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By New York Times News Service | December 22, 1994
Anne Klein & Co. and its designer, Richard Tyler, said Monday that they were ending their relationship after only 19 months.Mr. Tyler signed on with Anne Klein to design clothes that were less expensive than the signature $2,000 jackets that he produced for his own line in California. Anne Klein had been tired of seeing Calvin Klein and Donna Karan get all the publicity, and had wanted a hipper image.Now, Anne Klein appears to be running back to the cover of the cost-conscious practical sportswear image that the designer whose name is on the door made famous before her death in 1974.
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By SLOANE BROWN and SLOANE BROWN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 15, 2008
When friends Jan and John Braun invite you to a casual little cocktail party at their house, what do you wear? Especially when their house has been turned into the Baltimore Symphony Decorator Show House? For fellow Ruxtonite, Amy Lewis, it's black and white. Literally. This 48-year-old stay-at-home mom always gussies up a bit, and black and white is one of her favorite ways to go. Amy Lewis Age: 48 Residence: Ruxton Job: Community volunteer Self-described style: "Classic, but fun" The Look: Black and white Anne Klein cotton pique coat.
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By Mary Gottschalk and Mary Gottschalk,Knight-Ridder News Service | August 13, 1992
San Francisco -- Louis Dell'Olio, the designer behind the Anne Klein labels and licensees, breezed through the San Francisco Bay Area recently, stopping at Saks Fifth Avenue and showing his fall collection at a luncheon benefiting the American Diabetes Society. He paused long enough to share his thoughts on fashion in general and fall '92 in particular:Q: What do women want from fashion?A: "It's simple. Women want to look good. They want clothes to last more than a season, and they want versatility, comfort -- and they want to look good.
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By Dan Rodricks | February 18, 2002
ANNE KLEIN'S father, a cabinetmaker named Yale Klein, formerly Y. Kulishzewski of Czarist Russia and known to his immigrant friends in South Baltimore as Joseph, bought an 87-year-old building on South Charles Street in 1927, moved his wife and four children into the top two stories and turned the first floor into a hardware store. His mortgage payments were $7.50 every two weeks, payable to the Bevan Street Permanent Building Association. Opening a hardware store in what is now called Federal Hill was a smart move.
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By Vida Roberts and Vida Roberts,Staff Writer | June 24, 1993
New YorkRichard Tyler, designer to a galaxy of Hollywood's million-dollar luminaries, is turning his talents to designing for America's working woman.The man who has made frock coats and frocks for Julia Roberts, Kathleen Turner, Anjelica Huston, Susan Sarandon, Diana Ross, Oprah, Cher, Madonna and Prince is entering the mainstream.Who is Richard Tyler? He's a 44-year-old Los Angeles-based Australian designer of luxurious, couture-quality clothes-to-die-for, and he took New York by storm in April when he showed his first major fall collection under his own name.
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By Amy M. Spindler and Amy M. Spindler,New York Times News Service | May 13, 1993
There is no more dramatic sign of the changing point of view of American sportswear than Richard Tyler's being named last week to replace Louis Dell'Olio as the designer at Anne Klein & Co.While both are the same age -- 44 -- Mr. Tyler is a West Coast designer, tanned and with wavy rock-star hair, and has developed a young Hollywood clientele. Mr. Dell'Olio is a child of Seventh Avenue, beginning his career at 24 at Anne Klein, working alongside Donna Karan until she left to start her own house.
FEATURES
By N.Y. Times News Service | July 10, 1991
We have seen the future, and it is zippers.Expect zippers to appear all over when cool-weather clothes hit the stores. And even though some fashion naysayers believe that zippers don't sell, you can bet your last dollar they will be as embraced next season as color-blocked clothes were for spring. The newness of trimming plus the instant fashion "in" of the look make it a sure thing.Donna Karan is credited with starting this trend in her spring collection, which featured zipfront blazers, scuba dresses and skirts.
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By Edited by Holly Selby and Edited by Holly Selby,New York Times News Service Zipperee do-da Knight-Ridder News ServiceLos Angeles Daily News | July 11, 1991
Pointing a finger at fashionThis is one of those fashion innovations you probably never thought of or could imagine anyone else ever thinking of: a golf glove designed with women in mind, women with long fingernails.Called the Lady Classic, the glove has open-ended fingertips to enable those painted marvels to protrude a bit.Saves wear and tear. It can be bought at golf shops or ordered from Pocketec, a manufacturer of golfing equipment, from (800) 669-5239.We have seen the future, and it is zippers.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | February 18, 2002
ANNE KLEIN'S father, a cabinetmaker named Yale Klein, formerly Y. Kulishzewski of Czarist Russia and known to his immigrant friends in South Baltimore as Joseph, bought an 87-year-old building on South Charles Street in 1927, moved his wife and four children into the top two stories and turned the first floor into a hardware store. His mortgage payments were $7.50 every two weeks, payable to the Bevan Street Permanent Building Association. Opening a hardware store in what is now called Federal Hill was a smart move.
FEATURES
By Vida Roberts and Vida Roberts,Sun Fashion Editor | November 2, 1994
Designers at the New York spring collections are showing visible panty lines. It's all part of fashion's backward movement of the moment. Last year it was thongs and G-strings, but having exposed supermodel backsides to the glare of paparazzi flash, the fashion-jaded are looking elsewhere for excitement.It's to the '50s and your mother's underwear, when respectable girls had never even heard of bikinis and their bottoms were all covered up by drawers with cute lolly and spanky names.That's the new contour, the new hot pants are rounded to cut in at the thigh.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | February 4, 2002
Viiu Ann Vellisto Klein, a native of Estonia and a laboratory technician at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine since 1975, died Monday of cancer at her home in Perry Hall. She was 66. "We had a surprise party for her last year, and people came from all over the world," said Dr. Paul T. Englund, who heads the Hopkins lab where she worked studying the biochemistry of parasitic protozoa. Mrs. Klein's role went beyond conducting experiments, and she befriended graduate students studying to become scientists.
FEATURES
By Mary Corey and Mary Corey,SUN STAFF | July 19, 1998
Thoroughly modern bridesToo often, bridal magazines look like catalogs and read like Miss Manners.Stacy Morrison, Modern Bride's new editor-in-chief, hopes to change that.Since taking over, she's set out to make the magazine live up to its name - and her efforts show in the August/September issue on newsstands now.She's added new features including personal essays called Voices. She's created a friendly, welcoming tone. And she's devoted more pages to style and beauty."The bridal fantasy doesn't have to be so offputting," she says.
FEATURES
By VIDA ROBERTS | November 9, 1995
ANNA SUIIt's OK to watch the masters, but keeping up with the kids keeps the industry on its toes. Anna Sui is one designer who can take the goofiest downtown look and turn it into a saleable line. She's wise beyond her years.This year, she went to the Wee Kirk in the Vale rectory jumble sale and updated the old WASPY castoffs -- madras bermudas, McMullen linen shifts, Villager blouses and chino separates. She even enlarged and twisted some Pucci prints into a hip new shapes. She pumped up the colors and the patterns and yo!
FEATURES
By New York Times News Service | December 22, 1994
Anne Klein & Co. and its designer, Richard Tyler, said Monday that they were ending their relationship after only 19 months.Mr. Tyler signed on with Anne Klein to design clothes that were less expensive than the signature $2,000 jackets that he produced for his own line in California. Anne Klein had been tired of seeing Calvin Klein and Donna Karan get all the publicity, and had wanted a hipper image.Now, Anne Klein appears to be running back to the cover of the cost-conscious practical sportswear image that the designer whose name is on the door made famous before her death in 1974.
FEATURES
By Vida Roberts and Vida Roberts,Sun Fashion Editor | November 2, 1994
Designers at the New York spring collections are showing visible panty lines. It's all part of fashion's backward movement of the moment. Last year it was thongs and G-strings, but having exposed supermodel backsides to the glare of paparazzi flash, the fashion-jaded are looking elsewhere for excitement.It's to the '50s and your mother's underwear, when respectable girls had never even heard of bikinis and their bottoms were all covered up by drawers with cute lolly and spanky names.That's the new contour, the new hot pants are rounded to cut in at the thigh.
FEATURES
By Mary Corey and Mary Corey,Sun Staff Writer | October 13, 1994
Packing for a month-long trip is challenging enough, but imagine if you needed to take along half a dozen evening gowns and a musical instrument. When violinist Mari Matsumoto heads to her native Japan with the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra next week, she'll be taking those, plus an assortment of casual and dressy clothes.To help select what goes in her suitcase, Ms. Matsumoto has turned to her teen-age son Kenneth for fashion advice. Her husband Bruce Moore has his own packing to do since he plays the horn with the BSO."
FEATURES
By Sujata Banerjee and Sujata Banerjee,Evening Sun Staff | November 7, 1990
DRESS TO IMPRESS. Are women more likely to spend money on one designer piece than buying separates? Perhaps -- because the dress is the most popular garment at the spring collections. Baby-doll dresses that hug the bust and float over waist and hips give either a childlike or pregnant appearance,depending on to the voluptuousness of the model. Carolyne Roehm stuck massive crinolines under her baby dolls to create a portentously pregnant effect. Other favored dress shapes include the A-line worn as a graceful tunic over a slim skirt at Anne Klein and soft, drifting trapeze shapes at Michael Leva.
FEATURES
By VIDA ROBERTS | November 9, 1995
ANNA SUIIt's OK to watch the masters, but keeping up with the kids keeps the industry on its toes. Anna Sui is one designer who can take the goofiest downtown look and turn it into a saleable line. She's wise beyond her years.This year, she went to the Wee Kirk in the Vale rectory jumble sale and updated the old WASPY castoffs -- madras bermudas, McMullen linen shifts, Villager blouses and chino separates. She even enlarged and twisted some Pucci prints into a hip new shapes. She pumped up the colors and the patterns and yo!
FEATURES
By Vida Roberts and Vida Roberts,Staff Writer | June 24, 1993
New YorkRichard Tyler, designer to a galaxy of Hollywood's million-dollar luminaries, is turning his talents to designing for America's working woman.The man who has made frock coats and frocks for Julia Roberts, Kathleen Turner, Anjelica Huston, Susan Sarandon, Diana Ross, Oprah, Cher, Madonna and Prince is entering the mainstream.Who is Richard Tyler? He's a 44-year-old Los Angeles-based Australian designer of luxurious, couture-quality clothes-to-die-for, and he took New York by storm in April when he showed his first major fall collection under his own name.
FEATURES
By Amy M. Spindler and Amy M. Spindler,New York Times News Service | May 13, 1993
There is no more dramatic sign of the changing point of view of American sportswear than Richard Tyler's being named last week to replace Louis Dell'Olio as the designer at Anne Klein & Co.While both are the same age -- 44 -- Mr. Tyler is a West Coast designer, tanned and with wavy rock-star hair, and has developed a young Hollywood clientele. Mr. Dell'Olio is a child of Seventh Avenue, beginning his career at 24 at Anne Klein, working alongside Donna Karan until she left to start her own house.
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