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By Tamsin Todd and Tamsin Todd,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 25, 1998
"Black and Blue," by Anna Quindlen. Random House. 293 pages $22.Why does domestic abuse happen? What drives the cycle of love and hate, repulsion and dependence? Do people know how to stop it? These are questions Anna Quindlen asks in "Black and Blue," her new novel about domestic abuse. It's a splendid subject for a novel - complex, vivid and ageless.If only Anna Quindlen could pull it off. Instead, this intense portrait of an abused woman does little more than tell us what we already know - that domestic abuse is a very, very bad thing.
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NEWS
By Susan Reimer and Susan Reimer,susan.reimer@baltsun.com | June 1, 2009
Anna Quindlen, minus 50 IQ points." That was the verdict of the editors of Baltimore's City Paper not long after I started writing an opinion column for this newspaper. Anna Quindlen, minus 50 IQ points. It has been a lot of years, but it still stings. I was simply trying to do what Ms. Quindlen, then a New York Times op-ed page columnist, and Ellen Goodman of the Boston Globe were doing: taking their experiences as women, wives and mothers and telescoping it to reflect on the larger issues of the day. But I didn't need the City Paper to make me feel self-conscious.
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FEATURES
By Alice Steinbach and Alice Steinbach,Sun Staff Correspondent | May 14, 1995
Hoboken, N.J. -- Yes, she is warm and funny. Yes, she is smart and insightful. Yes, she is down-to-earth and real, confessional almost, a woman more than willing to dish on any subject that comes up: motherhood, success, romance, feminism, self-doubts, marriage and how much her husband likes short skirts and hates flannel nightgowns.And yes, Pulitzer Prize-winning columnist and best-selling novelist Anna Quindlen in person is just like Anna Quindlen in print: the kind of woman you'd like to have as your best friend.
NEWS
By Diane Scharper and Diane Scharper,Special to the Sun | September 3, 2006
Rise and Shine Anna Quindlen Random House / 269 pages / $24.95 As Anna Quindlen's novel Rise and Shine begins, Meghan Fitzmaurice, celebrated host of a morning talk show and noted for the perfect riposte, is about to destroy her reputation. Her guest, Ben Greenstreet, is explaining why he has left his wife of 18 years for the woman serving as surrogate parent of their baby. Worse, this woman has taken $20,000 from Mrs. Greenstreet to perform the service. "So you see this as commentary on the evils of surrogacy, and not as a case of a man leaving his wife for a woman fourteen years his junior," says Meghan, shortly before she pauses for a commercial break.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,Sun Staff | April 29, 2001
Before giving a speech to 500 people in Baltimore recently, the acclaimed writer Anna Quindlen reached for her cell phone and called her 12-year-old daughter, Maria, for a lively chat that ended with "I love you" and a promise to see her softball game the next day. Then she went out and held audience members' attention for more than an hour telling them, as the talk was titled, "How Reading Changed My Life," skipping freely from movable type inventor Johann...
NEWS
By Susan Reimer and Susan Reimer,susan.reimer@baltsun.com | June 1, 2009
Anna Quindlen, minus 50 IQ points." That was the verdict of the editors of Baltimore's City Paper not long after I started writing an opinion column for this newspaper. Anna Quindlen, minus 50 IQ points. It has been a lot of years, but it still stings. I was simply trying to do what Ms. Quindlen, then a New York Times op-ed page columnist, and Ellen Goodman of the Boston Globe were doing: taking their experiences as women, wives and mothers and telescoping it to reflect on the larger issues of the day. But I didn't need the City Paper to make me feel self-conscious.
FEATURES
By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,Staff Writer | April 5, 1993
I first began to understand the power of Anna Quindlen when I saw naked women reading one of her columns.It was October 1991, and the country was watching its favorite non-fiction soap opera, the Clarence Thomas-Anita Hill hearings. the women's locker room at a local gymnasium, someone posted a photocopy of Ms. Quindlen's latest column."Listen to us," the column began. "You will notice there is no 'please' in that sentence. It is difficult to feel polite, watching the white men of the United States Senate and realizing that their first response when confronted with a serious allegation of sexual harassment against a man nominated to the high court was to rush to judgment."
NEWS
By Susan Reimer | July 18, 1999
DID YOU HEAR? Anna Quindlen, the former New York Times columnist and Pulitzer Prize winner, has come out of retirement, where she wrote books that were made into movies while car-pooling her kids around, and she will write a twice-monthly column for Newsweek magazine.And I hate her.I am not proud of this. But I know you understand how I feel.She is everything you and I are not. Youthful (looking), talented, successful and a mother of three teen-agers who still manages to look put together by 8 a.m. on her day off.(I don't know that this last bit is true, but it would be so like her.)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Fran Wood and By Fran Wood,Special to the Sun | September 15, 2002
Blessings, by Anna Quindlen. Random House, 224 pages, $24.95. Had Anna Quindlen been inclined to subtitle her new novel, "The Odd Couple" would have been an apt choice -- couples don't come much odder than a wealthy octogenarian widow and her young ex-convict estate manager whose hearts are captured and healed by an abandoned infant. Then again, Quindlen could have subtitled it "Men Behaving Badly" -- because although male protagonist Skip is a wonderful guy, Blessings also details how a woman's life can be decimated by the men she cares about.
NEWS
By Russell Baker | January 3, 1991
NO MATTER what you may have heard, I am not sulky about being omitted from New York magazine's list of the treasures of New York City.This rumor was probably started by a busybody who eavesdropped on my conversation with David Halberstam during the opera intermission the other night at Lincoln Center.All I said to Halberstam was, "I was a little surprised that when New York magazine asked you to name one of the treasures of New York you named Jules Feiffer instead of me.""A little surprised" is all I said.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Fran Wood and By Fran Wood,Special to the Sun | September 15, 2002
Blessings, by Anna Quindlen. Random House, 224 pages, $24.95. Had Anna Quindlen been inclined to subtitle her new novel, "The Odd Couple" would have been an apt choice -- couples don't come much odder than a wealthy octogenarian widow and her young ex-convict estate manager whose hearts are captured and healed by an abandoned infant. Then again, Quindlen could have subtitled it "Men Behaving Badly" -- because although male protagonist Skip is a wonderful guy, Blessings also details how a woman's life can be decimated by the men she cares about.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,Sun Staff | April 29, 2001
Before giving a speech to 500 people in Baltimore recently, the acclaimed writer Anna Quindlen reached for her cell phone and called her 12-year-old daughter, Maria, for a lively chat that ended with "I love you" and a promise to see her softball game the next day. Then she went out and held audience members' attention for more than an hour telling them, as the talk was titled, "How Reading Changed My Life," skipping freely from movable type inventor Johann...
NEWS
By Susan Reimer | July 18, 1999
DID YOU HEAR? Anna Quindlen, the former New York Times columnist and Pulitzer Prize winner, has come out of retirement, where she wrote books that were made into movies while car-pooling her kids around, and she will write a twice-monthly column for Newsweek magazine.And I hate her.I am not proud of this. But I know you understand how I feel.She is everything you and I are not. Youthful (looking), talented, successful and a mother of three teen-agers who still manages to look put together by 8 a.m. on her day off.(I don't know that this last bit is true, but it would be so like her.)
NEWS
By Tamsin Todd and Tamsin Todd,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 25, 1998
"Black and Blue," by Anna Quindlen. Random House. 293 pages $22.Why does domestic abuse happen? What drives the cycle of love and hate, repulsion and dependence? Do people know how to stop it? These are questions Anna Quindlen asks in "Black and Blue," her new novel about domestic abuse. It's a splendid subject for a novel - complex, vivid and ageless.If only Anna Quindlen could pull it off. Instead, this intense portrait of an abused woman does little more than tell us what we already know - that domestic abuse is a very, very bad thing.
NEWS
By Jeffrey M. Landaw | December 10, 1995
JAMES RESTON would probably appreciate the fact that this is being drafted, slowly and painfully, on a portable manual typewriter.He was a good newspaper man to the last; when he died Wednesday night, he did it in time to make the home-delivery edition.When your job consists of grinding out a certain number of opinions every week over more than 30 years, it's difficult to see what, if anything, of your work will last longer than the issues that provoked it.As Joseph Epstein, the essayist and critic, wrote of Mr. Reston's older counterpart, Walter Lippmann, "Twenty years from now, if he is remembered at all, he will be remembered as a small part of the history of American journalism, another pundit, wrong much of the time, part of the contemporary noise of his day. Whether he knew it or not, Lippmann had made a bargain: he achieved great fame in his lifetime in exchange for the near certainty of obscurity in death."
FEATURES
By Alice Steinbach and Alice Steinbach,Sun Staff Correspondent | May 14, 1995
Hoboken, N.J. -- Yes, she is warm and funny. Yes, she is smart and insightful. Yes, she is down-to-earth and real, confessional almost, a woman more than willing to dish on any subject that comes up: motherhood, success, romance, feminism, self-doubts, marriage and how much her husband likes short skirts and hates flannel nightgowns.And yes, Pulitzer Prize-winning columnist and best-selling novelist Anna Quindlen in person is just like Anna Quindlen in print: the kind of woman you'd like to have as your best friend.
NEWS
By Diane Scharper and Diane Scharper,Special to the Sun | September 3, 2006
Rise and Shine Anna Quindlen Random House / 269 pages / $24.95 As Anna Quindlen's novel Rise and Shine begins, Meghan Fitzmaurice, celebrated host of a morning talk show and noted for the perfect riposte, is about to destroy her reputation. Her guest, Ben Greenstreet, is explaining why he has left his wife of 18 years for the woman serving as surrogate parent of their baby. Worse, this woman has taken $20,000 from Mrs. Greenstreet to perform the service. "So you see this as commentary on the evils of surrogacy, and not as a case of a man leaving his wife for a woman fourteen years his junior," says Meghan, shortly before she pauses for a commercial break.
NEWS
By Jeffrey M. Landaw | December 10, 1995
JAMES RESTON would probably appreciate the fact that this is being drafted, slowly and painfully, on a portable manual typewriter.He was a good newspaper man to the last; when he died Wednesday night, he did it in time to make the home-delivery edition.When your job consists of grinding out a certain number of opinions every week over more than 30 years, it's difficult to see what, if anything, of your work will last longer than the issues that provoked it.As Joseph Epstein, the essayist and critic, wrote of Mr. Reston's older counterpart, Walter Lippmann, "Twenty years from now, if he is remembered at all, he will be remembered as a small part of the history of American journalism, another pundit, wrong much of the time, part of the contemporary noise of his day. Whether he knew it or not, Lippmann had made a bargain: he achieved great fame in his lifetime in exchange for the near certainty of obscurity in death."
NEWS
November 3, 1994
No excuse for a feminist double standardColumnist Anna Quindlen ("Same old math," Oct. 25), letter writer Olivia Morris ("Unfaithfulness: A capital crime?" Oct. 21) and other bleeding-heart feminists don't like Judge Robert Cahill's sentencing Kenneth Peacock to "only" 18 months in jail for killing his wife after he found her in bed with another man.Isn't it funny that these same crybabies offered nocondemnation for the vicious act of mutilation Lorena Bobbitt performed on her husband?In fact, the only thing the feminists complained about was that Ms. Bobbitt had to serve a whole month for her crime.
FEATURES
By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,Staff Writer | April 5, 1993
I first began to understand the power of Anna Quindlen when I saw naked women reading one of her columns.It was October 1991, and the country was watching its favorite non-fiction soap opera, the Clarence Thomas-Anita Hill hearings. the women's locker room at a local gymnasium, someone posted a photocopy of Ms. Quindlen's latest column."Listen to us," the column began. "You will notice there is no 'please' in that sentence. It is difficult to feel polite, watching the white men of the United States Senate and realizing that their first response when confronted with a serious allegation of sexual harassment against a man nominated to the high court was to rush to judgment."
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