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Annabella Sciorra

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By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | January 10, 1992
One of the now-vanished staples of the old B movies was the "vs." film. "Earth vs. the Flying Saucers" is probably the genre's tacky masterpiece, but who can forget Mamie Van Doren's "The Navy vs. the Night Monsters" or the immortal "Billy the Kid vs Now along comes "The Hand That Rocks the Cradle," which is a classic "vs." movie, except that the monster doesn't ride a big Frisbee or arise in slimy, gooey splendor from the depths of the sea or suck necks. She dresses in Villager clothes; she's a yuppie from hell.
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By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | October 2, 1998
Heaven in "What Dreams May Come" looks like the ultimate metaphysical fantasy of Hollywood moguls: Godless, awash in the good vibes of the New Age, and completely subject to the individual wills of its inhabitants.When souls first arrive, they can envision what they want their own particular heaven to be; they may also be reborn, but only if they choose to be. Away with such concepts as discipline, sacrifice and the transcendence of worldly illusions of power -- no one here sins, they just violate the "natural order," a spiritual transgression roughly on a par with failing to recycle.
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By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | August 10, 1992
For sheer kitsch ludicrousness, nothing can beat the climax of "Whispers in the Dark," a creepy, twisty, overdone thriller that dissolves before your very eyes. In fact I yearn to describe it, in all its grandeur and folly, to make its preposterousness dance before your eyes. But of course I can't -- not and play fair, that is.So trust me: It's a lulu.As for the movie that proceeds this bonfire of inanity, however, it's not a lulu. It's not even an Annabella, even though Annabella Sciorra, a very fine actress, holds it together on the sheer power of her talent and brains with no help from director-writer Christopher Crowe.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | November 10, 1995
"The Addiction," which opens today at the Charles, is not for everyone. In fact, it might not even be for anyone. Naturally, I thought it was terrific.Directed by that worst of all bad boys, Abel Ferrara, it's a work of philosophical speculation disguised as a vampire movie. It boasts an abundance of both ideas and blood. It joins that small, distinguished group of tough movies that argue concepts over character: "The Hit," Stephen Frears' intellectual gangster picture, was one such, and Ferrara's own "The Bad Lieutenant" was another.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | May 1, 1993
"The Night We Never Met" is yet another New York apartment-rental comedy. Alas, it won't play for you at all if you live in that great Gobi that stretches from the Hudson westward, northward and southward.The piece has to do with an exquisite rent-controlled apartment in Greenwich Village -- exquisite, that is, by New York standards. To me it was strictly a case of ONE RM, NO VU, DIRTY, UNSAFE, REALLY EXPENSIVE.Anyway, it is rented by a moronic young stockbroker (Kevin Anderson) who essentially uses it as a sin crib.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | October 15, 1993
Enough with the Italian families already!What we have here, by accidents of scheduling, is the arrival of two oh-those-nutty-Italians pictures, with extended, rambunctious families, dominating grandmas, gruff card-playing grandpas, lots of pasta and vino, lots of vaguely hostile bolts of intergenerational vitriol hurled across the age line, a slightly twisted younger set trying to find its way and one prominent non-Italian trying to pass.Moreover there's almost an interpenetration of casts.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | June 7, 1991
'Jungle Fever'Starring Wesley Snipes and Annabella Sciorra.Directed by Spike Lee.Released by Universal.Rated R.*** 1/22 Give this to Spike Lee: He sees everything.In his private life he may be a strident polemicist, a hustling millionaire gym shoe salesman and a loudmouthed whiner who blames everything on "the problem" -- racism -- but behind the camera he's an artist, with an artist's vision and compassion.In his new "Jungle Fever," he sees the pain and hope of interracial love, the despair of drugs, the stifling crunch of orthodoxy, the tragedy of broken communications.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | October 2, 1998
Heaven in "What Dreams May Come" looks like the ultimate metaphysical fantasy of Hollywood moguls: Godless, awash in the good vibes of the New Age, and completely subject to the individual wills of its inhabitants.When souls first arrive, they can envision what they want their own particular heaven to be; they may also be reborn, but only if they choose to be. Away with such concepts as discipline, sacrifice and the transcendence of worldly illusions of power -- no one here sins, they just violate the "natural order," a spiritual transgression roughly on a par with failing to recycle.
FEATURES
By Judy Gerstel and Judy Gerstel,Knight-Ridder News Service | August 11, 1992
New York-- "Skee-ora. See-ora. Skiroka. Scorsese. Somebody came up to me the other day and said, 'You're Annabella Scorsese!' "The name may not come easily, but the face is certainly familiar.Annabella Sciorra (that's Shee-ora) is blessed with the dark, intelligent looks that make audiences take her seriously and make them very upset when she's not treated properly on screen.That seems to happen rather often these days.Earlier this year, in "The Hand That Rocks the Cradle," Ms. Sciorra played a young mother sexually abused by a gynecologist and then victimized by a crazed nanny who first swipes her asthma medicine and then attempts to swipe her husband and baby.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | April 21, 1995
As a melancholy icon for our troubled times, nothing could top "The Cure." It's a modern version of "Huck Finn," with Tom and Huck riding the raft down the Mississippi, except this time Tom has AIDS.Of course it shouldn't be judged as an icon, but as a movie. In that regard, it's somewhat flawed. Essentially a "feelings" kind of piece, it follows as two 11-year-old neighbors awkwardly meet and bond, even though the smaller of them is fatally infected with the virus. Soon the boys are determined to find a cure for the disease and try a number of goofy natural remedies.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | April 21, 1995
As a melancholy icon for our troubled times, nothing could top "The Cure." It's a modern version of "Huck Finn," with Tom and Huck riding the raft down the Mississippi, except this time Tom has AIDS.Of course it shouldn't be judged as an icon, but as a movie. In that regard, it's somewhat flawed. Essentially a "feelings" kind of piece, it follows as two 11-year-old neighbors awkwardly meet and bond, even though the smaller of them is fatally infected with the virus. Soon the boys are determined to find a cure for the disease and try a number of goofy natural remedies.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | April 22, 1994
Some months ago I received a letter from a man who shall go nameless, telling me that he was sure I was right about a particularly loathsome movie called "The Real McCoy" (Kim Basinger as a bank robber) but that he would see it anyway."You see," Mr. ---- confided, with what must have been a nervous little giggle, "I simply adore Strong Woman films!"Well, Mr. ----, have I got a movie for you!Mr. ----, meet Mona Demarkov. Mona, don't you think Mr. ---- could use some discipline? Possibly it would do to tie him up, knock out his teeth and shoot off his toes?
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | October 15, 1993
Enough with the Italian families already!What we have here, by accidents of scheduling, is the arrival of two oh-those-nutty-Italians pictures, with extended, rambunctious families, dominating grandmas, gruff card-playing grandpas, lots of pasta and vino, lots of vaguely hostile bolts of intergenerational vitriol hurled across the age line, a slightly twisted younger set trying to find its way and one prominent non-Italian trying to pass.Moreover there's almost an interpenetration of casts.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | May 1, 1993
"The Night We Never Met" is yet another New York apartment-rental comedy. Alas, it won't play for you at all if you live in that great Gobi that stretches from the Hudson westward, northward and southward.The piece has to do with an exquisite rent-controlled apartment in Greenwich Village -- exquisite, that is, by New York standards. To me it was strictly a case of ONE RM, NO VU, DIRTY, UNSAFE, REALLY EXPENSIVE.Anyway, it is rented by a moronic young stockbroker (Kevin Anderson) who essentially uses it as a sin crib.
FEATURES
By Judy Gerstel and Judy Gerstel,Knight-Ridder News Service | August 11, 1992
New York-- "Skee-ora. See-ora. Skiroka. Scorsese. Somebody came up to me the other day and said, 'You're Annabella Scorsese!' "The name may not come easily, but the face is certainly familiar.Annabella Sciorra (that's Shee-ora) is blessed with the dark, intelligent looks that make audiences take her seriously and make them very upset when she's not treated properly on screen.That seems to happen rather often these days.Earlier this year, in "The Hand That Rocks the Cradle," Ms. Sciorra played a young mother sexually abused by a gynecologist and then victimized by a crazed nanny who first swipes her asthma medicine and then attempts to swipe her husband and baby.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | August 10, 1992
For sheer kitsch ludicrousness, nothing can beat the climax of "Whispers in the Dark," a creepy, twisty, overdone thriller that dissolves before your very eyes. In fact I yearn to describe it, in all its grandeur and folly, to make its preposterousness dance before your eyes. But of course I can't -- not and play fair, that is.So trust me: It's a lulu.As for the movie that proceeds this bonfire of inanity, however, it's not a lulu. It's not even an Annabella, even though Annabella Sciorra, a very fine actress, holds it together on the sheer power of her talent and brains with no help from director-writer Christopher Crowe.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | August 7, 1992
For sheer kitsch ludicrousness, nothing can beat the climax of "Whispers in the Dark," a creepy, twisty, overdone thriller that dissolves before your very eyes. In fact I yearn to describe it, in all its grandeur and folly, to make its preposterousne So trust me: It's a lulu.As for the movie that proceeds this bonfire of inanity, however, it's not a lulu. It's not even an Annabella, even though Annabella Sciorra, a very fine actress, holds it together on the sheer power of her talent and brains with no help from director-writer Christopher Crowe.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | April 22, 1994
Some months ago I received a letter from a man who shall go nameless, telling me that he was sure I was right about a particularly loathsome movie called "The Real McCoy" (Kim Basinger as a bank robber) but that he would see it anyway."You see," Mr. ---- confided, with what must have been a nervous little giggle, "I simply adore Strong Woman films!"Well, Mr. ----, have I got a movie for you!Mr. ----, meet Mona Demarkov. Mona, don't you think Mr. ---- could use some discipline? Possibly it would do to tie him up, knock out his teeth and shoot off his toes?
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | August 7, 1992
For sheer kitsch ludicrousness, nothing can beat the climax of "Whispers in the Dark," a creepy, twisty, overdone thriller that dissolves before your very eyes. In fact I yearn to describe it, in all its grandeur and folly, to make its preposterousne So trust me: It's a lulu.As for the movie that proceeds this bonfire of inanity, however, it's not a lulu. It's not even an Annabella, even though Annabella Sciorra, a very fine actress, holds it together on the sheer power of her talent and brains with no help from director-writer Christopher Crowe.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | July 5, 1992
Dan Quayle had it wrong. It's not that families have values. It's that families are valuable.That's at least the implication of a surprisingly persistent strain of melodrama, nasty yet always compelling, which has recently surfaced on American movie screens. In a whole series of films, the drama has been built out of what might be called the nightmare of usurpation, as if membership in a functional family was itself a prize worth fighting -- even killing -- for: The movies have watched as a beloved figure, a mom or a dad, has been the target of a subtle campaign of replacement, designed to remove him or her either through death or exile, and implant the usurper in that place.
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