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By SUSAN REIMER and SUSAN REIMER,susan.reimer@baltsun.com | January 3, 2009
Amid stubborn rumors that she would soon be replaced, Anna Wintour, the legendary editor of Vogue magazine, was asked, while sitting on a journalism panel, what it would take for her to quit the business. Wintour answered that her journalist father told her she would know when it was time to quit when she became "too angry" to continue, by which I think she meant "frustrated," but it wasn't clear. But this was the rest of her answer: "The day I get too angry is the day I take up gardening."
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By John-John Williams IV and The Baltimore Sun | October 8, 2014
Aya Dixon, 15, has dreams of working for a top design house before eventually branching off to create her own line of couture. Up until now, her only brush with that industry was thumbing through glossy magazines or watching reality shows on television. That changed Wednesday when the Baltimore Design School sophomore got a chance to mingle with the likes of Anna Wintour, popular designer and "Project Runway" judge Zac Posen and other big names in the fashion industry. Dixon was part of a group of 10 students from Baltimore Design School who attended the White House's first Fashion Education Workshop, led by first lady Michelle Obama.
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FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | September 11, 2009
In "The September Issue," Anna Wintour, the high priestess of high fashion and longtime editor of Vogue magazine, never lets her colleagues see her perspire - and never reveals a spontaneous thought or emotion, or a fascinating one, either. Wintour granted director R.J. Cutler unprecedented access to her editorial processes for this documentary chronicle of her drive to break advertising records with her September 2007 issue. Unfortunately, the teapot tempests Cutler comes away with are neither gripping nor revelatory.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Ronnie Scheib, Variety | April 1, 2011
Obsessed with how people dress, New York Times photographer Bill Cunningham unfailingly dons the same shapeless jacket; a chronicler of ritzy charity events, the octogenarian tools around Manhattan on a bike. Cunningham's two weekly spreads in the Sunday Style section form complementary opposites: "On the Street" features everyday Gothamites decked out in eclectic fashion statements, while "Evening Hours" captures the rich clad in haute couture. Whatever the Times-produced, TV-ready tribute, "Bill Cunningham New York," lacks in tension is amply compensated by the pleasure of watching an enthusiast ply the craft he loves.
FEATURES
By Vida Roberts and Vida Roberts,Staff Writer | September 3, 1992
It's a battle of the heavyweights. The September fashion magazines, traditionally the year's thickest in ads and stylish editorial content, have weighed in. They're the lazy end-of-summer dream books that give women a fashion rush which is intended to drive them into a fall shopping frenzy.Vogue, Elle, Bazaar and Mirabella -- in that order -- are the leaders, but the big competition this month is between Vogue editor Anna Wintour and new Harper's Bazaar editor Liz Tilberis, both imported from Britain to beef up American magazines.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Ronnie Scheib, Variety | April 1, 2011
Obsessed with how people dress, New York Times photographer Bill Cunningham unfailingly dons the same shapeless jacket; a chronicler of ritzy charity events, the octogenarian tools around Manhattan on a bike. Cunningham's two weekly spreads in the Sunday Style section form complementary opposites: "On the Street" features everyday Gothamites decked out in eclectic fashion statements, while "Evening Hours" captures the rich clad in haute couture. Whatever the Times-produced, TV-ready tribute, "Bill Cunningham New York," lacks in tension is amply compensated by the pleasure of watching an enthusiast ply the craft he loves.
FEATURES
By Jean Marbella and Jean Marbella,Staff Writer | May 21, 1992
New York -- This is how British invasions work these days: Take over a room at chic Le Cirque for the night. Invite a mix of celebrities of the moment and powers-that-always-will-be from the media (Barbara Walters), entertainment (movie mogul Barry Diller) and that fuzzy place where people are famous for being famous (Ivana Trump). Call the paparazzi, pour the drinks and introduce to America . . .Susan Crosland.Who, if you're British, needs no introduction: She is the popular writer of racy novels (that everyone just knows are about personal pals like Henry Kissinger and Vanity Fair editor Tina Brown)
FEATURES
By Jean Marbella and Jean Marbella,Staff Writer | May 21, 1992
New York -- This is how British invasions work these days: Take over a room at chic Le Cirque for the night. Invite a mix of celebrities of the moment and powers-that-always-will-be from the media (Barbara Walters), entertainment (movie mogul Barry Diller) and that fuzzy place where people are famous for being famous (Ivana Trump). Call the paparazzi, pour the drinks and introduce to America . . .Susan Crosland.Who, if you're British, needs no introduction: She is the popular writer of racy novels (that everyone just knows are about personal pals like Henry Kissinger and Vanity Fair editor Tina Brown)
FEATURES
By John-John Williams IV and The Baltimore Sun | October 8, 2014
Aya Dixon, 15, has dreams of working for a top design house before eventually branching off to create her own line of couture. Up until now, her only brush with that industry was thumbing through glossy magazines or watching reality shows on television. That changed Wednesday when the Baltimore Design School sophomore got a chance to mingle with the likes of Anna Wintour, popular designer and "Project Runway" judge Zac Posen and other big names in the fashion industry. Dixon was part of a group of 10 students from Baltimore Design School who attended the White House's first Fashion Education Workshop, led by first lady Michelle Obama.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan | February 9, 2003
So you weren't invited to any Fashion Week shows in New York and the closest you've gotten to fashion editrix Anna Wintour is your monthly subscription to Vogue. Well, fear not, there are other ways to conjure the spirit of Fashion Week -- even if you are south of the cat(ty)walks. Between tonight and Thursday, Nick at Nite is showing fashion-related episodes from classic TV sitcoms like The Cosby Show, Cheers, Three's Company, All in the Family and Charles in Charge. There is the episode where Cosby's Clair hires a personal trainer (Debbie Allen)
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | September 11, 2009
In "The September Issue," Anna Wintour, the high priestess of high fashion and longtime editor of Vogue magazine, never lets her colleagues see her perspire - and never reveals a spontaneous thought or emotion, or a fascinating one, either. Wintour granted director R.J. Cutler unprecedented access to her editorial processes for this documentary chronicle of her drive to break advertising records with her September 2007 issue. Unfortunately, the teapot tempests Cutler comes away with are neither gripping nor revelatory.
NEWS
By SUSAN REIMER and SUSAN REIMER,susan.reimer@baltsun.com | January 3, 2009
Amid stubborn rumors that she would soon be replaced, Anna Wintour, the legendary editor of Vogue magazine, was asked, while sitting on a journalism panel, what it would take for her to quit the business. Wintour answered that her journalist father told her she would know when it was time to quit when she became "too angry" to continue, by which I think she meant "frustrated," but it wasn't clear. But this was the rest of her answer: "The day I get too angry is the day I take up gardening."
FEATURES
By Vida Roberts and Vida Roberts,Staff Writer | September 3, 1992
It's a battle of the heavyweights. The September fashion magazines, traditionally the year's thickest in ads and stylish editorial content, have weighed in. They're the lazy end-of-summer dream books that give women a fashion rush which is intended to drive them into a fall shopping frenzy.Vogue, Elle, Bazaar and Mirabella -- in that order -- are the leaders, but the big competition this month is between Vogue editor Anna Wintour and new Harper's Bazaar editor Liz Tilberis, both imported from Britain to beef up American magazines.
FEATURES
By Jean Marbella and Jean Marbella,Staff Writer | May 21, 1992
New York -- This is how British invasions work these days: Take over a room at chic Le Cirque for the night. Invite a mix of celebrities of the moment and powers-that-always-will-be from the media (Barbara Walters), entertainment (movie mogul Barry Diller) and that fuzzy place where people are famous for being famous (Ivana Trump). Call the paparazzi, pour the drinks and introduce to America . . .Susan Crosland.Who, if you're British, needs no introduction: She is the popular writer of racy novels (that everyone just knows are about personal pals like Henry Kissinger and Vanity Fair editor Tina Brown)
FEATURES
By Jean Marbella and Jean Marbella,Staff Writer | May 21, 1992
New York -- This is how British invasions work these days: Take over a room at chic Le Cirque for the night. Invite a mix of celebrities of the moment and powers-that-always-will-be from the media (Barbara Walters), entertainment (movie mogul Barry Diller) and that fuzzy place where people are famous for being famous (Ivana Trump). Call the paparazzi, pour the drinks and introduce to America . . .Susan Crosland.Who, if you're British, needs no introduction: She is the popular writer of racy novels (that everyone just knows are about personal pals like Henry Kissinger and Vanity Fair editor Tina Brown)
TRAVEL
May 3, 2011
'Alexander McQueen: Savage Beauty' exhibit in New York What: An exhibition celebrating Alexander McQueen's contributions to fashion and culture. The British designer, known for dressing the likes of Lady Gaga and Madonna with an edge, committed suicide last year at the age of 40. The display will feature about 100 examples of the designer's work from his 19-year career. Pieces will include signature designs such as the bumster trouser, the kimono jacket and the origami frock coat.
FEATURES
By N.Y. Times News Service | September 12, 1990
The new etiquette for men's handkerchiefs is one for blow, one for show and one to wear on top of your head.Men wearing bandanna handkerchiefs tied on the head, urban gyspy-style, are everywhere. Bruce Weber, the photographer, is well known for that practice, and not just for hacking around in the garden. He went hanky-on-top to Anna Wintour's little soiree at the Paramount Hotel in Manhattan last week.The bandanna is usually folded into a triangle, then pulled back over the skull and knotted in back.
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