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Anne Morrow Lindbergh

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By Anthony Scaduto and Anthony Scaduto,Newsday | January 9, 1994
Bruno Richard Hauptmann could hardly have foreseen how prophetic his close-to-final words would become when he uttered them on the night of April 3, 1936, shortly before being escorted to the electric chair in the New Jersey State Prison at Trenton.Hauptmann, in the oddly syntaxed and sometimes poetic way he had of speaking, told his minister, "They think when I die, the case will die. They think it will be like a book I closed. But the book, it will never close."More than a half century later, the book in the Lindbergh kidnapping case remains open.
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By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | June 20, 2013
Memories of the 1933 kidnapping in Baltimore of Albert Hendler, scion of the wealthy and prominent Hendler Creamery Co. family, have recently been revived in an exhibition of documents relating to the case at the Crime Museum in Washington. The nation was still jittery after the shocking nighttime kidnapping a year earlier of Charles A. Lindbergh Jr., son of aviartion hero Charles A. Lindbergh Sr. and Anne Morrow Lindbergh, from the crib of his home near Hopewell, N.J. Hendler was the son of Lionel Manuel Hendler, the founder in 1905 of the Hendler Creamery Co. in the 1100 block of E. Baltimore St. Early in 1929, the elder Hendler, who was a philanthropist, had sold his company to Borden's for 79,000 shares of Borden's stock in a deal that was estimated at the time to be worth $6 million.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | February 15, 2001
A musical retelling of Lindbergh ordeal Anne Morrow Lindbergh's death last week brought the 1932 kidnapping and murder of her infant son, Charles Lindbergh Jr., back into the news. And a new musical about that event, "Lindbergh Baby Kidnapped," will make its world premiere at the Theatre Project tomorrow. Written by New York composer, lyricist and librettist Kenneth Allen Vega, the multimedia musical features a cast of nine re-enacting events ranging from the 1932 kidnapping to the 1936 execution of convicted kidnapper Bruno Richard Hauptmann.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,special to the sun | April 30, 2008
In Colonial Players' current offering of the play Hauptmann, a case can be made to find the Annapolis troupe guilty of producing riveting courtroom drama. Set in 1936, the year of Bruno Hauptmann's execution after being tried and found guilty of the kidnapping and killing of the 20-month-old infant son of American hero Charles Lindbergh and his wife Anne Morrow Lindbergh, Hauptmann presents a fair-minded account of the actual proceedings while capturing the sensationalism, prejudices and celebrity worship of the era. In the program notes, Colonial Players director Beth Terranova writes that "Hauptmann's trial triggered the mass media age in trial coverage because of the nature of the crime and the accessibility of information surrounding the case."
NEWS
By Tillie Friedenberg | January 3, 1995
Must I love? Is there no other way?% Anne Morrow Lindbergh(Her heart clicked offwhen she saw the bones,so small, so white,her son, stolen,buried in the woodswhere she ran screamingfrom tree to tree;and the trees, in pity,let go their leaves.Emerging from woods,blood sludged with sorrow,she flew to an islandwhere no bird sings,tried to climb higherthan pain could fly.While thorny hedges closed herin, grief seeped slowlyfrom her veins.Awake,she turned her mirrors from thewall. She would re-enter the sky,steer a course somewherebelow the stars,above the geese honking north,head for home.
NEWS
By Ann Egerton | February 28, 1993
A GIFT FOR LIFE: ANNE MORROW LINDBERGH. Dorothy Herrmann. Ticknor & Fields. 325 pages. $24.95. Anne Morrow Lindbergh was both an old-fashioned girl and a woman ahead of her time.She wrestled with the conflict between her instinct and training to be a devoted wife and mother and her need to write and forge her own identity. The daughter of a powerful banker, diplomat and U.S. senator and of a vivacious, self-confident mother, she married the internationally famous aviator Charles A. Lindbergh, the first man to fly across the Atlantic alone.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,special to the sun | April 30, 2008
In Colonial Players' current offering of the play Hauptmann, a case can be made to find the Annapolis troupe guilty of producing riveting courtroom drama. Set in 1936, the year of Bruno Hauptmann's execution after being tried and found guilty of the kidnapping and killing of the 20-month-old infant son of American hero Charles Lindbergh and his wife Anne Morrow Lindbergh, Hauptmann presents a fair-minded account of the actual proceedings while capturing the sensationalism, prejudices and celebrity worship of the era. In the program notes, Colonial Players director Beth Terranova writes that "Hauptmann's trial triggered the mass media age in trial coverage because of the nature of the crime and the accessibility of information surrounding the case."
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | February 17, 2001
Just about anything can be the subject of a musical - presidential assassins, Siamese twins, brain tumors. So a musical about the 1932 kidnapping of the Lindbergh baby isn't as bizarre as it might seem. Composer/librettist Kenneth Allan Vega's "Lindbergh Baby Kidnapped" (receiving its world premiere at the Theatre Project) has been stylishly and inventively staged by director Scott Susong, whose production incorporates film, puppetry and a trio of koken, the onstage assistants used in Japanese theater.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | June 20, 2013
Memories of the 1933 kidnapping in Baltimore of Albert Hendler, scion of the wealthy and prominent Hendler Creamery Co. family, have recently been revived in an exhibition of documents relating to the case at the Crime Museum in Washington. The nation was still jittery after the shocking nighttime kidnapping a year earlier of Charles A. Lindbergh Jr., son of aviartion hero Charles A. Lindbergh Sr. and Anne Morrow Lindbergh, from the crib of his home near Hopewell, N.J. Hendler was the son of Lionel Manuel Hendler, the founder in 1905 of the Hendler Creamery Co. in the 1100 block of E. Baltimore St. Early in 1929, the elder Hendler, who was a philanthropist, had sold his company to Borden's for 79,000 shares of Borden's stock in a deal that was estimated at the time to be worth $6 million.
NEWS
December 7, 1997
Anne Morrow Lindbergh (1906 - )was married to American aviator Charles Lindbergh, who in 1927 made the historic first solo flight across the Atlantic. She has written two memoirs of flying with her husband, "North to the Orient" and "Listen! The Wind," two books of poetry and a popular book of essays on women's themes, "Gift from the Sea." The Lindberghs' life was shadowed by the tragic kidnapping and death of their infant son. Sensitive and introverted, Anne Lindbergh wrote in her diaries about the effort to reconcile the demands of being a wife and mother much in the public eye with her own needs as a writer.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | February 17, 2001
Just about anything can be the subject of a musical - presidential assassins, Siamese twins, brain tumors. So a musical about the 1932 kidnapping of the Lindbergh baby isn't as bizarre as it might seem. Composer/librettist Kenneth Allan Vega's "Lindbergh Baby Kidnapped" (receiving its world premiere at the Theatre Project) has been stylishly and inventively staged by director Scott Susong, whose production incorporates film, puppetry and a trio of koken, the onstage assistants used in Japanese theater.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | February 15, 2001
A musical retelling of Lindbergh ordeal Anne Morrow Lindbergh's death last week brought the 1932 kidnapping and murder of her infant son, Charles Lindbergh Jr., back into the news. And a new musical about that event, "Lindbergh Baby Kidnapped," will make its world premiere at the Theatre Project tomorrow. Written by New York composer, lyricist and librettist Kenneth Allen Vega, the multimedia musical features a cast of nine re-enacting events ranging from the 1932 kidnapping to the 1936 execution of convicted kidnapper Bruno Richard Hauptmann.
NEWS
By Tillie Friedenberg | January 3, 1995
Must I love? Is there no other way?% Anne Morrow Lindbergh(Her heart clicked offwhen she saw the bones,so small, so white,her son, stolen,buried in the woodswhere she ran screamingfrom tree to tree;and the trees, in pity,let go their leaves.Emerging from woods,blood sludged with sorrow,she flew to an islandwhere no bird sings,tried to climb higherthan pain could fly.While thorny hedges closed herin, grief seeped slowlyfrom her veins.Awake,she turned her mirrors from thewall. She would re-enter the sky,steer a course somewherebelow the stars,above the geese honking north,head for home.
FEATURES
By Anthony Scaduto and Anthony Scaduto,Newsday | January 9, 1994
Bruno Richard Hauptmann could hardly have foreseen how prophetic his close-to-final words would become when he uttered them on the night of April 3, 1936, shortly before being escorted to the electric chair in the New Jersey State Prison at Trenton.Hauptmann, in the oddly syntaxed and sometimes poetic way he had of speaking, told his minister, "They think when I die, the case will die. They think it will be like a book I closed. But the book, it will never close."More than a half century later, the book in the Lindbergh kidnapping case remains open.
NEWS
By Ann Egerton | February 28, 1993
A GIFT FOR LIFE: ANNE MORROW LINDBERGH. Dorothy Herrmann. Ticknor & Fields. 325 pages. $24.95. Anne Morrow Lindbergh was both an old-fashioned girl and a woman ahead of her time.She wrestled with the conflict between her instinct and training to be a devoted wife and mother and her need to write and forge her own identity. The daughter of a powerful banker, diplomat and U.S. senator and of a vivacious, self-confident mother, she married the internationally famous aviator Charles A. Lindbergh, the first man to fly across the Atlantic alone.
NEWS
March 29, 1995
Hanns-Joachim Friedrichs, 68, a foreign correspondent and television anchorman whose lively reports helped transform German television news, died of cancer yesterday in Hamburg. He anchored ARD's late-evening news program, "Tagesthemen," from 1985 to 1991, helping to transform German television news from the static reading of scripts to an American-style format, featuring live correspondent reports and a more engaged news presentation. For 20 years, he was a foreign correspondent for ZDF, the other leading German public television network, including two long stints in the United States and covering Vietnam from 1972 to 1973.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | December 14, 1993
Samuel M. Stayman, 84, whose name is known to millions of bridge players throughout the world because of the Stayman Convention, a form of inquiry in bidding, died Saturday of cancer at his home in Palm Beach, Fla.He was considered one of the world's greatest bridge players and was also a leading bridge administrator, serving as treasurer of the American Contract Bridge League, and later as a trustee of its Charity Foundation.But he was best known for the Stayman Convention, a two-club bid in response to one no-trump to ask for a major suit, which is used almost universally.
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