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NEWS
February 14, 2001
The student: A. Michael Sheer, 17 School: Atholton High School Special achievement: Michael is the only Atholton High School student to be recognized as a National Merit semifinalist. Favorite subject: Drama Academic plans: He wants to attend the University of Maryland, College Park and major in animal science. How he describes himself: Humorous, random, multitalented Hobbies: He enjoys acting and volunteering at the National Aquarium in Baltimore and at animal hospitals. How receiving this honor will affect his future: "It's a wonderful thing to get and will help me get into the field of animal science."
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NEWS
By Jim Moran and Paul A. Locke | April 8, 2013
Many Americans would be surprised to learn that chimpanzees are still being used in biomedical research and that millions of other animals are utilized in consumer product and toxicity testing. Others may find a sense of security in knowing that this practice continues to provide information on which chemicals and products are deemed safe. The fact is that it doesn't have to be this way, and there are a number of public health, economic and animal welfare reasons to change our ways. The evolving process by which the U.S. regulates chemicals is important to every American household.
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NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | June 14, 2004
Mel and Dianne Blizzard have turned the loss of their only child into a legacy that carries on their son's love for farming. The couple established a scholarship fund in memory of Nathan A. Blizzard, who died in a car accident on his way to work at a dairy farm nearly seven years ago. He was 20. The fund has awarded nearly $20,000 in college scholarships to students pursuing careers in agriculture and animal science. The Blizzards will give three more students scholarships at the Carroll County 4-H Fair next month.
NEWS
By Arin Gencer | arin.gencer@baltsun.com | January 4, 2010
Hereford High School freshman Marshall Feinberg pulled on blue rubber gloves and began snipping at the slippery skin of a raw chicken wing. "Wish I was Edward Scissorhands right now," he said to lab partner Paul LaMonica, who held down the wing as he continued cutting. The students were starting a lab meant to give them an up-close look at animal muscles, tendons and bones, in a new animal science class. Baltimore County's Hereford High is one of four high schools in Maryland participating in a pilot that is also being tested in nine other states.
NEWS
By Amy L. Miller and Amy L. Miller,Sun Staff Writer | July 14, 1994
For Michael R. Bell, joining the Carroll County Extension Agency is another step in an 11-year teaching career."I'm trying to bring new information to the dairy industry in this county," said Mr. Bell, who began work as a county agricultural extension agent July 1.Mr. Bell, a former agricultural science teacher at Clatsop Community College in Oregon and at the University of Connecticut, most recently was director of the two-year agricultural technology program at Virginia Polytechnic Institute.
NEWS
By Arin Gencer | arin.gencer@baltsun.com | January 4, 2010
Hereford High School freshman Marshall Feinberg pulled on blue rubber gloves and began snipping at the slippery skin of a raw chicken wing. "Wish I was Edward Scissorhands right now," he said to lab partner Paul LaMonica, who held down the wing as he continued cutting. The students were starting a lab meant to give them an up-close look at animal muscles, tendons and bones, in a new animal science class. Baltimore County's Hereford High is one of four high schools in Maryland participating in a pilot that is also being tested in nine other states.
NEWS
By Arin Gencer | January 4, 2010
Hereford High School freshman Marshall Feinberg pulled on blue rubber gloves and began snipping at the slippery skin of a raw chicken wing. "Wish I was Edward Scissorhands right now," he said to lab partner Paul LaMonica, who held down the wing as he continued cutting. The students were starting a lab meant to give them an up-close look at animal muscles, tendons and bones, in a new animal science class. Baltimore County's Hereford High is one of four high schools in Maryland participating in a pilot that is also being tested in nine other states.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | June 14, 2004
Mel and Dianne Blizzard have turned the loss of their only child into a legacy that carries on their son's love for farming. The couple established a scholarship fund in memory of Nathan A. Blizzard, who died in a car accident on his way to work at a dairy farm nearly seven years ago. He was 20. The fund has awarded nearly $20,000 in college scholarships to students pursuing careers in agriculture and animal science. The Blizzards will give three more students scholarships at the Carroll County 4-H Fair next month.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Sun Reporter | March 22, 2007
High school cultivating farming's next generation With surgical scissors, a needle and thread, Jessica Meadows carefully sutured a cut on a replica of an animal limb. Stitch by stitch, she repaired the deep laceration, an exercise that consumed most of the 80-minute animal science class at North Harford High School. "It takes time, but it really isn't that hard once you get the hang of it," said Meadows, a senior who hopes learning the technique will further her plans to study veterinary science in college.
NEWS
By Cassandra A. Fortin and Cassandra A. Fortin,Special to The Sun | February 17, 2008
Agriculture is in Naomi Knight's blood. She was raised on a dairy farm in Frederick County, and she lives on a dairy farm with her husband in Airville, Pa. "When you are born into it, you just do it," Knight said. "You develop a deep love of agriculture, and preservation, of land and the environment." For decades, Knight has shared her passion for agriculture with her students at Harford Technical High School where she started an Agri-Business/ Animal Science program. She was recently recognized for her efforts when she was selected as one of six educators nationwide to receive the National Association of Agricultural Educators Outstanding Teacher Award, at the NAAE annual conference in Las Vegas.
NEWS
By Arin Gencer | January 4, 2010
Hereford High School freshman Marshall Feinberg pulled on blue rubber gloves and began snipping at the slippery skin of a raw chicken wing. "Wish I was Edward Scissorhands right now," he said to lab partner Paul LaMonica, who held down the wing as he continued cutting. The students were starting a lab meant to give them an up-close look at animal muscles, tendons and bones, in a new animal science class. Baltimore County's Hereford High is one of four high schools in Maryland participating in a pilot that is also being tested in nine other states.
NEWS
By Cassandra A. Fortin and Cassandra A. Fortin,Special to The Sun | February 17, 2008
Agriculture is in Naomi Knight's blood. She was raised on a dairy farm in Frederick County, and she lives on a dairy farm with her husband in Airville, Pa. "When you are born into it, you just do it," Knight said. "You develop a deep love of agriculture, and preservation, of land and the environment." For decades, Knight has shared her passion for agriculture with her students at Harford Technical High School where she started an Agri-Business/ Animal Science program. She was recently recognized for her efforts when she was selected as one of six educators nationwide to receive the National Association of Agricultural Educators Outstanding Teacher Award, at the NAAE annual conference in Las Vegas.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Sun Reporter | March 22, 2007
High school cultivating farming's next generation With surgical scissors, a needle and thread, Jessica Meadows carefully sutured a cut on a replica of an animal limb. Stitch by stitch, she repaired the deep laceration, an exercise that consumed most of the 80-minute animal science class at North Harford High School. "It takes time, but it really isn't that hard once you get the hang of it," said Meadows, a senior who hopes learning the technique will further her plans to study veterinary science in college.
NEWS
By LAURA CADIZ and LAURA CADIZ,SUN REPORTER | October 29, 2005
When clients visit Bob Bohan's Annapolis law office, his priorities soon become apparent. There's an 8-by-10-inch photo of his foxhound, Maddy, displayed prominently in a cherry wood frame at the edge of his desk. A much smaller photo of his wife, Barbara, is on the other side of the desk. So it should come as no surprise that Bohan is carving out a niche in the growing field known as animal law, advising his elderly, two-legged clients on issues involving their furred dependents. "As people are growing older and in some cases outliving children, I've seen a number of cases where the pets become the most important players in providing companionship," said Bohan.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | June 14, 2004
Mel and Dianne Blizzard have turned the loss of their only child into a legacy that carries on their son's love for farming. The couple established a scholarship fund in memory of Nathan A. Blizzard, who died in a car accident on his way to work at a dairy farm nearly seven years ago. He was 20. The fund has awarded nearly $20,000 in college scholarships to students pursuing careers in agriculture and animal science. The Blizzards will give three more students scholarships at the Carroll County 4-H Fair next month.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | June 14, 2004
Mel and Dianne Blizzard have turned the loss of their only child into a legacy that carries on their son's love for farming. The couple established a scholarship fund in memory of Nathan A. Blizzard, who died in a car accident on his way to work at a dairy farm nearly seven years ago. He was 20. The fund has awarded nearly $20,000 in college scholarships to students pursuing careers in agriculture and animal science. The Blizzards will give three more students scholarships at the Carroll County 4-H Fair next month.
NEWS
March 30, 1996
Edwin E. Goodwin, 70, animal science specialistEdwin E. Goodwin, a retired animal science specialist for the Cooperative Extension Service of the University of Maryland College Park, died Wednesday of an apparent heart attack while training a horse. He was 70.For 25 years, he was superintendent of the 4-H horse and pony show at the Maryland State Fair in Timonium. Mr. Goodwin retired from the university in 1989 and continued to be a consultant to the pleasure horse industry on national and state levels.
NEWS
February 14, 2001
The student: A. Michael Sheer, 17 School: Atholton High School Special achievement: Michael is the only Atholton High School student to be recognized as a National Merit semifinalist. Favorite subject: Drama Academic plans: He wants to attend the University of Maryland, College Park and major in animal science. How he describes himself: Humorous, random, multitalented Hobbies: He enjoys acting and volunteering at the National Aquarium in Baltimore and at animal hospitals. How receiving this honor will affect his future: "It's a wonderful thing to get and will help me get into the field of animal science."
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