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Annie Hall

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NEWS
February 16, 2007
On February 10, 2007, ELIZABETH ANNIE HALL. On Friday, friends may call at Compassion Funeral Services, 119-121 S. Stricker Street where the family will receive friends from 12 to 3 P.M. Mrs. Hall will lie in state at Isaiah Baptist Church, Monkton and Sheppard Road, on Friday from 6 to 9 P.M. On Saturday, services will be held at Isaiah Baptist Church, where the family will receive from 10:30 to 11 A.M., with services to follow. Inquiries to 410-566-5500.
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BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | August 18, 2011
Where the passengers on the tour bus rolling west on North Avenue saw blocks of crumbling and abandoned buildings and overgrown lots, Lou Fields envisioned another Pratt Street in the making. Fields, who heads a nonprofit heritage tourism group, is leading an effort to revitalize what he views as one of the city's most overlooked thoroughfares. Progress is possible, he says, even in tough economic times. "Attention, awareness and appreciation — if you don't have those things going on, nothing's going to happen," said Fields, who views his role as that of "visionary crusader.
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FEATURES
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,SUN STAFF | February 10, 2000
Kati Kershaw, operations director and on-air personality at classical radio station WBJC-FM (91.5), has tried more than once to create a single signature style for herself. She just can't do it. Her life, her appearance, her personality is "definitely a study in contrasts," says Kershaw, 33. Just when "my colleagues at work think they have me pinned down, you can't really pin me down. No way. I really love it all." The product of an "eclectic household," where there was no television but plenty of classical and bluegrass music, Kershaw -- and her wardrobe -- reflects that multicultural background.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,chris.kaltenbach@baltsun.com | September 18, 2009
The Eastern Shore's second annual Chesapeake Film Festival kicks off at 8 tonight with Scott Teems' award-winning "That Evening Sun" (Teems, producer Laura Smith and cinematographer Rodney Taylor will all be in attendance) and ends with a 7 p.m. Sunday screening of the 1936 comedy "After the Thin Man." Other movies set for the weekend celebration of cinema include director Kimberly Peirce's 2008 "Stop-Loss," with Ryan Phillippe as an American soldier re-upped against his will for another tour in Iraq (12:30 p.m. Saturday, at the Academy Art Museum in Easton, with an appearance by screenwriter Mark Richard)
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | February 1, 1997
The genius of Woody Allen is amply displayed on TCM tonight."Groundhog Day" (8 p.m.-10 p.m., WMAR, Channel 2) -- Bill Murray brings an unexpectedly light (for him) touch to this comedy about a man destined to re-live the same day over and over and over again until he gets it right. And what does getting it right mean? That's what he has to find out. Murray's very funny, especially as the realization dawns that this sort of immortality isn't all it's cracked up to be. ABC."Dr. Quinn, Medicine Woman" (8 p.m.-9 p.m., WJZ, Channel 13)
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | July 24, 2009
The hero of (500) Days of Summer, Tom (Joseph Gordon-Levitt), works at a greeting-card company, where he's a whiz at creating slogans such as "I Love Us." He's given up on his professional dream of becoming an architect but not on his dream of finding true love - and he reckons he's lucked into it when his boss hires a comely, quizzical assistant named Summer (Zooey Deschanel). She likes Tom, she really likes him. But she doesn't believe in love at first sight, or even second or third sight.
NEWS
By Jay Carr and Jay Carr,BOSTON GLOBE | September 22, 1996
Just when we were getting used to the idea of Diane Keaton as a director, here she comes roaring back as an actress. Before the year ends, she'll be seen opposite Meryl Streep, Hume Cronyn and Robert De Niro in "Marvin's Room." But first, she gets mad -- then gets even -- as one of three discarded wives in "The First Wives Club," opposite Goldie Hawn and Bette Midler. The movie opened Friday.Well, maybe roaring back is putting it a little strongly. The word from the "First Wives Club" set was that if all three were served a bad meal, Hawn and Midler would send it back -- while Keaton would smile, eat it and get sick.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sam Sessa and Sam Sessa,Sun Reporter | October 5, 2006
Comedian, screenwriter and actor Michael Showalter likes coming to Baltimore for a couple of reasons. For one, he enjoys doing standup at the Ottobar. He's performed there three or four times, and is looking forward to coming back for another night of comedy with Michael Ian Black on Tuesday night. "It's just a really good venue," Showalter said. "All the comedians who've done shows there single it out. ... The way that the club is laid out, it's just a very intimate space. It's a very edgy, cool space."
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,chris.kaltenbach@baltsun.com | September 18, 2009
The Eastern Shore's second annual Chesapeake Film Festival kicks off at 8 tonight with Scott Teems' award-winning "That Evening Sun" (Teems, producer Laura Smith and cinematographer Rodney Taylor will all be in attendance) and ends with a 7 p.m. Sunday screening of the 1936 comedy "After the Thin Man." Other movies set for the weekend celebration of cinema include director Kimberly Peirce's 2008 "Stop-Loss," with Ryan Phillippe as an American soldier re-upped against his will for another tour in Iraq (12:30 p.m. Saturday, at the Academy Art Museum in Easton, with an appearance by screenwriter Mark Richard)
FEATURES
By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,SUN STAFF | March 25, 1996
I can't stand the suspense anymore. Let's rip open those envelopes."The Cosby Show" (7: 30 p.m.-8 p.m., WNUV, Channel 54) -- Cliff Huxtable (Bill Cosby) rounds up a bunch of his middle-aged friends (former NBA players Dave DeBusschere, Bill Bradley and Walt Hazard) to take on a team of young women on the basketball court."Barbara Walters Special" (8p.m.-9 p.m., WMAR, Channel 2) - As much an Oscar-night tradition as the Oscar, Ms. Walters' annual tri-fecta of movie star interviews includes Richard Dreyfuss, Oscar nominated for "Mr. Holland's Opus" and a previous winner for "The Goodbye Girl"; Annette Bening, once-nominated and married to the oft-nominated Warren Beatty; and the never-nominated Demi Moore, who shows Barbara how to do a striptease.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | July 24, 2009
The hero of (500) Days of Summer, Tom (Joseph Gordon-Levitt), works at a greeting-card company, where he's a whiz at creating slogans such as "I Love Us." He's given up on his professional dream of becoming an architect but not on his dream of finding true love - and he reckons he's lucked into it when his boss hires a comely, quizzical assistant named Summer (Zooey Deschanel). She likes Tom, she really likes him. But she doesn't believe in love at first sight, or even second or third sight.
NEWS
February 16, 2007
On February 10, 2007, ELIZABETH ANNIE HALL. On Friday, friends may call at Compassion Funeral Services, 119-121 S. Stricker Street where the family will receive friends from 12 to 3 P.M. Mrs. Hall will lie in state at Isaiah Baptist Church, Monkton and Sheppard Road, on Friday from 6 to 9 P.M. On Saturday, services will be held at Isaiah Baptist Church, where the family will receive from 10:30 to 11 A.M., with services to follow. Inquiries to 410-566-5500.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sam Sessa and Sam Sessa,Sun Reporter | October 5, 2006
Comedian, screenwriter and actor Michael Showalter likes coming to Baltimore for a couple of reasons. For one, he enjoys doing standup at the Ottobar. He's performed there three or four times, and is looking forward to coming back for another night of comedy with Michael Ian Black on Tuesday night. "It's just a really good venue," Showalter said. "All the comedians who've done shows there single it out. ... The way that the club is laid out, it's just a very intimate space. It's a very edgy, cool space."
FEATURES
By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | March 3, 2006
OSCAR NIGHT BALTIMORE -- Baltimoreans looking to watch Sunday night's Oscar ceremony in style should check out Oscar Night Baltimore, a motion picture academy-sanctioned event designed to raise money for charity and bring a little bit of Tinseltown glamour to cities throughout the United States. Festivities begin at 6:30 p.m. Sunday at the American Visionary Arts Museum's Jim Rouse Visionary Center, 800 Key Highway. The evening will feature live big-screen projection of the festivities, fine food and drink and a silent auction.
FEATURES
By MICHAEL SRAGOW | February 17, 2006
This year's roster of Oscar nominations has been hailed for introducing a new flock of talent to the Academy's ranks. But Oscar 2005 still looks a lot like Oscar 1975. Steven Spielberg's Munich has earned multiple nominations (including best director). Robert Altman will be getting an honorary Oscar for his body of work. Woody Allen has received a nomination for writing Match Point. In 1975, the Altman of M*A*S*H and McCabe and Mrs. Miller was the master gambler of American filmmaking.
NEWS
December 19, 2003
Annie May Hall Pinkett, a retired city public schools teacher and church deaconess, died Dec. 12 of congestive heart failure at Sinai Hospital. The Ashburton resident was 99. Born Annie May Hall in Columbia, S.C., she earned an education degree at Benedict College in Columbia and later attended Coppin State College, Hampton Institute, Morgan State University and New York University. She moved to Baltimore in 1928 and taught elementary subjects at East Baltimore schools, ending her career of 35 years at Gwynns Falls Elementary on Gwynns Falls Parkway.
FEATURES
By MICHAEL SRAGOW | February 17, 2006
This year's roster of Oscar nominations has been hailed for introducing a new flock of talent to the Academy's ranks. But Oscar 2005 still looks a lot like Oscar 1975. Steven Spielberg's Munich has earned multiple nominations (including best director). Robert Altman will be getting an honorary Oscar for his body of work. Woody Allen has received a nomination for writing Match Point. In 1975, the Altman of M*A*S*H and McCabe and Mrs. Miller was the master gambler of American filmmaking.
FEATURES
By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | March 3, 2006
OSCAR NIGHT BALTIMORE -- Baltimoreans looking to watch Sunday night's Oscar ceremony in style should check out Oscar Night Baltimore, a motion picture academy-sanctioned event designed to raise money for charity and bring a little bit of Tinseltown glamour to cities throughout the United States. Festivities begin at 6:30 p.m. Sunday at the American Visionary Arts Museum's Jim Rouse Visionary Center, 800 Key Highway. The evening will feature live big-screen projection of the festivities, fine food and drink and a silent auction.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | December 12, 2003
Sun Score 3-stars Jack Nicholson and Diane Keaton are so good in Something's Gotta Give, it's a shame writer-director Nancy Meyers couldn't rein herself in a little more. At 90 minutes, this would have been a top-of-the-line romantic comedy, cleverly written, wonderfully acted and marvelously paced. At two hours, it's still wonderfully acted - Keaton hasn't been this appealing since Annie Hall - but displays a dangerous tendency to drag. Had Meyers done away with some of the twists and turns crammed into the last half-hour, as well as an ending that strains both credulity and patience, she would have had a classic.
NEWS
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,Sun Staff | December 8, 2002
There's something about a woman in a tie that often has set hearts aflutter. There were Marlene Dietrich's androgynous suits and ties, which conveyed power and rebellion with a hint of domination. And, in the 1970s, there was the endearing Annie Hall (played by Diane Keaton), whose ties and mannish attire were part of her appeal. Recently, however, a different sort of siren in a tie has sprung up in fashion. She's sweet, she's playful and she wears her tie in ways women never have -- knotting it loosely over a tank top, T-shirt or ruffled blouse.
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