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By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,SUN STAFF | December 25, 2002
The Historic Annapolis Foundation's chief executive resigned this week, noting philosophical differences over the nonprofit organization's direction. Brian Alexander, 51, unexpectedly announced he was leaving after two years as president and chief executive officer at a board meeting yesterday. "We just had philosophical differences about where we wanted to take the future," Alexander said yesterday. "I have a strong museum background and they want to focus on preservation." The 50-year-old foundation, which manages some of the city's most beloved landmarks and historic homes, chose Greg Stiverson, executive director of the Historic London Town and Gardens in Edgewater, to replace Alexander.
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NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts | February 7, 2010
T he newspaper ad, were it to run today, might appear in a lost-and-found column, wedged between yard sales and apartments for rent. Yet it could hardly say more about the spirit of an age. "Ran away from the Subscriber living in Annapolis, a young Country-born Negro Man named Harry," it said. "He is of a yellowish Complexion, near 6 Feet high, brisk and active. Had on and took with him a Wig, a new Felt Hat, a grey Pea Jacket, red Waistcoat and Breeches ... "Whoever takes up the said Negro, and delivers him to me, at Annapolis, shall have THREE POUNDS Reward.
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NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | March 21, 2005
Samantha Alexandra Poyer, a 9-year-old who lives in Annapolis, was ready to celebrate Maryland Day yesterday as she and her family visited a tiny historic house on Pinkney Street in the state capital. She knew what a diamondback terrapin, a calico cat and the medieval art of jousting have in common. All are state symbols - identified as the official state reptile, cat and sport. Then again, this was no beginner - Samantha's family had come to the same festivities last year, organized by the Historic Annapolis Foundation, a nonprofit historic preservation group that opens its doors free to the public on the Sunday before March 25, the official date of the English colony's birth in 1634.
NEWS
August 21, 2008
$186,000 in grants offered to four groups in Four Rivers The Maryland Heritage Areas Authority has approved more than $186,000 for four grant project proposals within Four Rivers: The Heritage Area of Annapolis, London Town & South County. The grant money totalling $186,916 will support regional heritage-related projects totaling more than $397,000. All grants are matched at the local level. In addition to receiving $100,000 for operating and program assistance, Four Rivers helped the following local heritage-related organizations in obtaining MHAA funding: * The Annapolis Maritime Museum will receive $50,000 to support an interactive exhibit entitled Oysters on the Half Shell, the first component of its new Bay Experience Center in the reconstructed McNasby Oyster Company building in Eastport.
NEWS
April 14, 1997
Slayton Show House chosen to be featured in magazine's tourThe Historic Annapolis Foundation's Slayton Show House has been selected by Traditional Home magazine to be featured on the magazine's 1997 Showhouse Tour.The house at 112 Duke of Gloucester St., which will be open for tours in Annapolis Friday through May 18, will be one of four prestigious show houses spotlighted on this national tour.Tickets for tours of the Slayton Show House will be $12 ($10 for prepaid or group tour purchases)
NEWS
April 28, 2002
Historic Annapolis Foundation is sponsoring a workshop, Techniques for Preserving Your Home When Paint Isn't Enough, from 9:30 a.m. to noon, Saturday at William Paca House and Garden, 186 Prince George St., Annapolis. The cost of the workshop is $10 for foundation members and $15 for nonmembers. Advance reservations and prepayment are required, and can be made by contacting the Historic Annapolis Foundation. Information: 410 267-7619, Ext. 8146. Children's summer camp to focus on history Children ages 6 to 10 can discover history during a summer camp July 15 through 19 at Captain Salem Avery House Museum, 1418 E.W. Shady Road.
FEATURES
By JoAnne C. Broadwater and JoAnne C. Broadwater,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 20, 1997
The best of the old and the new have been blended together with style and savvy in a thoroughly modern yet historic show house in the heart of Annapolis.Volunteers from the Historic Annapolis Foundation and interior designers from Maryland, Washington and New York have transformed a neglected 18th-century rowhouse into a designer showcase that is just right for a family of the '90s."Every historic structure does not have to be a museum," said Sharon Kennedy, executive co-chair for the Slayton Show House.
FEATURES
By JoAnne C. Broadwater and JoAnne C. Broadwater,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 20, 1997
The best of the old and the new have been blended together with style and savvy in a thoroughly modern yet historic show house in the heart of Annapolis.Volunteers from the Historic Annapolis Foundation and interior designers from Maryland, Washington and New York have transformed a neglected 18th-century rowhouse into a designer showcase that is just right for a family of the '90s."Every historic structure does not have to be a museum," said Sharon Kennedy, executive co-chair for the Slayton Show House.
NEWS
June 30, 1994
The Historic Annapolis Foundation has undertaken a big and costly project: It involves practically rebuilding the crumbling Maynard-Burgess House, a shingled, wood-frame structure across the street from Annapolis City Hall that is believed to be the first home in Maryland's capital owned by a free black man.Like all restoration jobs, this one is likely to be unpredictable. As owners of old houses know, repairing one problem usually leads to the detection of others. And the Maynard-Burgess House has some very serious problems.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | January 5, 1998
An Anne Arundel Circuit judge wants lawyers for the Historic Annapolis Foundation, the city and a Main Street property owner to try to straighten out the legal morass brought on by the fire that destroyed 184-186 Main St.Judge James C. Cawood Jr. has scheduled a meeting with the lawyers and building owner Thursday in his chambers.Last week, Ronald B. Hollander, who owns the building gutted in a five-alarm fire Dec. 9, asked the court to review two city decisions that prevent him from demolishing the remains of the 1899 structure.
ENTERTAINMENT
By SARAH MARSTON | July 6, 2006
CHRISTIAN FESTIVAL The Billy Graham Evangelistic Association will hold the Metro Maryland Festival tomorrow through Sunday at Oriole Park at Camden Yards. The event includes music by American Idol finalist George Huff, Andrae Crouch and Randy Travis, as well as speeches from Franklin Graham, Billy Graham's son. Billy Graham will also speak, health permitting. Saturday morning features KidzFest. ....................... The festival events are at 7 p.m. tomorrow, 7 p.m. Saturday and 4 p.m. Sunday . KidzFest will be at 10 a.m. Saturday.
NEWS
By JAMIE STIEHM and JAMIE STIEHM,SUN REPORTER | June 13, 2006
Starbucks is renewing its efforts to put a 21st-century coffee shop in the 18th-century Maryland Inn in Annapolis. The idea drew protests when it was first raised a few months ago, but the Seattle-based corporation has modified its plan and won some important supporters for the idea of opening a high-end coffee shop in a place that once housed a tavern visited by George Washington. The Annapolis Historic Preservation Commission is scheduled to consider tonight proposed changes to the property's exterior to accommodate a Starbucks-licensed store - similar to a franchise.
NEWS
By JAMIE STIEHM and JAMIE STIEHM,SUN REPORTER | May 28, 2006
Gregory A. Stiverson, the most visible advocate of preservation in Annapolis, announced last week that he will leave in December when his four-year contract ends. Stiverson, president and chief executive of the Historic Annapolis Foundation, said he achieved his main goal with last month's grand opening of HistoryQuest at the St. Clair Wright Center. The foundation's board had spent a half-century discussing how to create a place where tourists, residents and the Naval Academy community could get an overview of the state capital's history.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | March 21, 2005
Samantha Alexandra Poyer, a 9-year-old who lives in Annapolis, was ready to celebrate Maryland Day yesterday as she and her family visited a tiny historic house on Pinkney Street in the state capital. She knew what a diamondback terrapin, a calico cat and the medieval art of jousting have in common. All are state symbols - identified as the official state reptile, cat and sport. Then again, this was no beginner - Samantha's family had come to the same festivities last year, organized by the Historic Annapolis Foundation, a nonprofit historic preservation group that opens its doors free to the public on the Sunday before March 25, the official date of the English colony's birth in 1634.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | December 11, 2004
The minds that created the jazzy Spy Museum in Washington will help design a hip storytelling center that seeks to capture three centuries of Annapolis history. At a groundbreaking ceremony yesterday, more than 100 members of the Historic Annapolis Foundation sipped hot cider as they cheered plans for a history center in what is now a plain brick three-story structure at 99 Main St. The idea is to provide a window to seeing the city as a "museum without walls." While history is told in various places here - the State House, the Naval Academy, City Dock - the Annapolis History Center, slated to open in spring 2006, will try to blend these elements and focus on the evolution of the capital city.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lori Sears and Lori Sears,SUN STAFF | November 4, 2004
COMING UP He's a Nobel Peace Prize winner. A respected author and speaker. A Boston University professor. A Holocaust survivor. He's Elie Wiesel. And he'll be speaking at the Yeshivat Rambam school's 14th anniversary event Sunday at the Lyric Opera House. "An Evening With Nobel Prize Laureate Elie Wiesel" features an uplifting talk by Wiesel, who will discuss his belief that through faith and hope, human beings can overcome and survive any and all obstacles. The evening will include tributes to noted supporters of the school.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | February 25, 1999
An Anne Arundel County judge this week threw out a $40,000 claim against Annapolis and the Historic Annapolis Foundation by the owner of a burned building in the city's historic district.The ruling does not stop Ronald B. Hollander from filing his claim in a new lawsuit, however.184-186 Main St.Hollander owns 184-186 Main St., a building reduced to rubble and a facade in a December 1997 blaze. The Historic Annapolis Foundation sought an injunction to bar Hollander from razing the facade, and that touched off an argument that shows no sign of ending.
NEWS
By Kevin Harrison | March 12, 1995
Eleanor Barr of Severna ParkThe Volunteer: Eleanor Barr has been a volunteer with the Historic Annapolis Foundation since 1984.Ms. Barr, a Severna Park resident, became involved with the foundation because of her interest in history and preservation. She volunteers as a docent about two days a week at the Shiplap House and Maritime Museum in Annapolis.A member of St. Anne's Episcopal Church in Annapolis, she taught in Anne Arundel and Charles counties before her retirement.Mary Salsich, the volunteer coordinator for the foundation, writes that Ms. Barr "is extremely generous with her time.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sun Staff | January 15, 2004
Trips Aviation sites -- including College Park's Aviation Museum -- mark the 100th anniversary of flight all year. page 18. Stage Director Bill Alexander talks about the Shakespeare Theatre's production of Henry 1V, Part 1, which stars Christopher Kelly as Prince Hal and Keith Baxter in the titular role. page 12. Outside Prepare for outdoor treks to Kenya, Nepal or Peru -- or just stay in shape -- practicing rock climbing at Earth Treks facilities in Timonium and Columbia. page 30. PICK OF THE WEEK What: "Maryland's First Silver: Eighteenth-Century Annapolis Silver," an exhibit that's part of the Historic Annapolis Antiques Show When: Tomorrow-Sunday Where: E. Leslie Medford Armory on Hudson Street in Annapolis Why: Because now is your chance to see some state artifacts, including these two teaspoons, given to the Historic Annapolis Foundation by Mrs. J.M.P.
NEWS
December 23, 2003
Margaret M. Dowsett, a former newspaperwoman and devoted historical preservationist, died in her sleep Thursday at her home in Annapolis. She was 93. Born Margaret Moss in Annapolis, she was raised in Sands House, the oldest frame house in the city. She graduated from Annapolis High School in 1929 and attended Strayer's Business College in Baltimore. Between 1931 and 1937, she worked as a reporter and society columnist for the Southern Maryland Times, the Baltimore News-Post and the Washington Herald.
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