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Annie Proulx

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By Alice Steinbach and Alice Steinbach,Sun Staff Writer | May 15, 1994
Washington -- Annie Proulx, a writer who won almost every major fiction prize over the past year, has just been asked how it feels to be the literary equivalent of Whitney Houston."
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By Ken Fuson and Ken Fuson,Special to the Sun | December 15, 2002
That Old Ace in the Hole, by Annie Proulx. Scribner. 384 pages. $26. Annie Proulx is our literary explorer, venturing forth into mostly unchartered terrain (Newfoundland in The Shipping News, Wyoming in Close Range), then emerging with her notebook and imagination re-stocked with quirky facts, eccentric characters and memorable tales. This time, Proulx has set her creative sights on the arid and forlorn landscape of the Texas and Oklahoma panhandles, the states "stacked like dirty pots in the sink, their handles touching."
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By Ron Dicker and Ron Dicker,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 4, 2002
BEVERLY HILLS, Calif. - Pulitzer Prize-winning author E. Annie Proulx casually dropped a bomb: "I hope never to write another novel," said Proulx, whose second novel, The Shipping News, won the Pulitzer Prize and National Book Award and has been made into a major-release film starring Kevin Spacey. "I prefer writing short stories. They're difficult and demanding, but they don't eat you alive the way a novel does." At that particular moment, Proulx might have been feeling especially consumed.
FEATURES
By Ron Dicker and Ron Dicker,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 4, 2002
BEVERLY HILLS, Calif. - Pulitzer Prize-winning author E. Annie Proulx casually dropped a bomb: "I hope never to write another novel," said Proulx, whose second novel, The Shipping News, won the Pulitzer Prize and National Book Award and has been made into a major-release film starring Kevin Spacey. "I prefer writing short stories. They're difficult and demanding, but they don't eat you alive the way a novel does." At that particular moment, Proulx might have been feeling especially consumed.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and By Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | December 25, 2001
Pundits often put down audiobooks as Classic Comics for commuters. But I can't wait to find a copy of Robert Joy reading Annie Proulx's novel The Shipping News. To my eye and ear, Proulx's mannered, deadly patches revive when read out loud - and Joy, who has a small part in the movie, is just the kind of idiosyncratic actor who can pull off her prose. The syntax that unwinds and contracts, often in staccato fashion, and the lilting lists and descriptions come together in an invented brogue that has as much to do with Proulx's own rhythmic sense as it does with the accents of her upstate New York and Newfoundland settings.
NEWS
By Dorothea Straus and Dorothea Straus,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 2, 1996
"Accordion Crimes," by E. Annie Proulx. New York: Scribner. 381 pages. $25.In our time, when confessional memories and autobiographical fiction are the vogue, E. Annie Proulx, a powerfully omniscient author, is an excepiton. "Accordion Crimes" is a collection of takes on the immigrant experience of the 20th century. The novel, unchronological, opens in Sicily in 1890. The handcrafted green accordion originates there and is transported to New Orleans, where its maker, a Sicilian laborer, meets a violent death.
FEATURES
By Tim Warren | April 21, 1993
"Postcards," E. Annie Proulx's first novel, has won the 1993 PEN/Faulkner Award for Fiction, the last of the four major awards to be given this literary season. Ms. Proulx became the first woman to win the PEN/Faulkner since it was founded in 1980."Postcards" describes the 40-year wanderings of Loyal Blood, who is forced to flee his Vermont farm after committing a crime and stays in touch with his family by sending postcards.It was selected by judges Frederick Busch, Janet Kauffman and Rudolfo Anaya from more than 275 novels and short story collections published in the United States in 1992.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tess Lewis and By Tess Lewis,Special to the Sun | April 25, 1999
"Close Range: Wyoming Stories," by Annie Proulx with illustrations by William Matthews. Scribner. 285 pages. $25.Local color, rough weather and even tougher circumstances have always dominated Annie Proulx's fiction. "Shipping News," her portrayal of a widowed, third-rate newspaperman's struggle not just to survive but to prevail in a harsh Newfoundland climate, won a Pulitzer Prize and a National Book Award. Proulx's novel "Postcards" and her collection "Heart Songs and Other Stories" chronicled the despair of New England farmers hovering on the brink of failure.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Ken Fuson and Ken Fuson,Special to the Sun | December 15, 2002
That Old Ace in the Hole, by Annie Proulx. Scribner. 384 pages. $26. Annie Proulx is our literary explorer, venturing forth into mostly unchartered terrain (Newfoundland in The Shipping News, Wyoming in Close Range), then emerging with her notebook and imagination re-stocked with quirky facts, eccentric characters and memorable tales. This time, Proulx has set her creative sights on the arid and forlorn landscape of the Texas and Oklahoma panhandles, the states "stacked like dirty pots in the sink, their handles touching."
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY | February 9, 1995
I have a curiosity that won't quit about the materials transit riders read.Let's not bother with the newspapers. It's the books and magazines that tell you something more, that give you clues about people's lives.For many years, my chief transit conveyance has been the No. 61 bus, the Roland Park-Inner Harbor bus line. In one form or another, I've been taking it to work or school since about 1959, when the fare was a dime. Back then, I was carrying school books, the Baltimore Catechisms, Latin grammar and Charles Dickens' novels -- not exactly page-turner material.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and By Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | December 25, 2001
Pundits often put down audiobooks as Classic Comics for commuters. But I can't wait to find a copy of Robert Joy reading Annie Proulx's novel The Shipping News. To my eye and ear, Proulx's mannered, deadly patches revive when read out loud - and Joy, who has a small part in the movie, is just the kind of idiosyncratic actor who can pull off her prose. The syntax that unwinds and contracts, often in staccato fashion, and the lilting lists and descriptions come together in an invented brogue that has as much to do with Proulx's own rhythmic sense as it does with the accents of her upstate New York and Newfoundland settings.
FEATURES
By Gary Dorsey and Gary Dorsey,SUN STAFF | July 26, 2001
Baltimore can abide taunting from Washington toadies, forever endure dissing from New York glitterati and may yet survive a possible cold shoulder by the U.S. Olympic Committee. But neglected by Encyclopedia Britannica? When word leaked recently that the consummate chronicler of worldly knowledge had commissioned a set of potentially punky, impressionistic pieces about American places, we called to find out just who would account for Baltimore's magical grit. "Alas, Baltimore is not represented among the cities about which we have these subjective, impressionistic, personal city essays," said Tom Panelas, Britannica's public relations director.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tess Lewis and By Tess Lewis,Special to the Sun | April 25, 1999
"Close Range: Wyoming Stories," by Annie Proulx with illustrations by William Matthews. Scribner. 285 pages. $25.Local color, rough weather and even tougher circumstances have always dominated Annie Proulx's fiction. "Shipping News," her portrayal of a widowed, third-rate newspaperman's struggle not just to survive but to prevail in a harsh Newfoundland climate, won a Pulitzer Prize and a National Book Award. Proulx's novel "Postcards" and her collection "Heart Songs and Other Stories" chronicled the despair of New England farmers hovering on the brink of failure.
NEWS
By Dorothea Straus and Dorothea Straus,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 2, 1996
"Accordion Crimes," by E. Annie Proulx. New York: Scribner. 381 pages. $25.In our time, when confessional memories and autobiographical fiction are the vogue, E. Annie Proulx, a powerfully omniscient author, is an excepiton. "Accordion Crimes" is a collection of takes on the immigrant experience of the 20th century. The novel, unchronological, opens in Sicily in 1890. The handcrafted green accordion originates there and is transported to New Orleans, where its maker, a Sicilian laborer, meets a violent death.
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY | February 9, 1995
I have a curiosity that won't quit about the materials transit riders read.Let's not bother with the newspapers. It's the books and magazines that tell you something more, that give you clues about people's lives.For many years, my chief transit conveyance has been the No. 61 bus, the Roland Park-Inner Harbor bus line. In one form or another, I've been taking it to work or school since about 1959, when the fare was a dime. Back then, I was carrying school books, the Baltimore Catechisms, Latin grammar and Charles Dickens' novels -- not exactly page-turner material.
FEATURES
By Alice Steinbach and Alice Steinbach,Sun Staff Writer | May 15, 1994
Washington -- Annie Proulx, a writer who won almost every major fiction prize over the past year, has just been asked how it feels to be the literary equivalent of Whitney Houston."
FEATURES
By Gary Dorsey and Gary Dorsey,SUN STAFF | July 26, 2001
Baltimore can abide taunting from Washington toadies, forever endure dissing from New York glitterati and may yet survive a possible cold shoulder by the U.S. Olympic Committee. But neglected by Encyclopedia Britannica? When word leaked recently that the consummate chronicler of worldly knowledge had commissioned a set of potentially punky, impressionistic pieces about American places, we called to find out just who would account for Baltimore's magical grit. "Alas, Baltimore is not represented among the cities about which we have these subjective, impressionistic, personal city essays," said Tom Panelas, Britannica's public relations director.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 26, 2006
Downloaded singles 1.Check on It, Beyonce and Slim Thug 2.Breaking Free, Gabriela and Troy 3.Unwritten, Natasha Bedingfield 4.Grillz (Dirty), Nelly featuring Paul Wall, Ali and Gipp 5.Dirty Little Secret, All-American Rejects [ Courtesy iTunes] Downloaded albums 1.High School Musical (Soundtrack), Various Artists 2.Brokeback Mountain (Unabridged), Annie Proulx 3.Back to Bedlam (Bonus Video Version), James Blunt 4.Brokeback Mountain (Original Motion Picture Soundtrack), Various artists 5. First Impressions of Earth, The Strokes [ Courtesy iTunes]
FEATURES
By Tim Warren | April 21, 1993
"Postcards," E. Annie Proulx's first novel, has won the 1993 PEN/Faulkner Award for Fiction, the last of the four major awards to be given this literary season. Ms. Proulx became the first woman to win the PEN/Faulkner since it was founded in 1980."Postcards" describes the 40-year wanderings of Loyal Blood, who is forced to flee his Vermont farm after committing a crime and stays in touch with his family by sending postcards.It was selected by judges Frederick Busch, Janet Kauffman and Rudolfo Anaya from more than 275 novels and short story collections published in the United States in 1992.
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