYLE do you use in your 401(k) plan?" asks 401(k) Dimensions. The article describes three mutual fund categories: growth, income and "blended." It says:Most growth funds' returns come from capital gains -- stocks sold at a profit. Over five years, their average annual return is 15.5 percent. A danger signal: Over short periods, these funds can fluctuate widely, and you can suffer severe losses.Most returns on income funds come from interest payments. These funds, which invest mostly in bonds, showed a five-year average 5.7 percent annual return.
BUSINESS
By David Conn and David Conn,Staff Writer | November 23, 1993
As millions of Americans prepare to feast on football and fowl, Legg Mason Inc. yesterday served up its 15th annual Thanksgiving List, a selection of a dozen stocks that historically has left investors' portfolios fatter than Legg's mutual funds.Many investment firms offer selected stock portfolios for their clients at various times of the year. Legg Mason's has attracted a following beyond the company's regional base, probably because of its consistent performance: The list has bettered the Standard & Poor's 500 index 12 out of the 15 years since its introduction, with a 28.7 percent average annual return, compared with the S&P's average 16.9 percent annual return, assuming reinvestment of dividends in both cases.
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