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By Dave Rosenthal | March 30, 2012
Baltimore author Anne Tyler granted a rare interview to NPR , and it was aired today -- giving fans a look at her writing life. (It also included a charming map and photographs that dovetail with her writing.) Tyler's novels often evoke scenes of Roland Park, where she lived for years. Her 20th, "The Beginner's Goodbye," scheduled for release Tuesday, also is set among the neighborhood's Victorian homes and leafy streets. It's described by publisher Random House as "a wise, haunting, and deeply moving new novel in which she explores how a middle-aged man, ripped apart by the death of his wife, is gradually restored by her frequent appearances - in their house, on the roadway, in the market.
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April 21, 2013
Local authors share the titles they're enjoying right now. Madison Smartt Bell, whose most recent novel is "The Color of Night": "Noble Savages," by Napoleon Chagnon, back to back with "Triste Tropiques" by Claude Levi-Strauss. Sort of a bookend pair of anthropology texts, both fascinating. "Les Cloches de la Bresilienne," a magical mystery by Haitian author Gary Victor. I have a project with some other people to publish this book in the U.S. Jessica Anya Blau, author of the forthcoming "The Wonder Bread Summer": I'm reading "Beautiful Ruins" by Jess Walter.
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By Dave Rosenthal | July 30, 2012
Sometimes the Amazon robots get a little wacky with their book recommendations for readers. The bots must get rusty from all of the rain out in Seattle. Read Street reader Eileen O'Brien recently got some weird suggestions for mysteries and thrillers, when the bots listed several books by Baltimore novelist Anne Tyler. Among them: "Breathing Lessons" and "Dinner at the Homesick Restaurant. " Maybe the bots confused Tyler's "The Beginner's Goodbye" with Raymond Chandler's "The Long Goodbye," but I'm flummoxed about the others.
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By Dave Rosenthal | July 30, 2012
Sometimes the Amazon robots get a little wacky with their book recommendations for readers. The bots must get rusty from all of the rain out in Seattle. Read Street reader Eileen O'Brien recently got some weird suggestions for mysteries and thrillers, when the bots listed several books by Baltimore novelist Anne Tyler. Among them: "Breathing Lessons" and "Dinner at the Homesick Restaurant. " Maybe the bots confused Tyler's "The Beginner's Goodbye" with Raymond Chandler's "The Long Goodbye," but I'm flummoxed about the others.
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By Mary Carole McCauley | mary.mccauley@baltsun.com | January 5, 2010
You don't so much read a book by Anne Tyler as you read through it. Her 18th novel, "Noah's Compass" hits bookstores today, and like its predecessors, it is masterful at exposing the mental evasions and compromises that underlie daily conversation. The author delves beneath the "what" "where" and "when" of even the most seemingly banal utterances to reveal half-articulated wishes and resentments, withdrawals and reconciliations. The main character in "Noah's Compass" is a retired schoolteacher named Liam Pennywell, who looks back at a life that has been under-lived.
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By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | March 30, 2011
Baltimore novelist Anne Tyler has been named a finalist for the 2011 Man Booker International Prize, a biennial literary award that carries with it a cash prize of more than $96,000. Tyler, 69, is one of 13 finalists for the prize, which is awarded every other year by the Australia-based Man Group. The prize of 60,000 British pounds is given for an author's body of work and continuing contributions to world fiction. Others on this year's nominees' list include Americans Marilynne Robinson and Philip Roth.
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By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | March 30, 2012
With her 20th novel, "The Beginner's Goodbye," about to be released, Baltimore novelist Anne Tyler is already hard at work on her 21st — a "sprawling family saga that goes on and on and on" that she'll be writing backward, beginning with the ending. That way, Tyler explained in an interview broadcast on NPR on Friday morning, should she die before the book is finished, it could still be published. "Backwards, nobody would ever know whether you had reached the end you had planned," she told NPR's Lynn Neary.
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By Beth Kephart and Beth Kephart,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 6, 2001
"Back When We Were Grownups," by Anne Tyler. Alfred A. Knopf. 274 pages. $25. "People have always seemed funny and strange to me, and touching in unexpected ways," Anne Tyler wrote in the marvelous essay "Still Just Writing," some 20 years ago. "I can't shake off a sort of mist of irony that hangs over whatever I see. And I'm always hurt when a reader says that I choose only bizarre or eccentric people to write about. It's not a matter of choice; it just seems to me that even the most ordinary person, in real life, will turn out to have something unusual at his center."
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By Martha Southgate and Martha Southgate,Special to the Sun | January 4, 2004
The Amateur Marriage, by Anne Tyler. Knopf. 306 pages. $24.95. When you open an Anne Tyler novel, you know that you are putting yourself into the strong and seasoned hands of a Pulitzer Prize-winning professional. Since 1964, Tyler has written 16 novels, the majority of them set in Baltimore, where she has lived for many years. Her love for and knowledge of her adopted hometown are obvious, her affection for her characters palpable and her skill and charm as a writer undeniable. In fact, the only quibble one can have with her new novel, The Amateur Marriage, is that maybe it goes down a little too easy, carries a gleam that's a little too bright.
NEWS
By James H. Bready and James H. Bready,Special to The Sun | April 30, 1995
The unwritten compact is: Anne Tyler writes novel after novel with today's Baltimore as its setting; Baltimore, for its part, leaves her alone. This arrangement has been in effect for a dozen books (her first two were written elsewhere) and 28 years.Along the way, Ms. Tyler has acquired a national following, won a Pulitzer Prize for "Breathing Lessons," seen "The Accidental Tourist" become a three-star movie and, of equal importance, done her full share alongside her physician husband in the raising of two daughters.
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By Dave Rosenthal | March 30, 2012
Baltimore author Anne Tyler granted a rare interview to NPR , and it was aired today -- giving fans a look at her writing life. (It also included a charming map and photographs that dovetail with her writing.) Tyler's novels often evoke scenes of Roland Park, where she lived for years. Her 20th, "The Beginner's Goodbye," scheduled for release Tuesday, also is set among the neighborhood's Victorian homes and leafy streets. It's described by publisher Random House as "a wise, haunting, and deeply moving new novel in which she explores how a middle-aged man, ripped apart by the death of his wife, is gradually restored by her frequent appearances - in their house, on the roadway, in the market.
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By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | March 30, 2012
With her 20th novel, "The Beginner's Goodbye," about to be released, Baltimore novelist Anne Tyler is already hard at work on her 21st — a "sprawling family saga that goes on and on and on" that she'll be writing backward, beginning with the ending. That way, Tyler explained in an interview broadcast on NPR on Friday morning, should she die before the book is finished, it could still be published. "Backwards, nobody would ever know whether you had reached the end you had planned," she told NPR's Lynn Neary.
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By Michael Sragow, The Baltimore Sun | April 1, 2011
Writer-director Tom McCarthy says that when he began working on "Win Win," the hook for him was high-school wrestling. "I thought — 'Wow! What an interesting thing to explore.' I wondered, if I was to expand from there with a story, where would it lead?" McCarthy didn't want to make another rah-rah sports film. Barack Obama had just been elected president. Everywhere people were speaking about restoring the American Dream. "We were hearing a lot about the middle class," McCarthy says.
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By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | March 30, 2011
Baltimore novelist Anne Tyler has been named a finalist for the 2011 Man Booker International Prize, a biennial literary award that carries with it a cash prize of more than $96,000. Tyler, 69, is one of 13 finalists for the prize, which is awarded every other year by the Australia-based Man Group. The prize of 60,000 British pounds is given for an author's body of work and continuing contributions to world fiction. Others on this year's nominees' list include Americans Marilynne Robinson and Philip Roth.
FEATURES
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,mary.mccauley@baltsun.com | January 5, 2010
You don't so much read a book by Anne Tyler as you read through it. Her 18th novel, "Noah's Compass" hits bookstores today, and like its predecessors, it is masterful at exposing the mental evasions and compromises that underlie daily conversation. The author delves beneath the "what" "where" and "when" of even the most seemingly banal utterances to reveal half-articulated wishes and resentments, withdrawals and reconciliations. The main character in "Noah's Compass" is a retired schoolteacher named Liam Pennywell, who looks back at a life that has been under-lived.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley | mary.mccauley@baltsun.com | January 5, 2010
You don't so much read a book by Anne Tyler as you read through it. Her 18th novel, "Noah's Compass" hits bookstores today, and like its predecessors, it is masterful at exposing the mental evasions and compromises that underlie daily conversation. The author delves beneath the "what" "where" and "when" of even the most seemingly banal utterances to reveal half-articulated wishes and resentments, withdrawals and reconciliations. The main character in "Noah's Compass" is a retired schoolteacher named Liam Pennywell, who looks back at a life that has been under-lived.
NEWS
By Stephen Margulies and Stephen Margulies,Special to The Sun | April 23, 1995
"Ladder of Years," by Anne Tyler. 325 pages. New York: Alfred A. Knopf. $24"Ladder of Years" is Ms. Tyler's 13th novel. It is not as ambitiously tragic as "Dinner at the Homesick Restaurant," which clinched Ms. Tyler's fame. Neither is it as exhilaratingly readable as "The Accidental Tourist," which was made into a movie almost pleasing as the book. But, for the most part, "Ladder of Years" is a "page-turner" in the best sense.One wants to lightly caress the pages of the story because one cares for Ms. Tyler's touchingly flawed characters, for her forgiving way of looking at Baltimore, at human fate, at family love and family failure to love.
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By SYLVIA BADGER | June 2, 1995
The Mount Washington Octagon is the showpiece of the USF&G corporation, with its pink brick exterior, gingerbread verandas, and lovely interior. It was the setting for a party to honor Susan Gauvey, chairman of the Marion House Board and one of its most treasured volunteers. The Octagon was built in 1855 as a girl's finishing school and until USF&G bought the complex in 1982, it always housed young women -- even the director of Marion House, Sister Augusta Reilly, lived there when it was the home to novice Sisters of Mercy.
NEWS
August 28, 2008
Rosalie Anne Tyler A memorial service in her honor will be held at the Maple View Baptist Church, 1600 Singer Road, Joppa, Md. 21085 on Saturday, August 30 at 11:00A.M. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions can be made to the Upper Chesapeake Hospital Foundation Pulmonary Program, 500 Upper Chesapeake Drive, Bel Air, MD., 21014
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By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,Sun reporter | March 3, 2008
Gazing out the window in what once was Anne Tyler's writing room - the second-floor room next to the master bedroom and a small enclosed porch - it's easy to imagine her characters on the lawn below, beckoning her to follow. There's Jeremy Pauling, the painfully shy collage artist from Celestial Navigation. He's gathered all his courage and is waiting on the sidewalk outside the handsome French Country house built in 1933 at 222 Tunbridge Road, blinking in the sunlight. Standing next to him is Macon Leary from The Accidental Tourist.
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