Advertisement
HomeCollectionsAnne Lamott
IN THE NEWS

Anne Lamott

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
Susan Reimer | July 28, 2010
Any mom worth her carpool car keys will recognize Elizabeth, the fraught and embattled mother in Anne Lamott's new book, "Imperfect Birds. " Every siren sends her imagination flying to the place on the road where she is certain her teen-age daughter, Rosie, lies bleeding. Every exchange with Rosie is likely to flare like a match and burn them both. And every mother whose heart has been wrung out like a dish rag by a daughter will recognize Rosie, a smart, athletic, beautiful lying machine on the cusp of college.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
Susan Reimer | July 28, 2010
Any mom worth her carpool car keys will recognize Elizabeth, the fraught and embattled mother in Anne Lamott's new book, "Imperfect Birds. " Every siren sends her imagination flying to the place on the road where she is certain her teen-age daughter, Rosie, lies bleeding. Every exchange with Rosie is likely to flare like a match and burn them both. And every mother whose heart has been wrung out like a dish rag by a daughter will recognize Rosie, a smart, athletic, beautiful lying machine on the cusp of college.
Advertisement
FEATURES
By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,SUN STAFF | February 15, 1999
Anne Lamott understands. Mayer Baker kneels before her, the first supplicant in a line of more than 100, a line that stretches from literature, through genre fiction and all the way to biography in the Pikesville Bibelot bookstore. Baker has with her seven copies of various Lamott titles, including four of the latest one, "Traveling Mercies," a book of essays billed as "some thoughts on faith." It's also about hair and dogs and parents and how screaming at one's child is akin to "bitch-slapping E.T.," a characteristic Lamott-ism.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Victoria A. Brownworth and By Victoria A. Brownworth,Special to the Sun | September 29, 2002
Blue Shoe, by Anne Lamott. Riverhead Books. 304 pages. $24.95. Blue Shoe marks Anne Lamott's return to fiction after a long hiatus, during which her well-received series of memoirs (Traveling Mercies, Bird by Bird, Operating Instructions) garnered her a hearty audience. Drawing on topics she addressed in those memoirs -- family, alcoholism, faith -- in Blue Shoe Lamott crafts a tale in which many women will find themselves. Mattie Ryder is pushing 40 hard, pushing against her size 12 waistline, pushing through each day as a newly divorced mother of two unhappy young children, Harry and Ella, trying to make ends meet in every sense of the term and failing miserably.
NEWS
By Ann Egerton | June 27, 1993
OPERATING INSTRUCTIONS:A JOURNAL OF MY SON'SFIRST YEAR.Anne Lamott.Pantheon.251 pages. $21.One might not expect that a chronicle of the first year of a single, 35-year-old mother's baby would be full of laughs or inspiration, especially since the mother is both a recovering alcoholic and recovering drug addict, and broke "like the Joads." But it is; "Operating Instructions" is funny and sad and wise and brave and more.The skeleton of the plot is discouraging. Prospective father bolts at the news; mother's track record of substance abuse until recently is grim; her career as a novelist and magazine article writer has brought a Guggenheim Fellowship but no regular income.
NEWS
September 5, 2002
An interview with Lita Schabra Parke, founder of the Breakfast Club book club. Why do you call yourselves "the Breakfast Club"? We're actually looking for a new name, but we met for the first time in July for breakfast - [at] Bob Evans - but because of the makeup of the group we have been moving the time around to meet everyone's schedule, and now we meet in the evening. How did you get started? Was there some spark? I read a book called Honey for a Woman's Heart by Gladys Hunt, and that book spurred me to take action.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Victoria A. Brownworth and By Victoria A. Brownworth,Special to the Sun | September 29, 2002
Blue Shoe, by Anne Lamott. Riverhead Books. 304 pages. $24.95. Blue Shoe marks Anne Lamott's return to fiction after a long hiatus, during which her well-received series of memoirs (Traveling Mercies, Bird by Bird, Operating Instructions) garnered her a hearty audience. Drawing on topics she addressed in those memoirs -- family, alcoholism, faith -- in Blue Shoe Lamott crafts a tale in which many women will find themselves. Mattie Ryder is pushing 40 hard, pushing against her size 12 waistline, pushing through each day as a newly divorced mother of two unhappy young children, Harry and Ella, trying to make ends meet in every sense of the term and failing miserably.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 16, 2001
John Waters: Ivy Compton Burnett's novels always make me laugh, but she's difficult to recommend. "My books are hard not to put down," she once quipped to a journalist. But try Darkness and Day (1951); her use of language here is so stylized, peculiar and vicious that I had to call up friends to read them the dialogue out loud. John Waters has written and directed 12 films, beginning in 1969 with Mondo Trasho. His most recent movie is Cecil B. Demented, and he is currently writing his new screenplay, A Dirty Shame.
NEWS
By Ann Egerton | October 23, 1994
In 1935, Cornell professor William Strunk Jr. gave us "The Elements of Style," a little book on how to write clear English prose. In 1959, E. B. White added an introduction and some gentle revising, and over the years, the book has come to be known to students and writers as simply "Strunk and White."Now, writer (and former Goucher student) Anne Lamott has produced a longer, more free-form guide and thrown in some advice on living, which also often applies to writing. Add James J. Kilpatrick's pungent essays on the subject, and you have a meaty contemporary American collection.
NEWS
By Michael Saunders and Michael Saunders,BOSTON GLOBE | July 14, 1996
There was a time when electronic magazines and newsletters meandered around the Internet without much attention.It was a publishing medium ignored by the rest of the world until given commercial viability by PC proliferation and the multimedia-friendly World Wide Web. (Money can't buy you love, but it can certainly buy market penetration.)The people with answers said all this nascent field needed was the credibility of a major player, a corporate force that would suck additional business behind it the way a speeding semitrailer pulls trash into its airstream.
NEWS
September 5, 2002
An interview with Lita Schabra Parke, founder of the Breakfast Club book club. Why do you call yourselves "the Breakfast Club"? We're actually looking for a new name, but we met for the first time in July for breakfast - [at] Bob Evans - but because of the makeup of the group we have been moving the time around to meet everyone's schedule, and now we meet in the evening. How did you get started? Was there some spark? I read a book called Honey for a Woman's Heart by Gladys Hunt, and that book spurred me to take action.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 16, 2001
John Waters: Ivy Compton Burnett's novels always make me laugh, but she's difficult to recommend. "My books are hard not to put down," she once quipped to a journalist. But try Darkness and Day (1951); her use of language here is so stylized, peculiar and vicious that I had to call up friends to read them the dialogue out loud. John Waters has written and directed 12 films, beginning in 1969 with Mondo Trasho. His most recent movie is Cecil B. Demented, and he is currently writing his new screenplay, A Dirty Shame.
FEATURES
By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,SUN STAFF | February 15, 1999
Anne Lamott understands. Mayer Baker kneels before her, the first supplicant in a line of more than 100, a line that stretches from literature, through genre fiction and all the way to biography in the Pikesville Bibelot bookstore. Baker has with her seven copies of various Lamott titles, including four of the latest one, "Traveling Mercies," a book of essays billed as "some thoughts on faith." It's also about hair and dogs and parents and how screaming at one's child is akin to "bitch-slapping E.T.," a characteristic Lamott-ism.
NEWS
By Ann Egerton | June 27, 1993
OPERATING INSTRUCTIONS:A JOURNAL OF MY SON'SFIRST YEAR.Anne Lamott.Pantheon.251 pages. $21.One might not expect that a chronicle of the first year of a single, 35-year-old mother's baby would be full of laughs or inspiration, especially since the mother is both a recovering alcoholic and recovering drug addict, and broke "like the Joads." But it is; "Operating Instructions" is funny and sad and wise and brave and more.The skeleton of the plot is discouraging. Prospective father bolts at the news; mother's track record of substance abuse until recently is grim; her career as a novelist and magazine article writer has brought a Guggenheim Fellowship but no regular income.
NEWS
By ELLEN GOODMAN | July 7, 1995
Boston -- These are days when even the people who pose for PowerBook ads don't want to take their laptop to the beach. Or travel the Internet in their hammock.It's high summer and what everyone needs isn't a home page, but a page-turner. The best way to give your mind a workout while your body gets a rest is to indulge in that wonderfully non-aerobic exercise called summer reading.So in this spirit, I perform my annual public service for readers who might otherwise be seduced into finally buying ''The Bridges of Madison County,'' thereby keeping it on the best-seller list for yet another -- 153rd (!
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | May 26, 2005
BOSTON - I never did figure out the meaning of the phrase "summer reading." Since when did reading come in and out of season like, say, strawberries? Do some books only ripen with enough sunshine? Are there others that need a soupM-gon of sand to turn the pages? Despite these reservations, we here at Book Central have gotten our annual list together even before the asparagus have raised their heads out of bed. Yes, the summer top fare is already predetermined. The latest Harry Potter saga is No. 1 on the Amazon book list and it won't even be released till mid-July.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.