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December 5, 2004
On November 19, 2004, SHANTA ADWOA ANNAN; beloved daughter of Albert and Mary Ann Annan, and a 2004 graduate of Perry Hall High School. On Sunday, friends may call at THE NEW VAUGHN C. GREENE FUNERAL SERVICES (RANDALLSTOWN), 8728 Liberty Road, from 4 to 8 P.M. On Monday, the family will receive friends from 10 to 11 A.M. at the Pikesville Seventh Day Adventist Church, 4619 Old Court Road, with services to follow. Inquiries to (410) 655-0015.
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NEWS
By Edmund Sanders and Edmund Sanders,Los Angeles Times | February 27, 2008
NAIROBI, Kenya -- Saying that efforts to resolve Kenya's political crisis have stalled, former U.N. Secretary-General Kofi Annan suspended mediation talks yesterday and called upon the nation's presidential rivals to work with him directly. "We cannot continue on the current basis," Annan said last night after a daylong session with negotiating teams representing the government and the opposition ended in insults and acrimony. "We were turning around in circles." Also yesterday, U.S. Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice, who visited Kenya last week to urge a settlement, expressed disappointment in what she called a "failure of leadership."
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NEWS
May 9, 2004
On Friday May 6, 2004 HUME O. ANNAN JR.,, died in Cumberland. Survivors include his wife Peggy, daughter Nancy Street and son Richard Annan. Visitation in Upchurch Funeral Home, P.A., 202 Greene St., Cumberland, on Monday from 2 to 4 and 7 to 9 P.m. and Tuesday from 1 to 2 P.M. Services Tuesday May 11 at 2 P.M. at the funeral home. Interment Rose Hill Cemetery. Memorial contributions, may be made to Alleghany H.S. Library, c/o Finance Dept., 108 Washington St., Cumberland, MD 21502.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service. | February 6, 2008
NAIROBI, Kenya -- The death toll in the aftermath of Kenya's flawed elections surpassed 1,000 people yesterday, as negotiations entered a critical stage in the effort to end the country's violent political situation. According to the Red Cross, which tabulated the casualties, most of the killings have been in the turbulent Rift Valley, where gangs from opposing ethnic groups have fought fiercely in the past few days. "It's a very volatile situation out there," said Anthony Mwangi, a spokesman for the Kenya Red Cross.
NEWS
By Ken Ellingwood and Megan K. Stack and Ken Ellingwood and Megan K. Stack,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 30, 2006
JERUSALEM -- U.N. Secretary-General Kofi Annan arrived yesterday for talks with Israeli leaders after calling again for an end to Israel's blockade of Lebanon and the release of two captured Israeli soldiers. Annan's visit is part of an 11-day tour through the region aimed at solidifying the cease-fire that ended the monthlong conflict between Israeli forces and Hezbollah fighters in Lebanon. The United Nations chief, who arrived after touring war-battered southern Lebanon, met separately with Israeli Defense Minister Amir Peretz and the families of two Israeli soldiers whose abduction by Hezbollah on July 12 triggered the fighting.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 20, 2003
United Nations Secretary-General Kofi Annan has called on the U.S.-led forces in Iraq to set out a "clear timetable" for a staged withdrawal, pointing out that numerous Iraqis had told U.N. officials that "democracy should not be imposed from the outside." Although he welcomed last weekend's founding of the 25-member Governing Council for Iraq, Annan said in a report distributed to Security Council members Friday that "there is a pressing need to set out a clear and specific sequence of events leading to the end of the military occupation."
NEWS
November 21, 1990
Services for Richard C. Annan, retired head of shipping and inventory at the Western Electric Co. plant, will be held at 2 p.m. today at All Saints Episcopal Church, 203 Chatsworth Ave. in Reisterstown.Mr. Annan, who was 80 and lived on Worthington Hill Drive in Glyndon, died Monday at Good Samaritan Hospital after several strokes.He retired in 1972 after more than 30 years with the telephone equipment company, which no longer is in operation, on Broening Highway. Earlier, he worked for a stock brokerage firm in Baltimore.
NEWS
May 14, 2004
Hume Opie Annan Jr., a retired vice president of Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Maryland, died of cancer May 7 at Sacred Heart Hospital in Cumberland. He was 77 and a resident of Fort Ashby, W.Va., and formerly lived in Loch Raven Village. He was born in Tampa, Fla., and raised in Cumberland, and he worked his studies at Princeton University around merchant marine service in World War II. He graduated from the school in 1949 and was elected to the Phi Beta Kappa honors fraternity. After serving in the Army from 1950 to 1952, he moved to Baltimore and became vice president of corporate planning and research for Blue Cross and Blue Shield.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 2, 2004
EL FASHER, Sudan - There were only donkeys milling around in a soggy, trash-strewn lot yesterday afternoon when the United Nations secretary-general, Kofi Annan, and his entourage arrived at what was supposed to be a crowded squatter camp here in the troubled Darfur region of Sudan. Gone were the more than 1,000 residents of the Meshtel settlement. Gone as well were their makeshift dwellings. Hours before Annan's arrival, the local authorities had loaded the camp's inhabitants aboard trucks and moved them.
NEWS
By Borzou Daragahi and Borzou Daragahi,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 29, 2006
BEIRUT, Lebanon -- United Nations Secretary-General Kofi Annan demanded yesterday the release of two Israeli soldiers held by the Hezbollah militia, and ordered Israel to lift its blockade on Lebanon. Annan's sharply worded remarks came during a visit to Lebanon aimed at shoring up a U.N. Security Council cease-fire resolution adopted two weeks ago in an effort to end more than a month of fighting between Israel and Hezbollah. "It's a fixed menu," Annan said in response to complaints from both Israel and Hezbollah that their adversary was not complying fully with the resolution.
NEWS
By Maggie Farley and Maggie Farley,LOS ANGLES TIMES | December 31, 2006
UNITED NATIONS -- Secretary-General Kofi Annan says that he will keep working right up until midnight today, when his 10-year tenure as the world's top diplomat officially ends. But he has begun reflecting on his achievements, frustrations and failures as a leader who embodies the world's ideals, and as a man who often could not escape his limitations to make them a reality. Although sometimes it is debated whether Annan, 68, was more "secretary" or "general," he was more of an idealist than either.
NEWS
By Maggie Farley and Maggie Farley,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 15, 2006
UNITED NATIONS -- Ban Ki Moon of South Korea took the oath of office yesterday as the U.N.'s eighth secretary-general. Ban, 62, pledged that after he officially assumes office Jan. 1, he would try to restore trust in the institution tainted by scandal and management lapses, and to bridge divisions between rich and poor nations. "I look forward with a mixture of awe and enthusiasm to taking up my duties as secretary-general of the United Nations," the former foreign minister said after being sworn in yesterday morning.
NEWS
By Edmund Sanders and Edmund Sanders,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 16, 2006
NAIROBI, KENYA -- Frustrated in its attempts to deploy peacekeeping troops to Sudan's troubled Darfur region, the United Nations is considering sending forces to neighboring Chad instead, Secretary-General Kofi Annan said yesterday. "We are looking at the possibility of putting observers or some international presence on the border and working with the government of Chad," Annan said in Nairobi, where he was attending a summit on climate change. Annan said such a presence would reduce cross-border incursions into Chad and protect the estimated 200,000 Darfur refugees who have fled violence in western Sudan and live in camps in Chad.
NEWS
By James Gerstenzang and Maggie Farley and James Gerstenzang and Maggie Farley,LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 12, 2006
WASHINGTON -- President Bush reiterated yesterday that the United States was not prepared to hold one-on-one talks with North Korea over its nuclear program, even as U.N. Secretary-General Kofi Annan urged him to hold such bilateral negotiations. Bush also reaffirmed his three-year-old stance that the United States would not tolerate a nuclear-armed North Korea but said he was not considering military action and emphasized that his focus was on using diplomacy - through multination talks - to achieve Washington's aims.
NEWS
By Peter Spiegel and Laura King and Peter Spiegel and Laura King,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 31, 2006
WASHINGTON -- New postwar intelligence indicates that the militant group Hezbollah had broader access to sophisticated weaponry than was publicly known - including large numbers of medium-range rockets made in Syria, according to U.S. and Israeli officials and military analysts. The size of the Hezbollah arsenal and the direct role of Syria in supplying it will complicate the task of keeping Hezbollah from fully rearming, the officials said. Before the war, Hezbollah's access to weapons supplied by Iran and shipped through other countries was well-documented.
NEWS
By Ken Ellingwood and Megan K. Stack and Ken Ellingwood and Megan K. Stack,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 30, 2006
JERUSALEM -- U.N. Secretary-General Kofi Annan arrived yesterday for talks with Israeli leaders after calling again for an end to Israel's blockade of Lebanon and the release of two captured Israeli soldiers. Annan's visit is part of an 11-day tour through the region aimed at solidifying the cease-fire that ended the monthlong conflict between Israeli forces and Hezbollah fighters in Lebanon. The United Nations chief, who arrived after touring war-battered southern Lebanon, met separately with Israeli Defense Minister Amir Peretz and the families of two Israeli soldiers whose abduction by Hezbollah on July 12 triggered the fighting.
NEWS
By Peter Spiegel and Laura King and Peter Spiegel and Laura King,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 31, 2006
WASHINGTON -- New postwar intelligence indicates that the militant group Hezbollah had broader access to sophisticated weaponry than was publicly known - including large numbers of medium-range rockets made in Syria, according to U.S. and Israeli officials and military analysts. The size of the Hezbollah arsenal and the direct role of Syria in supplying it will complicate the task of keeping Hezbollah from fully rearming, the officials said. Before the war, Hezbollah's access to weapons supplied by Iran and shipped through other countries was well-documented.
NEWS
By Borzou Daragahi and Borzou Daragahi,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 29, 2006
BEIRUT, Lebanon -- United Nations Secretary-General Kofi Annan demanded yesterday the release of two Israeli soldiers held by the Hezbollah militia, and ordered Israel to lift its blockade on Lebanon. Annan's sharply worded remarks came during a visit to Lebanon aimed at shoring up a U.N. Security Council cease-fire resolution adopted two weeks ago in an effort to end more than a month of fighting between Israel and Hezbollah. "It's a fixed menu," Annan said in response to complaints from both Israel and Hezbollah that their adversary was not complying fully with the resolution.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | August 26, 2006
BRUSSELS, Belgium -- After a week of confusion and missteps, Europe pledged to add up to 6,900 troops to the U.N. peacekeeping force in southern Lebanon, officials said at an emergency meeting of European Union foreign ministers here yesterday. But the officials cautioned that the force would not be used to disarm Hezbollah. That job, if it is done at all, will be left to the Lebanese government and army. The international force, joined by Lebanese national soldiers, is the solution that world powers agreed to after a month of fighting between Israel and Hezbollah, an Islamist militia that dominates southern Lebanon.
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