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By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | August 21, 2014
Musicians will sing and strum and play the harmonica Thursday night in Annapolis night to raise funds — and awareness — for Lyme disease. Headlining the Ticked Off Music Fest will be Les Stroud, a TV survivalist and musician from Canada. He'll be joined by two musicians who survived Lyme disease and a lawyer-singer-songwriter from Annapolis. "My hope is to bring awareness to Anne Arundel County about the dangers of tick-borne diseases," said Karen Owen, a fitness instructor and mother from the Broadneck community who is organizing the concert.
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FEATURES
By Marie Marciano Gullard, For the Baltimore Sun | August 21, 2014
Three nautical miles from downtown Annapolis but seeming worlds away is the private peninsula where Mill and Burley creeks meet the Chesapeake Bay - and where 2077 Maidstone Farm Road, a nine-acre estate with 2,000 feet of waterfront, awaits its new owner. A Tudor-style home built of stucco in 1916 harks back to an era of elegant living. Touches of period craftsmanship outside and inside were provided by Italian artisans commissioned by the home's owner and builder, James Bowdoin, great-grandson of the founder of Bowdoin College in Maine.
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NEWS
July 2, 2012
West Street in Annapolis is getting a nicer look with new and wider sidewalks thanks in part to the state highway administration's compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act. I own property on West Street and the new sidewalks makes the main entrance to our charming, historic town look like someone cares about our great city. Once the agency finishes installing the new sidewalks, let's all do our part to make Annapolis a clean and safe city again. Bill Labros, Annapolis
NEWS
August 21, 2014
Traffic delays are possible on Sunday during the annual Annapolis Striders' Ten-Mile Run. A number of streets will be closed to accommodate the race, which begins at 7 a.m. at Navy-Marine Corps Memorial Stadium in Annapolis. The race will also finish at the stadium by about 9:30 a.m. Streets that will be closed during part or all of the race include Taylor Avenue, Cedar Park Road, Farragut Road, Rowe Boulevard and the intersection of Taylor and Rowe in the stadium area; Northwest Street, Church Circle, Main Street, Randall Street, King George Street and College Avenue in the historic district; the Naval Academy Bridge over the Severn River; and parts of Route 648 in the Pendennis Mount/Ferry Farms neighborhood.
NEWS
May 20, 2012
Just like our government, the tax-and-spend loving Sun doesn't get it ("Unfinished business," May 16). It's not really about a lousy 1 percent or 2 percent gas or income tax increase. The people of this state are rebelling against wasteful spending and ever-increasing budgets by our greedy, clueless government. If for once in their pathetic political lives, our politicians would start spending our money in a responsible and frugal manner, then just maybe we would be willing to consider an increase in taxes or fees without "hand-wringing and demagoguery" as suggested by The Sun. Here's my suggestion to our legislators: Stop the indiscriminate, wasteful spending, bloated budgets, and stealing of funds and replace all the money pilfered from our transportation fund, and maybe you would have enough money to fund needed projects without raising taxes in this depressed economy of ours.
NEWS
February 12, 2010
The February 4 Maryland General Assembly hearings conducted by the Ways and Means Committee were an incredible performance of utter rudeness and arrogance. Although not surprised, at least 20 of us, both veterans of such hearings and unacquainted rookies, were unanimously dumbfounded by it. Needless to say, Chairwoman Sheila Hixson's leadership was embarrassingly lacking. We went to listen, learn and/or testify on House bills 92 and 204, a job creation and tax credit bill and a bill to create a propertyt ax assessment and appeals task force.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | May 21, 2014
The acting city attorney in Annapolis - who had visited the police station when the mayor's cousin was arrested - has resigned, Mayor Mike Pantelides announced Wednesday. Pantelides brought Timothy Murnane to City Hall as acting city attorney after Murnane helped oversee a nail-biter ballot count following November's election. But Pantelides was unable to get the city council to confirm Murnane as the permanent city attorney. When Murnane's confirmation came before the council in December, the aldermen elected to postpone the vote.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | August 6, 2013
More than two dozen Annapolis residents are asking the city's Board of Supervisors of Elections to investigate the residency of Alderman Kenneth Kirby, who is running for re-election this fall. Kirby, a Democrat, has had repeated controversy over where he lives , dating to early 2012, when Kirby was found staying at a public housing apartment that police searched as part of a drug investigation. Kirby was not accused of any criminal wrongdoing, but the incident raised questions about his residency, because the apartment where he was staying was not his official address.
NEWS
May 18, 2012
Now that the tax catastrophe is over, many photos will be snapped of Gov.Martin O'Malley, Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller and House SpeakerMichael E. Buschgloating over their "accomplishments. " Frankly. I don't know how these three can sleep at night. F. Cordell, Lutherville
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jill Rosen and The Baltimore Sun | June 11, 2012
Jane Fonda was so smitten with Maryland's capital city that state tourism officials have taken to calling her "Annapolis' newest ambassador. " The actress was walking the cobblestone streets of Annapolis the other day to film a cameo in the movie “Better Living Through Chemistry," a shoot that's been underway there for a number of weeks. But unlike stars who parachute in and zip out with barely a look around, Fonda was into Annapolis, shooting tons of pictures of the historical vistas and then, later devoting a blog post to the town.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | August 21, 2014
Musicians will sing and strum and play the harmonica Thursday night in Annapolis night to raise funds — and awareness — for Lyme disease. Headlining the Ticked Off Music Fest will be Les Stroud, a TV survivalist and musician from Canada. He'll be joined by two musicians who survived Lyme disease and a lawyer-singer-songwriter from Annapolis. "My hope is to bring awareness to Anne Arundel County about the dangers of tick-borne diseases," said Karen Owen, a fitness instructor and mother from the Broadneck community who is organizing the concert.
NEWS
By Nayana Davis, The Baltimore Sun | August 19, 2014
When Cynthia McBride moved her art gallery to its current location in Annapolis more than two decades ago, she was worried that customers wouldn't be able to find the business. McBride Gallery, which specializes in classical-style paintings, had relocated to 215 Main St., just a block from its original space. But McBride was so concerned she rallied the owners of other local galleries to put on an art walk to spread the news and showcase their offerings. "It was a lazy, hazy road at that time," she said with a laugh.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | August 17, 2014
The city of Annapolis has named dozens of retired police officers and firefighters in a federal lawsuit, the latest tactic in a decade-long legal battle over changes to retiree pensions. In court filings last week, the city asked a judge to rule that a recent switch to an annual 2 percent cost-of-living increase for retirees — instead of a previous sliding scale tied to city employee raises — is legal. Attorney Eric Paltell, who represents the city in the case, said a ruling is needed because, "the retirees have made it crystal clear that they do not believe this is legal.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 15, 2014
George N. Manis, founder of the Annapolis law firm of Manis, Canning & Associates, died Wednesday of heart failure at the Fairfield Nursing Center in Crownsville. He was 85. The son of Nick Manis and Harriet Manis, Greek immigrants, George Nick Manis was born and raised in Annapolis. His father owned The Presto restaurant in Annapolis. Mr. Manis attended Manlius Prep School in DeWitt, N.Y., and Annapolis High School, where he was a star basketball player and was named to the All State national tournament team.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson, For The Baltimore Sun | August 14, 2014
Annapolis Summer Garden Theatre is capping its season with "Monty Python's Spamalot" an irreverent retelling of the quest for the Holy Grail. The silliness of "Spamalot" is totally at home in Summer Garden's outdoor theater, where a lively cast delivers a production of zesty dancing guys and girls, lusty choruses and zany comedians. The 2005 musical, with book and lyrics by Eric Idle, who also composed the music with John Du Prez, is based on the 1975 movie "Monty Python and the Holy Grail.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | August 12, 2014
Tuesday's flooding may have been extreme, but it wasn't unfamiliar for much of the region. The low spots are well known: Compromise and Dock streets in Annapolis, Caroline and Thames streets in Fells Point. After a good rain and a high tide, they're under water. For Maryland's two largest cities on the Chesapeake, flooding that once occurred just a day or two in any given year is increasingly common - more so than anywhere else in the country, according to a recent federal study.
NEWS
March 20, 2012
If the teacher pensions are transferred to the counties, the real losers are the taxpayers of Maryland ("A costly breakthrough," March 13). The state is in debt and can't meet it's commitments. One of its solutions is to transfer teacher pension costs. The counties, of course, do not have the money to pay for them either. Ergo, while Gov.Martin O'Malleycan claim he's balancing the budget and not raising taxes even higher, the counties will have to raise taxes to pay the pensions.
EXPLORE
August 26, 2011
I've been doing a lot of research into investments lately. My conclusion has been that stocks are too risky because of electronic trading, bonds are too risky because politicians are incompetent, and traditional banks have next to zero return on investment. I had heard of peer-to-peer lending in the past, but discovered today that it is quickly becoming a legitimate investment option. Returns start at 5 percent and grow linearly as risk increases. It operates essentially the way banks are supposed to: borrow at X percent, lend at Y percent and pocket the difference for arranging the transaction.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson, For The Baltimore Sun | August 11, 2014
After three successful seasons, the Annapolis Shakespeare Company is completing its final production as a resident theater company at Bowie Playhouse with a fine production of Shakespeare's "The Tempest," continuing weekends through Aug. 17. Annapolis Shakespeare was founded in 2009 by Sally Boyett as a workshop group and quickly rose to become an accomplished performance company at Bowie Playhouse. Nevertheless, when the troupe made its Bowie debut in 2011 with "Twelfth Night," one could hardly have anticipated it outgrowing this venue in just three years.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | August 11, 2014
Police identified the victim of a Sunday homicide in Annapolis as 21-year-old Mark Alexander Cooper. At around 1:20 a.m. Sunday, officers went to the 1100 block of Madison Street to investigate a report of gunshots, the Annapolis Police Department said. They found Cooper, who was from Glenarden, near a bench at a baseball field suffering from gunshot wounds, police said. He was pronounced dead at the scene. He was the first person to be killed in Annapolis this year. iduncan@baltsun.com twitter.com/iduncan
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