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NEWS
February 19, 1993
Dear Ann Landers:Lighten up. Maybe after reading hundreds of thousands of letters from people with real problems, you've lost your sense of humor. That is the only conclusion we can draw from your deadly serious response about the humor contained in Western Maryland College's brochure about financial aid.How could anyone take seriously the brochure's tongue-in-cheek advice that the college's tuition and expenses ($19,580) be funded through a chain letter, by playing the school's telephone number in the Pick-Seven Lotto, or by opening a savings and loan?
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Susan Reimer and Susan Reimer,Sun Staff | November 2, 2003
When Eppie Lederer died June 22, 2002, she took "Ann Landers" with her. The legendary advice columnist had years earlier asked her only child, a journalist herself, if she would continue the column, and Margo Howard had declined. "I didn't want to work that hard," she confesses in A Life in Letters: Ann Landers' Letters to Her Only Child (Warner Books, 416 pages, $22). So, the name "Ann Landers," which Landers owned, was retired at her death, and, as was the case with Erma Bombeck, more than a byline is gone.
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NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron and Thomas W. Waldron,Staff Writer | February 16, 1993
Ann Landers doesn't have much of a sense of humor, Western Maryland College has discovered.The nationally syndicated advice columnist today criticizes the private college in Westminster for its whimsical advice to cash-strapped parents. In a financial aid brochure, the college suggests that parents play the lottery or send chain letters to help pay their children's tuition bills."Send a letter to 200 people promising them good luck if they return two bucks and send the letter to 10 of their friends," the Western Maryland brochure says.
FEATURES
August 5, 2002
Hundreds of votes were cast online. Scores more arrived by mail and e-mail. We got more advice on advice columnists than we imagined. The decision: Dear Abby, the venerable column once penned by Ann Landers' sister, and now by Ann's niece, will succeed Ann Landers as The Sun's daily advice column. For the Dear Abby column, it's a kind of homecoming. The column appeared in the morning Sun for many years before the paper merged with The Evening Sun several years ago. It is still the most widely syndicated column in the world, with about 90 million readers in more than 1,200 newspapers every day. The column was written from its beginning in 1956 by Pauline Phillips (left)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Susan Reimer and Susan Reimer,Sun Staff | November 2, 2003
When Eppie Lederer died June 22, 2002, she took "Ann Landers" with her. The legendary advice columnist had years earlier asked her only child, a journalist herself, if she would continue the column, and Margo Howard had declined. "I didn't want to work that hard," she confesses in A Life in Letters: Ann Landers' Letters to Her Only Child (Warner Books, 416 pages, $22). So, the name "Ann Landers," which Landers owned, was retired at her death, and, as was the case with Erma Bombeck, more than a byline is gone.
NEWS
By Patricia Meisol | September 26, 1990
It was the kind of book B. Dalton Booksellers didn't want to sell and Phil Donahue didn't want to talk about. Fifty publishers turned it down.But thanks to a mention last week by syndicated columnist Ann Landers, a self-help book about urinary incontinence has become an overnight best seller for the Johns Hopkins University Press.The Hopkins Press said Monday's mail brought 18,000 orders for the book, "Staying Dry, A Practical Guide to Bladder Control." Only last week, 3,000 copies of the book sat idly in storage.
FEATURES
By Mei-Ling Hopgood and Mei-Ling Hopgood,Knight-Ridder | August 16, 1991
It's a strange kind of best-seller. You can't buy it in a bookstore, though it has sold countless copies. You won't find any high-gloss, racy illustrations to explain its popularity, but the publication does quite well with a simple yellow-striped cardboard cover and a no-nonsense title: "Sex and the Teenager."Who wrote the book of love? Ann Landers.The 38-page booklet, even after 20 years in print, still draws requests whenever it's mentioned at the end of Landers' syndicated column.Sex, of course, is hardly a foreign topic for Landers.
FEATURES
March 9, 2002
More inside Ann Landers: For a daunting reality game show, try teaching. [Page 8d] Index Comics 6d..................Crossword 7d Movies 4d...................Television 5d Horoscope 8d...............Jumble 6d
FEATURES
March 16, 2002
More inside Ann Landers: A mom offers some rules that teachers should follow. [Page 4d] Index Comics 6d Crossword 7d Movies 4d Television 5d SunSpot The Sun on the Internet: http://www.sunspot.net
NEWS
July 28, 2002
Today is a new day in The Sun -- the first in many years without Ann Landers' daily advice column. Landers passed away June 22, and her final newspaper column appeared in yesterday's editions. We are considering several possible successors to Landers, including the column that appears on page 4 today: Annie's Mailbox, compiled by two writers who had worked closely with her. Over the next week in the daily Today section and Sunday's Home & Family section, we will publish a variety of advice columns.
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | June 27, 2002
BOSTON - What then should be her epitaph? What final handle should we choose for the woman who was our adviser-in-chief? Sensible from Sioux City? Eppie Lederer died on Saturday, taking Ann Landers with her. The two were, after all, inseparable. For nearly half a century, Lederer/Landers made sense the way other people make cars or computer chips. Sense, however, was a much rarer product, harder to fashion and always in demand. In her newspaper office, in her apartment, in her bathtub, Ms. Lederer answered letters one decade after another until cancer finally did what few editors dared - ended her column.
FEATURES
By Colleen Freyvogel and Tori Campion and Colleen Freyvogel and Tori Campion,SUN STAFF | June 25, 2002
"I will probably slump over at my typewriter when I am 90, and that will be it. At least that is the way I would like it to be." - Ann Landers, 1990 Venerable advice columnist Ann Landers didn't quite make it to age 90, dying Saturday at 83 from cancer. But the estimated 90 million readers who consult her column every day will still be able to get her advice - at least for another month. Landers, whose real name was Esther "Eppie" Lederer, penned her column a month in advance, so it will continue to run in The Sun and many other newspapers until July 27. Those columns will be the final chapters in Landers 40-year reign as the queen of advice columnists, a period in which her pithy responses on virtually any subject imaginable grew to be the most widely syndicated column in the world, appearing in more than 1,200 newspapers.
FEATURES
March 16, 2002
More inside Ann Landers: A mom offers some rules that teachers should follow. [Page 4d] Index Comics 6d Crossword 7d Movies 4d Television 5d SunSpot The Sun on the Internet: http://www.sunspot.net
FEATURES
March 9, 2002
More inside Ann Landers: For a daunting reality game show, try teaching. [Page 8d] Index Comics 6d..................Crossword 7d Movies 4d...................Television 5d Horoscope 8d...............Jumble 6d
NEWS
January 21, 1996
Engineering in public schools is old hatAnne Haddad should be lashed with a wet noodle (in the vernacular of Ann Landers) for her Dec. 26 article, "With an eye to the future, students in Carroll County focus on engineering." It is replete with inaccuracy.The first time engineering courses moved into the high schools in Maryland was in 1885 in Baltimore City, not Carroll County in 1995. Baltimore Polytechnic Institute had engineering courses and two-period laboratory classes way before Anne Haddad was a gleam in her parents' eyes.
NEWS
September 18, 1995
In the Today section, you'll find stylishly written, substantive cover stories, news from the arts, lifestyle and pop;ular culture - and a bigger-than-ever comics package spanning two full pages. Here's what to expect:ComicsThe new Today section combines the most popular comics from the morning and evening papers in a powerful lineup that features 37 strips, more than either paper had before and twice as many as appeared in The Sun.You'll find most of your favorites here, but space limitations made it impossible to keep every strip.
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