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By Linell Smith and Linell Smith,Staff Writer | November 1, 1992
The Cannery Children's Activity Center at the Baltimore Museum of Industry has received the 1992 Dibner Award for Excellence in Museum Exhibits of the History of Technology and Culture from the Society for the History of Technology. The name of the museum was incorrect in the Arts Notes column in Sunday's Arts & Entertainment section.The Sun regrets the errors.Academy-Award winning actress Anjelica Huston will narratthe Acoustiguide audio tour for "Picture Perfect," the Baltimore Museum of Art's coming exhibition of treasures from the Museum of Modern Art.The show of 17 pieces features Van Gogh's "The Starry Night," Rousseau's "Sleeping Gypsy" and Chagall's "I and the Village."
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March 31, 2008
The pseudo-improvised reality series The Hills, as it plays out beyond MTV on tabloid covers, is back stronger than ever after a three-month hiatus. Last Monday's return averaged 4.8 million total viewers, a new high for the show. The Hills, set among young aspirants of the Hollywood Hills music and fashion industries, continues to track the emotional warfare between former best friends Lauren Conrad and Heidi Montag while delving more deeply into the twistedness, gaslighting and superficiality of the boyfriends who ensure that the tortured rivals treat each other like Crips and Bloods.
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June 5, 2006
Critic's Pick--A oceanographer hunts a shark that ate his partner in The Life Aquatic with Steve Zissou (6:50 p.m.-9 p.m., Starz), with Anjelica Huston, above.
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January 7, 2008
Critic's Pick -- A P.I. (Anjelica Huston, above) strikes up an unusual bargain with Allison in the season premiere of Medium (10 p.m., WBAL, Channel 11).
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | March 10, 2000
Mother, friend, protector -- Agnes Browne, a plucky Irish lass whose dead husband has left her to raise seven children on her own in the hardscrabble streets of Dublin, excels as all of those. Not that nothing ever goes wrong. Rather, nothing ever goes so wrong that it won't go right again with a little bit of patience. In the hands of a lesser actress, this superwoman/supermom/superpal could have become super-tiresome. But Huston is no lesser actress, and her Agnes Browne manages to seem human in spite of herself.
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By Knight-Ridder News Service | February 18, 1992
New Line Cinema has nabbed "The Player," Robert Altman's scathing black comedy about the movie business.Virtually every studio in Hollywood was bidding to distribute the independently financed picture, based on Michael Tolkin's novel and starring Tim Robbins as a hotshot studio executive who kills a struggling screenwriter -- and then seduces the screenwriter's girlfriend.According to Variety editor Peter Bart, writing in the current issue, "Hollywood's new favorite indoor sport is trying to figure out which industry figure each of the lead characters is modeled after.
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By Philip Wuntch and Philip Wuntch,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | May 9, 2003
Daddy Day Care makes a mess. For starters, the film miscalculates Eddie Murphy's appeal. Regardless of how sly or even malicious his humor could be, his best roles always had an underdog appeal. But as Charlie Hinton, the once-naughty actor seems obsessed with his niceness. Upscale and self-satisfied Charlie and sidekick Phil (Jeff Garlin of TV's Curb Your Enthusiasm) are laid off from their high-paying advertising jobs. With Charlie's wife Kim (Regina King) pursuing a successful law career, Charlie stays home with their 4-year-old son Ben (Khamani Griffin)
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By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | July 10, 1998
The question has been raised before in these very pages: Does the world really need another dysfunctional-family drama? While we're at it, does the world need another hyper-realistic contemporary drama, shot with edgy intensity, about a lowlife who finds redemption through the affection of another marginal character?The answer is usually no, but somehow the actor Vincent Gallo ("Palookaville"), who makes his writing-directing debut with "Buffalo 66," has succeeded in giving all of these cliches an unexpected sweetness, humor and cinematic style.
NEWS
March 20, 1994
* Mai Zetterling, 68, a Swedish-born director and actress who starred in films with Peter Sellers, Tyrone Power and Anjelica Huston, died March 15 in London of cancer. After working in a drug store and mail order firm, she tried acting, and, at 17 years old, joined the National Theater School in Stockholm. Her first film role was in "Frenzy," with a screenplay by then-unknown Ingmar Bergman. After her Hollywood period she turned to writing and directed a number of films in English and in Swedish.
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By Lou Cedrone | January 25, 1991
''The Grifters'' isn't much of a movie. It leaves you feeling adrift, slightly unsatisfied, but the performances are so good, so interesting, that you're likely to overlook the failings of the script.Stephen Frears directed. He's the Englishman who directed ''Dangerous Liaisons,'' which is similar in mood to the new film. As was the case with ''Liaisons,'' the characters in ''Grifters'' are all using each other, playing each other like off-key pianos.There are many grifters (con artists) in ''The Grifters,'' but the film concerns itself with three in particular, one of whom is Lili, a 40-year-old woman who makes her money at race tracks.
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | December 25, 2004
Agoofball takeoff on Jacques Cousteau, The Life Aquatic With Steve Zissou is like a junior high kid's parody of outdoor-celebrity decadence set at picturesque ports of call, on uncharted waters, and 20,000 leagues under the sea. It's the strangest comic misfire yet from Wes Anderson - a cult director whose last, land-based extravaganza, The Royal Tenenbaums (also starring Bill Murray), also went down better with Dramamine. Starting with the premiere of Zissou's latest documentary at a film festival, The Life Aquatic With Steve Zissou: Adventure No. 12: The Jaguar Shark (Part One)
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By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | February 14, 2004
The year is 1912, and two suffragettes are sitting in a Philadelphia coffee shop having a friendly argument about political strategy. One cites progress made in the national campaign. The other says, "What? Sixty-four years of begging, and women can now vote in nine states? How many years is that per state? ... You do the math." "Look," her friend says, warning her that such statements could cost them a promotion to the national office, "you want to be two girls on a corner soap box? Or, do you want to go to Washington and play with the big lads?"
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By Philip Wuntch and Philip Wuntch,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | May 9, 2003
Daddy Day Care makes a mess. For starters, the film miscalculates Eddie Murphy's appeal. Regardless of how sly or even malicious his humor could be, his best roles always had an underdog appeal. But as Charlie Hinton, the once-naughty actor seems obsessed with his niceness. Upscale and self-satisfied Charlie and sidekick Phil (Jeff Garlin of TV's Curb Your Enthusiasm) are laid off from their high-paying advertising jobs. With Charlie's wife Kim (Regina King) pursuing a successful law career, Charlie stays home with their 4-year-old son Ben (Khamani Griffin)
ENTERTAINMENT
July 11, 2002
`Charlotte Gray' PG-13 121 minutes ** Charlotte Gray (Warner, 2001) is a freeze-dried version of Sebastian Faulks' juicy novel about a passionate young Scotswoman who enlists with British intelligence and serves as a courier and go-between with the French Resistance during World War II. Director Gillian Armstrong works more like a concept artist than a dramatist. She doesn't just emphasize the theme that war is a nasty muddle. She subordinates everything else to that idea, including the heroine's two love interests: an RAF pilot (Rupert Penry-Jones)
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | March 10, 2000
Mother, friend, protector -- Agnes Browne, a plucky Irish lass whose dead husband has left her to raise seven children on her own in the hardscrabble streets of Dublin, excels as all of those. Not that nothing ever goes wrong. Rather, nothing ever goes so wrong that it won't go right again with a little bit of patience. In the hands of a lesser actress, this superwoman/supermom/superpal could have become super-tiresome. But Huston is no lesser actress, and her Agnes Browne manages to seem human in spite of herself.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | July 10, 1998
The question has been raised before in these very pages: Does the world really need another dysfunctional-family drama? While we're at it, does the world need another hyper-realistic contemporary drama, shot with edgy intensity, about a lowlife who finds redemption through the affection of another marginal character?The answer is usually no, but somehow the actor Vincent Gallo ("Palookaville"), who makes his writing-directing debut with "Buffalo 66," has succeeded in giving all of these cliches an unexpected sweetness, humor and cinematic style.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | December 25, 2004
Agoofball takeoff on Jacques Cousteau, The Life Aquatic With Steve Zissou is like a junior high kid's parody of outdoor-celebrity decadence set at picturesque ports of call, on uncharted waters, and 20,000 leagues under the sea. It's the strangest comic misfire yet from Wes Anderson - a cult director whose last, land-based extravaganza, The Royal Tenenbaums (also starring Bill Murray), also went down better with Dramamine. Starting with the premiere of Zissou's latest documentary at a film festival, The Life Aquatic With Steve Zissou: Adventure No. 12: The Jaguar Shark (Part One)
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | December 26, 1996
You have two choices today: you can either take back all those Christmas presents you don't want, or you can watch television. Tough choice, huh?"Hook" (8 p.m.-11 p.m., WMAR, Channel 2) -- Robin Williams is a grown-up Peter Pan, Dustin Hoffman is Captain Hook and Julia )) Roberts is Tinkerbell. The casting's better than the movie. ABC."Friends" (8 p.m.-8: 30 p.m., WBAL, Channel 11) -- Only Phoebe (Lisa Kudrow) could wind up thinking her stalker is a pretty cool guy. Also in this repeat from October: Chandler (Matthew Perry)
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