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NEWS
February 2, 1993
The warning signs are all there. The Annapolis Housing Authority is headed for serious trouble again.Suspicious bidding procedures, an ongoing federal audit, waning support from housing commission members -- these problems are casting a shadow over Executive Director Harold S. Greene.Four years ago, Mr. Greene was hailed as a savior of Annapolis' public housing operation while his predecessor, Arthur G. Strissel Jr., went to federal prison for fraud, bid-rigging and taking bribes.While there is no indication that the current troubles are in this league, Mr. Greene'e tendency to dismiss them as "blown out of proportion" could spell trouble.
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NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | July 16, 2014
The mayor of Annapolis says he will not reappoint civil rights activist Carl O. Snowden to the board that oversees public housing communities in the city. Mayor Mike Pantelides sent a letter to Snowden on Wednesday indicating he would not reappoint Snowden to the Housing Authority of the City of Annapolis when his term expires at the end of the month. He has not announced who he will nominate to replace Snowden. Snowden, 61, was appointed to the authority's board in 2009 and is the board's chairman.
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NEWS
By Dan Thanh Dang and Dan Thanh Dang,SUN STAFF | July 29, 1998
Drugs and crime make Louise Prather and her six children prisoners inside a stuffy and rundown two-bedroom apartment in College Creek Terrace, a public housing complex just blocks from the historic State House.But she dismisses talk of a chance at a $25 million federal grant designed to bring new houses, new jobs and home ownership as "promises that are too good to be true.""Everybody keeps talking about hope," says Prather, 31, who has lived in public housing most of her life. "There is no hope.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | October 28, 2013
Marita Carroll, a retired Annapolis elementary school teacher and civil rights activist who was arrested on trespassing charges in 1960 as she sat at a bus stop lunch counter, died of complications from Alzheimer's disease Saturday at Anne Arundel Medical Center. The Eastport resident was 91. She became known as a member of the "Annapolis Five" for her role in helping to end segregation at local restaurants. She was later board chair of the city's housing authority. "Ms. Carroll represented a generation of activists who believed that one must be willing to take risk in order to bring about social change," said former Annapolis Alderman Carl O. Snowden.
NEWS
By Amanda J. Crawford and Michael Dresser and Amanda J. Crawford and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | July 17, 2003
Two weeks before public housing residents are slated to move into new state-built townhouses on the waterfront along Rowe Boulevard in Annapolis, a state official frustrated by delays and complaints about unsightly storage sheds has threatened to take legal action and sell the units to private residents instead. Department of General Services Secretary Boyd Rutherford said at a meeting of the state Board of Public Works yesterday that he would view any attempt by the Annapolis Housing Authority to delay residents from moving into the new $8.4 million Bloomsbury Square community as a "breach of contract."
NEWS
By Dan Thanh Dang and Dan Thanh Dang,SUN STAFF | October 11, 1996
News of the possible ouster of Harold S. Greene as director of the Annapolis Housing Authority produced mixed reactions yesterday from city officials, who credited the native New Yorker with restoring the image of a scandal-ridden agency.The authority's Board of Commissioners confirmed yesterday that they are considering dismissing Greene and that an evaluation of his performance is under way."It grieves me greatly that this is happening," said deputy director Roger W. "Pip" Moyer, a former mayor.
NEWS
June 12, 1998
THE ANNAPOLIS Housing Authority wisely decided to delay for one year its bid for a federal grant to rebuild public housing on Clay Street, a few hundred feet from the headquarters of Anne Arundel County government.Though revitalization of rundown housing should happen sooner rather than later, the authority needs first to win the support and participation of tenants.Residents remain fearful that this project, HOPE VI, is a reincarnation of urban renewal of the late 1960s and early 1970s, a strategy they recall with disdain.
NEWS
By Paul Shread and Paul Shread,Staff writer | January 21, 1991
The state has included $3.5 million in its proposed capital budget to buy the Bloomsbury Square housing project in Annapolis, government sources said Friday.State officials will unveil the budget at a briefing today. The legislature must approve the money to buy the development.State officials have wanted to buy Bloomsbury Square for two decades, but Harold Greene, executive director of the Annapolis Housing Authority, said his agency was in no hurry to sell the 51-unit development."They could put $10.5 million in there and it doesn't mean we would sell it," Greene said.
NEWS
November 7, 1991
Playing as boys do, Terrence Tolbert made the mistake of crawling into an electrical transformer box in an Annapolis housing project to retrieve a stick. It cost him his right arm and severe burns. The Annapolis Housing Authority has agreed to a $200,000 settlement, but says it isn't to blame because vandals broke the lock on the box. Baltimore Gas & Electric Co. says it has nothing to do with equipment owned by the agency. Caught in this abdication of responsibility is an eight-year-old child trying to adjust to life with an artificial limb.
NEWS
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,SUN STAFF | September 30, 1999
Reviewing a bill to allow police to disperse loiterers in public housing communities, an Annapolis city council committee questioned last night the need for the measure if Housing Authority security guards already have such power.The city's Public Safety Committee grilled Annapolis Police Chief Joseph Johnson and Alderman Herbert H. McMillan, who wrote the bill, about the need for the anti-drug loitering law, which the council could vote on next month.The bill aims to create "Drug-Loitering Free Zones" and give police the power to disperse loiterers whose behavior raises suspicion of drug activity, or who have been convicted of drug charges in the past seven years, even if the zones are on private property.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | July 15, 2013
The Newtowne 20 public housing community in Annapolis is about to get a new life. The Housing Authority of the City of Annapolis has started the process to renovate or rebuild the aging 78-unit complex at the end of a dead-end street off Forest Drive. The project is likely to cost at least $4 million and will be done in partnership with a nonprofit or for-profit company, as has been the case in other housing revitalization projects in Annapolis. "This, physically, is our worst property," said Joseph S. Johnson, a former city police chief who is chief of staff and security for the housing authority.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | June 20, 2013
The Annapolis Market House is open -- sort of. The first vendor in the downtown landmark, Amsterdam Falafelshop, planned a soft opening with a private guest list for Thursday night. After a few more private events, they hope to have the eatery open for good by Sunday night or Monday, said Amrish Vyas, owner of the Annapolis location of Amsterdam Falafelshop. The company has popular eateries in Washington, D.C., and Somerville, Mass. They serve falafel with an assortment of toppings, as well as french fries and brownies.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | June 17, 2013
A decade since the 2003 tropical storm that began its fiscal and operational woes, Market House in downtown Annapolis is expected to reopen in the coming weeks with a lineup of vendors selling falafel, gelato, sandwiches and crab cakes from the historic building. Since Tropical Storm Isabel blew through and flooded the building in 2003, the Market House has operated in fits and starts as the city struggled to repair the building and attract a stable lineup of vendors. Between renovations and lawsuits from former tenants, the city has spent millions of dollars on the Market House since 2003.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | December 31, 2012
Downtown Annapolis' Market House, a historic landmark that has been open only intermittently since 2003, is scheduled to reopen in the spring after being closed this year, according to Mayor Joshua Cohen. "In terms of a specific opening date, it's premature to mark that. Our focus with the Market House is not just to get it open, but to get it done well," Cohen said. The reopening, he said, will begin a "new chapter of the Market House's history. " The 19th-century waterfront building was flooded in 2003 during Tropical Storm Isabel, and since then has faced disputes with renters and political opposition.
NEWS
January 15, 2012
Annapolis housing officials have confirmed that city Alderman Kenneth A. Kirby is not an approved tenant or visitor of a city-owned apartment where he was found during a drug raid earlier this month. Kirby faced questions about his residency after the Jan. 5 raid of two apartments, with housing officials investigating whether he was staying there in violation of a lease agreement. Police have said Kirby is not accused of any wrongdoing in connection with the drug raid. Housing Authority chief operating officer Joseph Johnson told The Capital in Annapolis that the agency's paperwork does not list Kirby as a tenant or visitor of the city-owned apartment in the Harbour House community.
HEALTH
By Nicole Fuller, The Baltimore Sun | May 11, 2011
The Annapolis Public Housing Authority's board will vote Thursday on a plan to ban some window air conditioning units in three of the city's housing complexes in order to comply with federal and local safety standards — a proposal that many residents are rallying against. Carl Snowden, chairman of the board, said he plans to vote for the ban, which would affect about 344 apartments in Robinwood, Newtowne 20 and Eastport Terrace, because the units pose a serious safety issue. Snowden said the city fire marshall and federal housing policy requires at least two emergency exits in the case of a fire or other emergency.
NEWS
By Dan Thanh Dang and Dan Thanh Dang,SUN STAFF | May 28, 1998
Members of the Clay Street community accused Annapolis Housing Authority officials last night of trying to evict longtime residents through a proposed multimillion-dollar renovation of two public housing complexes.The residents call the plan a "miniurban renewal project" similar to one in the 1970s that was blamed for destroying much of the mostly black downtown community.Back then, residents characterized it as "urban removal" and said it displaced dozens of black businesses and sent hundreds of black families out of the downtown area into housing projects on the city line.
NEWS
By Paul Shread and Paul Shread,Staff writer | March 29, 1991
Bloomsbury Square is safe -- for nowA state House Appropriations subcommittee has cut Gov. William Donald Schaefer's request for $3.5 million to buy the Annapolis housing project, which the state has wanted to buy for more than 20years. Tuesday's vote postpones the sale for at least a year."I feel good," said Elsie Clark, 88, who has lived in Bloomsbury Square since 1950. "I don't feel like moving nowhere. It'd be a shameto sell it, after they fixed it up all nice, and tear it down for parking.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller, The Baltimore Sun | November 13, 2010
The Annapolis Market House might not be confined to its four walls. Plans to revitalize the historic market call for a farmers' market just outside its doors, in addition to a new layout inside that will include vendors such as a French bakery and an oyster bar. New, bigger doors and an emphasis on highlighting merchandise in the windows will give the relatively small market an expansive feeling. "We want to open it up and go back to the heyday of the market and really reimagine it," said Baltimore-based developer Lehr Jackson, who presented his vision last week to the Economic Matter Committee of the Annapolis city council.
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