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John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore sun | February 2, 2012
I am deeply indebted to Kory Stamper of Merriam-Webster for the latest post at  harm-less drudg-ery , for a Latin tag that explains much.  Ms. Stamper tweeted one of those plain facts of lexicography the other day, one that I, too have remarked on, that irregardless , though scorned in formal written English, is nevertheless as word. And has been for some time. For merely stating a simple truth, she was inundated with comments of the YOUR A MORON variety.  Philosophically, she turned to the Latin tag that now gives me comfort:  Aliqua non possunt quin merdam moveare , “There are those who cannot help but stir the turd.” (I believe that responsible translation might permit an alternative monosyllable for turd .)
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NEWS
By Alison Knezevich and The Baltimore Sun | October 1, 2014
Baltimore County health officials say a rabid cat was found and captured near Delight Road in Reisterstown this week. The male cat, found Monday, is a gray, tiger-striped tabby, and officials say it may have had a limp while it was in the community. The health department is urging anyone who had direct exposure to the cat between Sept. 14-Sept. 28 to seek medical treatment and contact county health officials immediately. People can contact the health department at 410-887-6011 during the day, or at 410-832-7182 after 4:30 p.m. alisonk@baltsun.com twitter.com/aliknez
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AEGIS STAFF REPORT | March 19, 2012
New details have come to light regrading an incident in which animal control officers were sent to a home in the Street area Friday afternoon to remove several dogs and cats. A deputy from the Harford County Sheriff's Office was also dispatched to the property in the 2900 block of Lochary Road at the request of the county's animal control office, Monica Worrell, spokesperson for the sheriff's office confirmed Friday. "Animal control asked the Harford County Sheriff's Office to assist in serving a search and seizure warrant at a location on Lochary Road," Worrell said, explaining a single deputy was sent to provide assistance at 2:35 p.m. and was still at the scene at 5 p.m. Worrell said she could not discuss the contents of the warrant, except to say it was obtained by animal control.
NEWS
By Matthew Wellington and Robert S. Lawrence | October 1, 2014
Science tells us that the overuse of antibiotics is leading to "super bugs," bacteria that are increasingly difficult if not impossible to kill with antibiotics. The biggest users — and arguably abusers — of antibiotics are large-scale industrial farms. More than 70 percent of antibiotics are used on livestock and poultry, and at many facilities, antibiotics are fed to animals that aren't sick. This enables the animals to grow faster and lets them stay healthy despite cramped, confined quarters where bacteria abound.
EXPLORE
Letter to the Aegis | January 17, 2012
To the Editor: I don't understand what people have against the Humane Society, and what they do for the discarded animals that nobody wanted. What would they like folks to do for them other than try to find them good homes? This is in regard to the article in Wednesday Jan. 4, and the Rebels dog park. People from all over come go use this park because it's safe. It's grass, not dirt and mud. It is fenced, and everyone seems to have a great time...owners and dogs. There aren't many places folks can take their dogs that is basically worry free.
NEWS
February 3, 2012
It was with great sadness that I saw the photos in The Sun of hunters posing triumphantly next to the carcasses of the animals that they had shot and killed in Africa ("Africa calls adventurous hunters," Jan. 29). Included in the photos were a dead water buffalo, lion, nyala, oryx and elephant. Isn't there a way for people to derive enjoyment from these magnificent animals' existence without causing their often painful demise? In Africa, there are safaris that offer tourists the opportunity to photograph wildlife in preserves and parks in their natural habitat.
FEATURES
By Jill Rosen and The Baltimore Sun | October 5, 2011
No matter what your feels are about religion, it's hard not to be charmed by a blessing of the animals. This one happened this week at the the Cathedral of the Incarnation, part of the Episcopal Diocese of Maryland. Watch for little Butterscotch. I love him. (He was a good boy! He didn't bite the bishop!)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kit Waskom Pollard, For The Baltimore Sun | February 19, 2014
Even in frigid weather, Ginger Myers' pigs are happy. "As cold as it gets, the pigs are out there, snorting and playing like kids bundled up and running around," says the owner of Evermore Farm , a family-owned livestock and produce farm in Westminster. Myers is one of many farmers in the Baltimore area who believe that running a farm under the principles of "good stewardship" is the right approach for farmers, animals, consumers and the region as a whole. Myers defines good stewardship as "the ethic of doing the best management we can - that's what we're doing from birth to plate.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | October 2, 2012
Anne Arundel police and animal control officers have removed 40 animals from a Pasadena property whose owner was not meeting their basic needs for food and shelter. When officers served a warrant Thursday at the home in the 8000 block of Lockwood Road, they found animals that lacked food, water and appropriate shelter, police said. They removed two dogs, a cat, two turtles, seven birds, four chickens, a goat, a pig, a chinchilla, three snakes, 12 aquatic animals, three geese, a duck, a kinkajou or honey bear, and a tarantula.
NEWS
July 31, 2013
I saw the fine cowboys pictured praying before the rodeo in Carroll County ("In it for the bucks," July 27). Well, many of us are praying for the day when rodeos are recognized for what they are: the humiliation, terrorizing, hurting and killing of peaceful non-volunteer animals in the name of "entertainment" - all for the audience's viewing pleasure. That is sick. There are plenty of ways to have fun in life without exploiting animals. Please do not support rodeos or elect politicians who choose to ignore animal cruelty.
NEWS
October 1, 2014
I am all for the feral cats Let it be noted that I am not talking at all about the feral cat in the school, however ( "Feral cats pose a serious health threat to humans," Sept. 26). I do know that the American Bird Conservancy bitterly despises all feral cats and would willingly kill them all. The Department of Natural Resources in Maryland is also very antiquated in their concepts about these cats and would also kill them. I have worked with feral cats and kittens - rescuing them, getting them medical checkups, needed shots and gradually turning them into some of the kindest and most loving animals that I have ever known.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler and The Baltimore Sun | September 19, 2014
When Guy W. Willey Sr. was growing up, he hunted and ate Delmarva fox squirrels in the low-lying forests of the Eastern Shore, long before it was clear the giant cousins of the common gray squirrel were in danger of disappearing. He was "dirt poor," he recalled, and lots of folks did it back then. Now, at 83, he's been invited to Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge on Friday, when federal officials are expected to announce the squirrel has bounced back from the brink of extinction and is no longer in need of legal protection.
NEWS
ByJoe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | September 5, 2014
Officials at an animal rescue center in Harwood said Friday they are housing the feral cat that last week prompted closure of Richard Henry Lee Elmentary School in Glen Burnie. Anne Arundel County school officials had spotted the cat last Friday and, after failing to capture it, closed the school over concerns that students might be bitten or scratched. The cat was finally caught Sept. 2 by county animal control officials. On Friday, officials from Rude Ranch Animal Rescue in Harwood, a volunteer-based nonprofit, said animal rescue had brought the feline to its facility.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | August 22, 2014
Since Charles Darwin wrote "The Origin of Species" more than 150 years ago, it's been known that nature's selection creates some species and ends others. But researchers at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County suggest that another actor is responsible for driving wedges in animal populations to create new species - mothers themselves. A study published last month in the journal Ecology Letters suggests that female creatures' sexual preferences may launch an evolutionary process that can lead to the creation of new species.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | August 21, 2014
Using live pigs to train future doctors in surgery is unethical and unnecessary, members of a health and animal rights group said Thursday during a protest of the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. The Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine says Hopkins is one of four schools around the country that still use animals in training. About two dozen doctors and others held signs outside Johns Hopkins Hospital reading "Baltimore Deserves Better" and "End Animal Labs.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | August 13, 2014
If you don't mind indulging me, I want to remind you, as we labor over our editing, of the sheer pleasure in reading.  Barbara Pym, whose work Philip Larkn championed, was a writer whose work could stand up to comparison with Jane Austen's in its attention to the telling details of domestic life and its delicious understated irony.  Here, in a passage from Excellent Women , Mildred Lathbury, the narrator, is taken to meet Everard...
NEWS
May 18, 2010
After reading "The job that nobody talks about: Health department cuts would decrease city's animal services" (May 16) I was outraged with Baltimore City and the fact the are proposing yet another cut to animal control, which is already operating on a shoestring budget. As a volunteer at Baltimore Animal Rescue and Care Shelter (BARCS) for the last three years I have seen first hand the animal abuse that continues to go on in Baltimore City day in and day out, most of it never reported by the news.
NEWS
June 18, 2014
We mourn the passing of animal rights champion Casey Kasem ( "Casey Kasem, 'American Top 40' host, dies at 82," June 16). Many of Mr. Kasem's fans are aware of the radio host's dedicated work for the American-Arab Anti-Discrimination Committee, Israeli-Palestinian peace and nuclear disarmament. But Mr. Kasem was also a champion for the voiceless - the animals. For many years, he served as national chair of the Great American Meatout, seeking to abate this country's animal holocaust.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach The Baltimore Sun | August 8, 2014
Otakon is many things, all of them having to do with Japanese and East Asian popular culture. But most of all -- at least to outsiders -- it's all about the costumes. Check out the area around the convention center Friday morning, before the fan convention's 8:30 a.m. opening, and you'll see hundreds of people lined up outside, few of them wearing anything normal. The whole scene resembles an anime artist's sketchbook come to vivid life. Visit the Inner Harbor over the weekend, or hang around outside nearby Oriole Park at Camden Yards, and the selection of magical girls, evil spirits, ninja warriors, faeries and Pokemen on display feels almost otherworldly.
FEATURES
By Kim Fernandez, For The Baltimore Sun | August 6, 2014
The sixth annual Orioles Pet Calendar benefitting the Baltimore Animal Rescue and Care Shelter (BARCS) will go on sale August 12, and five players will be on-hand to sign calendars at the shelter that day. J.J. Hardy, Tommy Hunter, David Lough, Bud Norris, and Matt Wieters will visit BARCS from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. on August 12 to sign calendars bought that day. Those attending must buy their calendars on-site for autographs. There will be free parking at Lot D on the south side of M&T Bank Stadium.
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