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By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,SUN STAFF | May 11, 1997
One question troubling Hollywood these days is whether the comely 27-year-old actress Anne Heche has ruined her career by revealing herself publicly to be homosexual. Now that it is known she prefers women to men for her partners in love (or at least one woman), will some connection to her audience be broken, an essential chemistry or fantasy quotient irreversibly dimmed?Heche is the partner of Ellen DeGeneres, that Promethean lesbian now unbound and glowing on the heights of network television.
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By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,SUN STAFF | December 6, 1998
The suits at Universal are doubtless hoping that lightning will strike twice with "Psycho," director Gus Van Sant's much-hyped remake of the Alfred Hitchcock groundbreaker that earned a ton of money for Paramount back in 1960.Van Sant certainly wouldn't mind either - what director doesn't yearn to be called a genius? And Anne Heche (cast here as Marion Crane) probably wouldn't mind a career as long and as steady as her predecessor in that fatal shower, Janet Leigh.But at least one person associated with "Psycho" 1998 probably would prefer that history not repeat itself.
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By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | September 27, 1996
"Walking and Talking" is much more about hurting and crying than it is about walking. But fortunately, it's also about laughing.A clever examination of that painful existence known as the single life at crisis point, it's everything a small movie should be: shrewd, comic, sad and short.It examines one of those painful dilemmas invisible to the world at large but exquisitely endured by those who must face it: that is, what happens to a single woman when her best friend, also a single woman, gets married?
FEATURES
By Amy Biancolli and Amy Biancolli,ALBANY TIMES UNION | July 28, 1998
In "Singin' in the Rain," Stanley Donen's brilliant spoof of old Hollywood, a squeaky-voiced, platinum-shagged silent film goddess named Lina Lamont (played by Jean Hagen) is faced with a terrifying reality: sound.Movies are starting to talk, and she's got a voice that pops light bulbs. "I ceeeeeen't steend 'im!" bleats Lina in her strangled helium soprano, as her voice coach reacts with stoicism and dismay. Gently, she corrects her: "I caaaahn't staaahnd him."Finally, after weeks of struggling, Lina says on screen: "I caaaahhhhn't steend 'im!"
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,Sun Staff | June 12, 1998
Within the universe of summer movies, "Six Days, Seven Nights" is respectable enough: Two appealing stars create sparks against a scenically lush backdrop, while requisite moments of crude humor and violent action erupt with assuring regularity.Within the universe of movies in general, though, "Six Days, Seven Nights" sinks like a pretty stone, to be quickly forgotten once the next fluffy star vehicle takes its place. If lightness is the virtue of the definitive summer movie, instant disposability is its curse.
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | August 6, 1997
BOSTON -- Not that I am worried about Rupert Everett's career. Anyone who can dance away with the kudos at "My Best Friend's Wedding" is bound to catch bouquets.The British actor was more than Julia Roberts' gay consolation prize for losing the man she loved in that film, more than a walker at a wedding. He was campy, sensitive, sensible and, by anybody's definition, a true friend. He was the best man in the movie.So no one is surprised that Mr. Everett has lined up two more star turns: one as a gay secret agent, another as a married man coming to terms with coming out. Nor is it any wonder that the gay actor is being cast as a gay character.
FEATURES
By Amy Biancolli and Amy Biancolli,ALBANY TIMES UNION | July 28, 1998
In "Singin' in the Rain," Stanley Donen's brilliant spoof of old Hollywood, a squeaky-voiced, platinum-shagged silent film goddess named Lina Lamont (played by Jean Hagen) is faced with a terrifying reality: sound.Movies are starting to talk, and she's got a voice that pops light bulbs. "I ceeeeeen't steend 'im!" bleats Lina in her strangled helium soprano, as her voice coach reacts with stoicism and dismay. Gently, she corrects her: "I caaaahn't staaahnd him."Finally, after weeks of struggling, Lina says on screen: "I caaaahhhhn't steend 'im!"
FEATURES
By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,SUN STAFF | December 6, 1998
The suits at Universal are doubtless hoping that lightning will strike twice with "Psycho," director Gus Van Sant's much-hyped remake of the Alfred Hitchcock groundbreaker that earned a ton of money for Paramount back in 1960.Van Sant certainly wouldn't mind either - what director doesn't yearn to be called a genius? And Anne Heche (cast here as Marion Crane) probably wouldn't mind a career as long and as steady as her predecessor in that fatal shower, Janet Leigh.But at least one person associated with "Psycho" 1998 probably would prefer that history not repeat itself.
FEATURES
By Frank Rizzo and Frank Rizzo,HARTFORD COURANT | January 6, 1998
NEW YORK -- Anne Heche had no problems answering questions -- about anything.Chatty, vivacious and funny, the 27-year-old actress talked frankly about her romantic relationship with comedian Ellen DeGeneres, her disapproving religious family and her very hot career, including her latest work, "Wag the Dog."It was the journalists who were a little tongue-tied.After all, it's unusual for a Hollywood star to address his or her sexuality without being coy, calculating or closeted."You know what's so funny?"
FEATURES
By ANN HORNADAY | June 21, 1998
Pauline Kael, the legendary movie critic, retired from the New Yorker in 1991. This week she is interviewed in a special edition of Newsweek. Kael levels her gaze at some recent pictures and some current stars, deploying her characteristically trenchant prose:On Jim Carrey: "An inspired rough-and-tumble comedian." On Anne Heche: "She has a lovely, fragile Pierrette quality, and she's a fearless actress. But she's got an obstacle in her career. Because, realistically, it may be difficult for some people to accept certain kinds of knowledge about a performer's off-screen life."
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,Sun Staff | June 12, 1998
Within the universe of summer movies, "Six Days, Seven Nights" is respectable enough: Two appealing stars create sparks against a scenically lush backdrop, while requisite moments of crude humor and violent action erupt with assuring regularity.Within the universe of movies in general, though, "Six Days, Seven Nights" sinks like a pretty stone, to be quickly forgotten once the next fluffy star vehicle takes its place. If lightness is the virtue of the definitive summer movie, instant disposability is its curse.
FEATURES
By Frank Rizzo and Frank Rizzo,HARTFORD COURANT | January 6, 1998
NEW YORK -- Anne Heche had no problems answering questions -- about anything.Chatty, vivacious and funny, the 27-year-old actress talked frankly about her romantic relationship with comedian Ellen DeGeneres, her disapproving religious family and her very hot career, including her latest work, "Wag the Dog."It was the journalists who were a little tongue-tied.After all, it's unusual for a Hollywood star to address his or her sexuality without being coy, calculating or closeted."You know what's so funny?"
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | August 6, 1997
BOSTON -- Not that I am worried about Rupert Everett's career. Anyone who can dance away with the kudos at "My Best Friend's Wedding" is bound to catch bouquets.The British actor was more than Julia Roberts' gay consolation prize for losing the man she loved in that film, more than a walker at a wedding. He was campy, sensitive, sensible and, by anybody's definition, a true friend. He was the best man in the movie.So no one is surprised that Mr. Everett has lined up two more star turns: one as a gay secret agent, another as a married man coming to terms with coming out. Nor is it any wonder that the gay actor is being cast as a gay character.
NEWS
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,SUN STAFF | May 11, 1997
One question troubling Hollywood these days is whether the comely 27-year-old actress Anne Heche has ruined her career by revealing herself publicly to be homosexual. Now that it is known she prefers women to men for her partners in love (or at least one woman), will some connection to her audience be broken, an essential chemistry or fantasy quotient irreversibly dimmed?Heche is the partner of Ellen DeGeneres, that Promethean lesbian now unbound and glowing on the heights of network television.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | September 27, 1996
"Walking and Talking" is much more about hurting and crying than it is about walking. But fortunately, it's also about laughing.A clever examination of that painful existence known as the single life at crisis point, it's everything a small movie should be: shrewd, comic, sad and short.It examines one of those painful dilemmas invisible to the world at large but exquisitely endured by those who must face it: that is, what happens to a single woman when her best friend, also a single woman, gets married?
NEWS
May 25, 2009
'White Ribbon,' 'Inglourious Basterds,' shine at Cannes Austrian director Michael Haneke's somber drama The White Ribbon claimed the Palme d'Or on Sunday at the Cannes Film Festival, where Quentin Tarantino and Lars von Trier entries earned the acting honors. It was a big night for Austria, whose triumphs included Christoph Waltz as best actor for Tarantino's World War II epic Inglourious Basterds. Charlotte Gainsbourg won the best-actress honor for von Trier's Antichrist, a film that riled and repelled many Cannes viewers with its explicit images of physical abuse involving a grieving couple.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | August 14, 1998
A guy you hardly know, save for a few weeks spent clowning around on a tropical island, is going to die unless you agree to spend up to six years rotting away in a Third World prison. What would you do?That's the dilemma presented by "Return to Paradise," a suspenseful, enjoyably not-what-you'd-expect morality play. Featuring a wonderfully nuanced performance from Anne Heche, the film suffers in the end from a script more interested in piquing the conscience than fleshing out its plot and characters.
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