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By Luke Lavoie, llavoie@tribune.com | July 29, 2013
The Columbia Association Board of Directors voted Thursday to keep its annual charge for lien-payers at $0.68 per $100 of assessed property value in the 2015-16 budget. The annual charge has remained the same since it was lowered to that number in 2003. At a meeting earlier this month, the board asked members of CA staff, who recommended keeping the charge  the same, to explore scenarios if the rate were increased or decreasedby $0.02. According to CA Chief Financial Officer Susan Krabbe, $0.01 per $100 of assessed property value equates to approximately $500,000, meaning an increase or decrease of $0.02 would net CA a $1 million loss or gain in revenue.
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NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | August 12, 2014
In Baltimore, some business owners say they're constantly nagged by city fees for making improvements to their stores. Add a bike rack outside? There's a fee for that. Put up a security camera? Another fee. Add more lighting? There's a fee for that, too. That's why some are expressing disappointment that Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake used her first veto since taking office in 2010 to strike down a bill aimed at reducing or eliminating many of the so-called "minor privilege" fees the city charges.
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TRAVEL
By Tom Parsons and Tom Parsons,McClatchy-Tribune | August 17, 2008
If you are looking for deals in the current travel climate, it is time to get creative. One of the ways you can save creatively is by considering two new airline affinity credit cards. For $139, travelers can earn enough miles on US Airways for a trip to Europe, Hawaii, the Caribbean or Mexico. You can earn these miles by signing up for both a US Airways Visa Signature card, with an annual fee of $90, and a US Airways World MasterCard, which has an annual fee of $49. The US Airways Visa Signature card offers 25,000 bonus miles after your first purchase.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | April 18, 2014
As Anne Arundel County officials begin spending money from new stormwater fees on environmental projects, they're hoping to make it easier for property owners to appeal the fees. Since the fees were billed for the first time last summer, more than 300 property owners have appealed. More than one-third of appellants missed the Aug. 15 appeal deadline, but the Department of Public Works is reviewing their appeals anyway. Chris Phipps, the county's director of public works, is seeking approval of a bill before the County Council that would legally allow this year's late appeals to be considered.
BUSINESS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | December 27, 1992
If Robert B. McKinley calls you a "knucklehead," don't get offended. He means it in the kindest way possible.That's the name he gives to people who still carry credit cards that charge an interest rate higher than 16 percent."
BUSINESS
By Andrew Leckey | September 30, 1994
The most recent sign that the apocalypse is upon us: Chevy Chase Bank of Maryland recently unveiled a Rolling Stones MasterCard emblazoned with the rock group's trademark "lips-with-protruding-tongue" emblem. Cardholders earn discounts on Rolling Stones merchandise and at participating music stores.That, along with the myriad of card offers being stuffed in your mailbox each week, should convince you that card issuers desperately want your business. It's a saturated market.This column has always maintained that it makes more sense to find a low-rate bank card than to chase after rebates and deals.
BUSINESS
By Andrew Leckey | September 17, 1993
American consumers have the opportunity to benefit from the lowest credit card rates in more than 20 years.The average bank card rate has fallen 2 percent in the past year to around 16 percent, but you may be able to cut that rate in half by shopping around.This column has railed for years about how high credit card rates remain no matter what occurs with savings rates. But now recession, consumer awareness and industrywide competition are making their presence felt."Since we've offered low-rate credit cards, we've seen explosive growth, our cardholders doubling to 60,000 in a year and a half," said Richard Rieser, president of Oak Brook Bank, Oak Brook, Ill. [800]
NEWS
January 10, 2014
Annual MLK dinner The 26th annual Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Awards Dinner will be held at 6 p.m. Friday, Jan. 17 at the La Fountaine Bleue, 7514 Ritchie Highway in Glen Burnie. Civil rights activist, Shirley Sherrod, will be the keynote speaker. Tickets are $65; VIP tickets are $100 and includes premium seating and a private reception before the dinner. For tickets and more information, call 410-760-4115 or go to mlkmd.org. Theater production "Shrek the Musical" runs through Jan. 26 at the Children's Theatre of Annapolis, 1661 Bay Head Road.
BUSINESS
By Andrew Leckey and Andrew Leckey,Tribune Media Services | August 27, 1991
The world of plastic is undergoing some changes in 1991. Current trends involving credit cards include:* A move to expand your use of cards to include taxis, movie theaters, fast-food restaurants, pizza delivery, supermarkets and health-care providers. The list keeps growing so long as you're willing to pay.* Dogged determination by banks, pressured by highly publicized economic woes, to keep credit card rates high. They feel they need the money more than you do and that you don't really care how much you pay anyway.
BUSINESS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | March 2, 2003
If you're the type of consumer who pays off your credit-card bill each month, are you also earning a perk from that credit card? You should be. Some experts estimate that more than 700 credit cards offer perks - such as cash back, free gas or saving on a new car. Many do so without charging an annual fee. Other cards reward your loyalty to an airline, a retailer or even a hotel chain. Newer perk cards even deposit rebate rewards into college savings plans. It's mind-boggling to wade through all the cards and their perks, but a number of Web sites can help.
NEWS
January 10, 2014
Annual MLK dinner The 26th annual Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Awards Dinner will be held at 6 p.m. Friday, Jan. 17 at the La Fountaine Bleue, 7514 Ritchie Highway in Glen Burnie. Civil rights activist, Shirley Sherrod, will be the keynote speaker. Tickets are $65; VIP tickets are $100 and includes premium seating and a private reception before the dinner. For tickets and more information, call 410-760-4115 or go to mlkmd.org. Theater production "Shrek the Musical" runs through Jan. 26 at the Children's Theatre of Annapolis, 1661 Bay Head Road.
NEWS
By Luke Lavoie, llavoie@tribune.com | July 29, 2013
The Columbia Association Board of Directors voted Thursday to keep its annual charge for lien-payers at $0.68 per $100 of assessed property value in the 2015-16 budget. The annual charge has remained the same since it was lowered to that number in 2003. At a meeting earlier this month, the board asked members of CA staff, who recommended keeping the charge  the same, to explore scenarios if the rate were increased or decreasedby $0.02. According to CA Chief Financial Officer Susan Krabbe, $0.01 per $100 of assessed property value equates to approximately $500,000, meaning an increase or decrease of $0.02 would net CA a $1 million loss or gain in revenue.
BUSINESS
By Chris Korman | December 3, 2012
Alan Rifkin, outside counsel for the Orioles and owner Peter Angelos, said Monday that reports of a possible MASN sale are innacurate. "There has been no contact," he said. "There has been no offer. There has been no discussion of it. MASN is not for sale. " According to John Ourand of the Sports Business Journal, Fox and Comcast have had negotiations with Peter Angelos about acquiring his majority share of the television network and the rights to both Orioles and Nationals games.
EXPLORE
October 22, 2012
Columbia Association wants legislation passed that will reclassify itself as a nonprofit community services corporation and remove all of its lien-payers from the protection of all Homeowners Association laws. CA recognizes only the 10 members of the Columbia Council as members of CA, excluding 100,000 residents on 37,000 lien-paying residential and commercial properties. The president of CA is not elected by lien-payers. My guess is that CA is probably the largest organization in the country where people are forced to pay an annual fee, are not considered members and can't vote for their executive.
NEWS
May 10, 2012
Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blakesays the new organizers she has selected for September's Baltimore Grand Prix - including a member of the legendary Andretti family - "have what it takes to move forward and make this world-class sporting event successful for Baltimore. " Isn't that what she said about the last group of people she brought in to save the race? That the lead promoter, Dale Dillon, was a race-savior who would make sure everything went smoothly this year? (Unless, as it happened, he stopped talking to his Baltimore-based partners and dropped off the face of the Earth?
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | January 20, 2012
With the Chesapeake Bay cleanup at a critical juncture, Gov. Martin O'Malley is calling on Marylanders to double down on their contribution to the effort, proposing to raise the "flush fee" every household pays from $2.50 to $5 a month, on average. Without the increase, administration officials warn, they face a $385 million shortfall starting this year in the funds needed to upgrade pollution controls at the state's biggest sewage treatment plants — most notably Baltimore's century-old Back River facility, the largest in Maryland.
BUSINESS
By David Conn Knight-Ridder News Service contributed to this column | July 22, 1993
He makes 'little guy'aware of RTC salesThe fund "seeks long-term growth of capital through investments in the common stocks of well-established companies with the potential for above-average growth in earnings," according to its prospectus.Other criteria include seasoned management; an above-average profit margin relative to competitors; strong cash flow; high return on equity and significant reinvestment of earnings. The minimum investment is $2,500, or $1,000 for retirement vehicles.Investing in blue chips is bold, but we're still waiting for the "Buy Low; Sell High" fund.
BUSINESS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,Staff Writer | February 25, 1992
Those responsible souls who pay their credit card bills on time month after month have long complained that banks charge them high interest rates to pay for the lapses of less creditworthy customers.Now, there are some signs of relief.A few large credit card issuers -- most notably American Express -- have started programs that let longtime customers who use their plastic regularly and pay promptly enjoy significantly lower rates than the average customer. And the people who track credit card rates say that it might just be the beginning.
NEWS
By Annie Linskey and Michael Dresser | January 9, 2012
Priority legislation in the 90-day General Assembly session that begins Wednesday • Gas tax : A blue ribbon commission recommended a 15-cent increase to the gas tax, which has not been raised since 1992. Senate President Miller has said he'd be more comfortable with a 10-cent increase. • Economic stimulus : Governor O'Malley, House Speaker Busch and Miller have all talked about spurring the state's construction industry with a larger than usual capital budget. A gas tax increase could pay for some of these projects.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller, The Baltimore Sun | November 9, 2011
The Anne Arundel County Council is considering legislation that would levy an annual fee on county residents to help reduce stormwater runoff. Councilman Chris Trumbauer, an Annapolis Democrat, introduced the bill at Monday night's meeting. The bill would permit a $35 annual fee on the property tax bill for residential properties and $25 for condos and townhomes; non-residential properties would be assessed depending on square footage. The fees would go into a dedicated fund for reducing stormwater runoff that would work to reduce the backlog of needed restoration and retrofit projects already identified and to get the county into compliance with state and federal regulations.
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