Advertisement
HomeCollectionsAnkara
IN THE NEWS

Ankara

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Amberin Zaman and Amberin Zaman,LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 10, 2004
ANKARA, Turkey - Four Kurdish activists were freed yesterday and state-run television launched its first Kurdish broadcast, moves calculated to boost Turkey's chances of launching membership talks with the European Union later this year. Hundreds of Kurds gathered outside Ankara's Ulucanlar prison and broke out in piercing ululations, mobbing the four former lawmakers - led by Leyla Zana, Turkey's most prominent Kurdish female politician - as they walked to freedom. An appeals court ordered them released pending a new trial.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Oz Bengur | June 6, 2013
As the Arab Spring unfolded in Egypt and other countries in the Middle East, Turkey was held out as a model for how Islam and democracy could co-exist. This week's massive civil unrest in Turkey, erupting over the destruction of the Gezi Park in Istanbul's center, raises the broader question of whether that model is viable. The response to the protests has been harsh. Police liberally used tear gas and water hoses in a counterproductive attempt to quell the unrest. Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan was dismissive of the protesters' demands and, showing his characteristic pugilism (he is a former boxer)
Advertisement
NEWS
By AMBERIN ZAMAN and AMBERIN ZAMAN,LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 17, 2006
ANKARA, Turkey -- A five-man delegation from the Islamic militant group Hamas headed by Syria-based political leader Khaled Mashaal arrived in the Turkish capital yesterday, provoking harsh criticism from Israel and concern from U.S. officials. "It is hard to understand why these people went to Turkey," Ranaan Gissin, a spokesman for the Israeli government, told a private Turkish news channel. "It is a serious mistake. This visit could have serious consequences for our links that could be hard to repair."
NEWS
By Larry Carson, The Baltimore Sun | June 23, 2011
Patching potholes and balancing Howard County's or Maryland's budget may seem far removed from visits to foreign and exotic places, but several local elected officials traveled overseas this spring, visiting places as diverse as Israel, Turkey, northern Europe and Asia. County Executive Ken Ulman, a Democrat, spent a week in Israel, and Del. Gail Bates, a Republican, made a similar trip to Turkey, both invited and financed, at least in part, by local groups with ties to those countries interested in building good relations with American officials.
NEWS
May 9, 2007
On May 7, 2007, KENNETH S. BERRY, age 63 passed peacefully. Ken was retired from teaching Mathematics at Edgewater and Catonsville High Schools and Robert College in Ankara, Turkey. Ken loved his adopted city of Baltimore, traveling, gardening and enjoying life with his many friends. He will be missed by all who knew him. Notice of a memorial service will be forthcoming.
NEWS
By Graham E. Fuller | October 22, 2007
Turkish-American relations are in crisis. But the House resolution declaring the World War I-era killings of Armenians a genocide is only one cause - and that's just a sideshow. Turkish-American relations have been deteriorating for years, and the root explanation is simple and harsh: Washington's policies are broadly and fundamentally incompatible with Turkish foreign policy interests in multiple arenas. No amount of diplomat-speak can conceal or change that reality. Count the ways: Kurds.
NEWS
April 19, 1995
"Linchpin" and "crossroads" are two labels often applied to Turkey since World War II. The crossroads between Europe and the Middle East, the intersection of western and Islamic civilizations. The linchpin of the chain of alliances surrounding the Soviet Union that was supposed to contain aggressive communism.The strains on Turkey's commitment to joining Europe as a full-fledged partner and to maintaining its western-style democracy are great enough for President Clinton to confer today with Prime Minister Tansu Ciller, passing through on a private visit.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 16, 1997
ANKARA, Turkey -- Thousands of Turks, most of them women, marched through the streets of Ankara yesterday in the first major public protest against the policies of the Islamic-led government.Marchers carried signs and chanted slogans condemning what they believe are efforts to move Turkey closer to the Shariah, the strict law of the Koran, which imposes many restrictions on women."Let Turkey shout 'Down with Shariah,' " they chanted. One banner proclaimed, "Women's Rights Are Human Rights," while another said simply, "Women Exist."
NEWS
December 8, 2002
WITH TIME running out before something dramatic happens in Iraq, Turkey's rookie government finds itself in a not-very-welcome front-row seat. Washington is massaging the new faces in Ankara to a fare-thee-well. The reform-minded, Islamic-rooted Justice and Development Party, which has just taken power, is being tugged in all directions at once. Less secular than its predecessors, the new government is nonetheless pushing hard to join the European Union. France and Germany are resisting.
NEWS
March 23, 1995
There is a crucial difference between trained terrorists and innocent refugees. Terrorists will vanish before a cumbersome military strike. Refugees will wait to be hit.The argument that Turkey was entitled to hurl 35,000 soldiers at terrorist camps maintained by the Kurdistan Workers Party (PKK) in Iraq misses that point. The raid was modeled on Israel's strikes at terrorist bases in Lebanon. But Turkey was seen to mobilize on the border. The incursion was no surprise. PKK propaganda holds that most of its guerrillas infiltrated back into Turkey before the blow struck.
NEWS
By Graham E. Fuller | October 22, 2007
Turkish-American relations are in crisis. But the House resolution declaring the World War I-era killings of Armenians a genocide is only one cause - and that's just a sideshow. Turkish-American relations have been deteriorating for years, and the root explanation is simple and harsh: Washington's policies are broadly and fundamentally incompatible with Turkish foreign policy interests in multiple arenas. No amount of diplomat-speak can conceal or change that reality. Count the ways: Kurds.
NEWS
May 9, 2007
On May 7, 2007, KENNETH S. BERRY, age 63 passed peacefully. Ken was retired from teaching Mathematics at Edgewater and Catonsville High Schools and Robert College in Ankara, Turkey. Ken loved his adopted city of Baltimore, traveling, gardening and enjoying life with his many friends. He will be missed by all who knew him. Notice of a memorial service will be forthcoming.
NEWS
By Tracy Wilkinson and Tracy Wilkinson,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 29, 2006
ANKARA, TURKEY -- Pope Benedict XVI set off on the most difficult journey of his papacy yesterday, lavishing his hosts in this predominantly Muslim country with friendly overtures and softening his long-standing opposition to Turkey's membership in the European Union. Hoping to soothe anger over what many Turks consider an anti-Islamic bias, the pope called for brotherhood and healthy dialogue with Muslims, and he repeatedly sketched the common ground shared by Islam and Christianity. "The best way forward is through dialogue between Christians and Muslims, based on truth and inspired by a sincere wish to know one another better," the pope said, "strengthening the bonds of affection between us in our common wish to live together in harmony, peace and mutual trust."
NEWS
By Tracy Wilkinson and Tracy Wilkinson,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 7, 2006
ANKARA, TURKEY -- They're calling it a train crash here, the seemingly inevitable collision between this huge Muslim nation and the Europe it has courted for years. Those gauging Turkey's once promising program of reforms aimed at modernizing its democracy and joining the European Union see a troubled landscape: Turkish writers, journalists and even a 93-year-old academic are hauled into court on charges they insulted their country. Military commanders known for staging coups in the past make veiled threats.
NEWS
By AMBERIN ZAMAN and AMBERIN ZAMAN,LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 17, 2006
ANKARA, Turkey -- A five-man delegation from the Islamic militant group Hamas headed by Syria-based political leader Khaled Mashaal arrived in the Turkish capital yesterday, provoking harsh criticism from Israel and concern from U.S. officials. "It is hard to understand why these people went to Turkey," Ranaan Gissin, a spokesman for the Israeli government, told a private Turkish news channel. "It is a serious mistake. This visit could have serious consequences for our links that could be hard to repair."
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 29, 2005
ISTANBUL, Turkey -- Under Secretary of State Karen P. Hughes, seeking common ground with leading women's rights advocates in Turkey, was confronted instead yesterday with denunciations of the war in Iraq and what the women said were American efforts to export democracy by force. It was the second straight day that Hughes found herself at odds with groups of women on her "public diplomacy" tour, aimed at improving the American image in the Middle East. On Tuesday, she told Saudi Arabian women she would support efforts to raise their status, but she was taken aback when some of them responded that Americans misunderstand their embrace of traditions.
NEWS
November 28, 1990
Samuel Noah Kramer, 93, a scholar whose greatest passion was poring over 4,000-year-old clay tablets that contained the world's first known written language, the ancient cuneiform script of the Sumerians, died Monday in Philadelphia. He had throat cancer. Mr. Kramer, a professor emeritus at the University of Pennsylvania, translated myths, prayers and proverbs that predate the Bible. He also was credited with discovering the world's oldest matrimonial vows, the first juvenile delinquent and the oldest known record of a murder trial -- the 3,800-year-old case of three men who were sentenced to death for the murder of a temple official in Sumer, which is now southern Iraq.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 29, 2005
ISTANBUL, Turkey -- Under Secretary of State Karen P. Hughes, seeking common ground with leading women's rights advocates in Turkey, was confronted instead yesterday with denunciations of the war in Iraq and what the women said were American efforts to export democracy by force. It was the second straight day that Hughes found herself at odds with groups of women on her "public diplomacy" tour, aimed at improving the American image in the Middle East. On Tuesday, she told Saudi Arabian women she would support efforts to raise their status, but she was taken aback when some of them responded that Americans misunderstand their embrace of traditions.
NEWS
By Amberin Zaman and Amberin Zaman,LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 10, 2004
ANKARA, Turkey - Four Kurdish activists were freed yesterday and state-run television launched its first Kurdish broadcast, moves calculated to boost Turkey's chances of launching membership talks with the European Union later this year. Hundreds of Kurds gathered outside Ankara's Ulucanlar prison and broke out in piercing ululations, mobbing the four former lawmakers - led by Leyla Zana, Turkey's most prominent Kurdish female politician - as they walked to freedom. An appeals court ordered them released pending a new trial.
NEWS
December 19, 2003
TURKISH CYPRIOTS favoring reunification with the Greek side of the divided Mediterranean island narrowly beat out their nationalist rivals in recent parliamentary elections, but their victory wasn't enough to win them a majority of seats. The import of the vote, however, was clear - Turkish Cypriots no longer want to live as second-class citizens in an economically depressed, internationally isolated enclave masquerading as an independent country. They want a peaceful end to their 40-year fight with their Greek neighbors.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.