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Anna Nicole Smith

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By Carol J. Williams and Robin Abcarian and Carol J. Williams and Robin Abcarian,Los Angeles Times | February 9, 2007
HOLLYWOOD, Fla. -- Anna Nicole Smith had always made it clear: She wanted to be just like Marilyn Monroe. She struggled mightily to make herself into a platinum-tressed sex symbol. And though she never gained the acting credibility of Monroe, her death at 39 yesterday in a Florida hotel poignantly echoes that of her idol. Ms. Smith's rollercoaster life of fame, fortune, weight battles, legal entanglements and tragedy proved irresistible fodder for the chroniclers of pop culture - the tabloids, the entertainment TV shows, the blogs - that focused on her obsessively.
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FEATURES
March 2, 2007
Former Playboy Playmate Anna Nicole Smith will be buried beside her son today in a custom-made gown after an extravagant, private and "very pink" memorial service bringing together the three people battling for custody of her baby daughter. The memorial service at Mount Horeb Baptist Church, west of downtown Nassau, the Bahamas, will be "very pink" and "over the top," with up to 300 guests, a singer and gazillions of pink flowers, organizer Patrik Simpson told the Associated Press. The burial will be much more intimate, with about 30 people, he said.
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By Marego Athans and Marego Athans,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | October 4, 2000
HOUSTON - Now, from the land of rambling ranches, 10-gallon hats and 32-ounce steaks, comes a trial where everything is, well, really big. A buxom, 5-foot-11-inch former stripper and Playboy centerfold, widowed after a 14-month marriage to a 90-year-old oil billionaire, fights his two sons for half the fortune, worth about $1.2 billion. Two dozen lawyers prepare for 10-plus weeks of billable hours - and probably years of appeals. Can't get much more Texas than that. The real-life soap, which got under way in court this week, could make the girl who once cooked legs, breasts and wings at Jim's Krispy Fried Chicken in tiny Mexia, Texas, one of the richest women in America.
FEATURES
February 26, 2007
"Maybe he wants to be a movie star." Anna Nicole Smith's mother Virgie Arthur on the bizarre and blubbering antics of Circuit Judge Larry Seidlin.
FEATURES
February 26, 2007
"Maybe he wants to be a movie star." Anna Nicole Smith's mother Virgie Arthur on the bizarre and blubbering antics of Circuit Judge Larry Seidlin.
SPORTS
December 1, 2005
"If Joe Paterno were any more successful this season, Anna Nicole Smith would want to marry him." Michael Ventre MSNBC.com columnist "You can't sleep. You want to throw up. It's awful." Bart Bryant PGA Tour player, on the pressure of playing in the tour's Qualifying School tournament "From strictly a business standpoint, maybe it seems like a slam-dunk to stay here. But we're from New Orleans. Our homes were under water, and our friends are in dire straits. The last thing New Orleans needs to hear right now is that it's going to lose something else because of the storm."
NEWS
By NATION DIGEST | December 27, 2005
WASHINGTON -- Playboy playmate Anna Nicole Smith has an unusual bedfellow in the Supreme Court fight over her late husband's fortune. The Bush administration's top Supreme Court lawyer filed arguments on Smith's behalf and wants to take part when the case is argued before the justices. The court will decide early next year whether to let the U.S. solicitor general share time with Smith's attorney during the one-hour argument Feb. 28. Smith is trying to collect millions of dollars from the estate of J. Howard Marshall II, the oil tycoon she married in 1994 when he was 89 and she was a 26-year-old topless dancer in Houston.
FEATURES
March 2, 2007
Former Playboy Playmate Anna Nicole Smith will be buried beside her son today in a custom-made gown after an extravagant, private and "very pink" memorial service bringing together the three people battling for custody of her baby daughter. The memorial service at Mount Horeb Baptist Church, west of downtown Nassau, the Bahamas, will be "very pink" and "over the top," with up to 300 guests, a singer and gazillions of pink flowers, organizer Patrik Simpson told the Associated Press. The burial will be much more intimate, with about 30 people, he said.
NEWS
By DAVID G. SAVAGE and DAVID G. SAVAGE,LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 2, 2006
WASHINGTON -- Anna Nicole Smith, the former Playboy Playmate and widow of a Texas oil billionaire, won a unanimous ruling from the Supreme Court yesterday that clears the way for her to claim as much as $500 million from her late husband's estate. But the decision does not finally resolve the 11-year old legal dispute, which has bounced back and forth between the state courts of Texas and the federal courts in California. The court battle has been fought over who lied and schemed to get their share of the estate of J. Howard Marshall: his son or his widow.
NEWS
By From Sun news services | March 13, 2009
Phoenix confronts fan during hip-hop concert Joaquin Phoenix appears to be getting into the act of being a petulant hip-hop star. After making his audience wait for almost four hours, he gave a performance early yesterday morning at the LIV nightclub in Miami that was cut short when he jumped off the stage and confronted an audience member who was heckling him. Security guards dragged him back on stage and escorted him away. It's unknown whether the confrontation - and his pledge to quit acting and start rapping - was real or a put-on, but actor Casey Affleck recorded the performance on camera.
FEATURES
By Carol J. Williams and Robin Abcarian and Carol J. Williams and Robin Abcarian,Los Angeles Times | February 9, 2007
HOLLYWOOD, Fla. -- Anna Nicole Smith had always made it clear: She wanted to be just like Marilyn Monroe. She struggled mightily to make herself into a platinum-tressed sex symbol. And though she never gained the acting credibility of Monroe, her death at 39 yesterday in a Florida hotel poignantly echoes that of her idol. Ms. Smith's rollercoaster life of fame, fortune, weight battles, legal entanglements and tragedy proved irresistible fodder for the chroniclers of pop culture - the tabloids, the entertainment TV shows, the blogs - that focused on her obsessively.
NEWS
By DAVID G. SAVAGE and DAVID G. SAVAGE,LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 2, 2006
WASHINGTON -- Anna Nicole Smith, the former Playboy Playmate and widow of a Texas oil billionaire, won a unanimous ruling from the Supreme Court yesterday that clears the way for her to claim as much as $500 million from her late husband's estate. But the decision does not finally resolve the 11-year old legal dispute, which has bounced back and forth between the state courts of Texas and the federal courts in California. The court battle has been fought over who lied and schemed to get their share of the estate of J. Howard Marshall: his son or his widow.
NEWS
By NATION DIGEST | December 27, 2005
WASHINGTON -- Playboy playmate Anna Nicole Smith has an unusual bedfellow in the Supreme Court fight over her late husband's fortune. The Bush administration's top Supreme Court lawyer filed arguments on Smith's behalf and wants to take part when the case is argued before the justices. The court will decide early next year whether to let the U.S. solicitor general share time with Smith's attorney during the one-hour argument Feb. 28. Smith is trying to collect millions of dollars from the estate of J. Howard Marshall II, the oil tycoon she married in 1994 when he was 89 and she was a 26-year-old topless dancer in Houston.
SPORTS
December 1, 2005
"If Joe Paterno were any more successful this season, Anna Nicole Smith would want to marry him." Michael Ventre MSNBC.com columnist "You can't sleep. You want to throw up. It's awful." Bart Bryant PGA Tour player, on the pressure of playing in the tour's Qualifying School tournament "From strictly a business standpoint, maybe it seems like a slam-dunk to stay here. But we're from New Orleans. Our homes were under water, and our friends are in dire straits. The last thing New Orleans needs to hear right now is that it's going to lose something else because of the storm."
NEWS
By Marego Athans and Marego Athans,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | October 4, 2000
HOUSTON - Now, from the land of rambling ranches, 10-gallon hats and 32-ounce steaks, comes a trial where everything is, well, really big. A buxom, 5-foot-11-inch former stripper and Playboy centerfold, widowed after a 14-month marriage to a 90-year-old oil billionaire, fights his two sons for half the fortune, worth about $1.2 billion. Two dozen lawyers prepare for 10-plus weeks of billable hours - and probably years of appeals. Can't get much more Texas than that. The real-life soap, which got under way in court this week, could make the girl who once cooked legs, breasts and wings at Jim's Krispy Fried Chicken in tiny Mexia, Texas, one of the richest women in America.
NEWS
March 1, 2007
Wash your hands before you eat. It's a directive practically everybody heard growing up, at home and at school. It's obviously important for good hygiene. But do we really need a law mandating it? State Rep. Mary Flowers, that Democratic do-gooder from Chicago, thinks so. She introduced House Bill 382, which requires the Chicago public schools to make students wash their hands with antiseptic soap before eating. (Don't downstate kids need the law held over their head to get them to wash, or doesn't Ms. Flowers care if germs make them sick?
SPORTS
October 2, 2005
Good morning --Ed Reed -- Not that we need to remind you, but Herman Edwards has a history of calling for the halfback option. Question of the day Which teams do you predict will meet in the World Series? Selected responses to today's question will be printed tomorrow on The Kickoff page. Please e-mail your answer (about 25 words) to sports@baltsun.com by 3 p.m. tomorrow. Include your name, address and a daytime telephone number for verification purposes. They said it "Priest prays over them, and I bury them."
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