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NEWS
June 2, 2014
As a peace activist who believes strongly in the First Amendment and as a proponent of animal rights, I really enjoyed reading Bruce Friedrich's commentary, "Everybody suffers when officers act like they're above the law" (May 29). Of particular interest was the Frederick Douglass quote: "To suppress free speech is a double wrong. It violates the rights of the hearer as well as those of the speaker. It is just as criminal to rob a man of his right to speak and hear as it would be to rob him of his money.
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NEWS
June 2, 2014
As a peace activist who believes strongly in the First Amendment and as a proponent of animal rights, I really enjoyed reading Bruce Friedrich's commentary, "Everybody suffers when officers act like they're above the law" (May 29). Of particular interest was the Frederick Douglass quote: "To suppress free speech is a double wrong. It violates the rights of the hearer as well as those of the speaker. It is just as criminal to rob a man of his right to speak and hear as it would be to rob him of his money.
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NEWS
March 23, 1997
Teaching kids about trapping animalsI am sure that many people share my sentiments after reading the March 2 story, "New generation of trappers in the hunt," whereby the Department of Natural Resources organized Junior Trapper Day to encourage children as young as 4 or 5 to trap and skin animals.The article repeatedly mentioned that trapping teaches a "respect for nature." True, a DNR biologist told the kids that they are obligated to the animals trapped so that the animals do not suffer.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 9, 2012
Ann M. Klingaman, a retired Baltimore County public school educator whose career spanned more than three decades, died Sunday of complications from a broken hip at Gilchrist Hospice in Columbia. The former longtime Catonsville resident was 88. The daughter of a West Baltimore pharmacist and a homemaker, Ann Rebecca Meeth was born in Baltimore and raised in Catonsville. She was a 1940 graduate of Catonsville High School and earned a bachelor's degree in 1944 from what was then Western Maryland College.
SPORTS
By Bradley Olson and Bradley Olson,Sun reporter | May 18, 2008
Linda Kelly became an enemy of horse racing more than 30 years ago. The Monkton resident was watching television July 6, 1975, along with 18 million other Americans, when the filly Ruffian suffered a catastrophic break of her right foreleg and was euthanized hours after a failed surgery. That race was supposed to mean something, she remembered. The "equine battle of the sexes" - in which Ruffian faced off against Foolish Pleasure, a 3-year-old colt who had won the Kentucky Derby that year - was supposed to mirror the classic tennis match in which Billie Jean King beat the braggart Bobby Riggs two years earlier.
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,Sun Staff Writer | February 6, 1994
Five animal rights' advocates, two dressed in pink pig suits, were arrested at Harborplace's Light Street pavilion yesterday, protesting against a store they say contributes to the cruel deaths of wild animals in the Hawaiian rain forest.Members of People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals shouted slogans, distributed literature and handcuffed themselves to the doors of the Nature Company, which sells science and environmental materials.They were protesting the store's support of the Nature %o Conservancy, an environmental group that the protesters contend uses wire snares to trap wild pigs on its rain forest lands in Hawaii.
NEWS
October 21, 1990
WOODBRIDGE, Va. (AP) -- Officials at Mason Neck Wildlife Refuge in Northern Virginia say a six-day bow hunt last week was held to trim the deer population, but animal-rights activists said it was a "veiled excuse" for recreational hunting."
NEWS
By McClatchy News Service | May 13, 1993
VALLEJO, Calif. -- Half a world away, four pseudorcas, or false killer whales, are penned along the shore of a small Japanese island.Officials with Marine World Africa USA say they saved the animals from certain death at the hands of Japanese fishermen and now want to use those mammals in a new exhibit at the Vallejo oceanarium.But animal-rights activists claim the park officials were participating in a black market of sorts -- buying the whales from fishermen who round up and slaughter the animals partly because they compete with their fleets for fish, but also to satisfy demand from the captive marine mammal industry.
NEWS
By Lou Ferrara and Lou Ferrara,Special to the Sun | February 28, 1992
An animal rights activist in a full-body, yellow-feathered chicken suit shoved a cream pie in the face of poultry magnate Frank Perdue today during a wild demonstration at a University of Maryland Board of Regents meeting in Baltimore.After a 10-minute chase around the University of Baltimore campus, police finally cornered the chicken impersonator and hauled her off to the Central District lockup, along with three other activists who interrupted the regents' meeting."Idiots are idiots, and that's all," said an upset Mr. Perdue after he had cleaned up and the meeting had resumed.
NEWS
By Rafael Alvarez | December 29, 1991
Animal rights defenders leapt from the stands of the Marine Mammal Pavilion in Baltimore's National Aquarium during a show yesterday afternoon to protest the holding of dolphins and whales in captivity but the disruption drew jeers and boos from the audience."
SPORTS
By Bradley Olson and Bradley Olson,Sun reporter | May 18, 2008
Linda Kelly became an enemy of horse racing more than 30 years ago. The Monkton resident was watching television July 6, 1975, along with 18 million other Americans, when the filly Ruffian suffered a catastrophic break of her right foreleg and was euthanized hours after a failed surgery. That race was supposed to mean something, she remembered. The "equine battle of the sexes" - in which Ruffian faced off against Foolish Pleasure, a 3-year-old colt who had won the Kentucky Derby that year - was supposed to mirror the classic tennis match in which Billie Jean King beat the braggart Bobby Riggs two years earlier.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | August 25, 2005
Nelsa M. Hodgson, an animal-rights activist who sang with the Baltimore Opera Company chorus for 40 years, died of cancer Aug. 18 at her Timonium home. She was 91. She was born Nelsa Mary Foster in Queens, N.Y., raised in Baltimore and Annapolis, and graduated from Arundel High School in 1931. She worked as a secretary for a Baltimore stock brokerage firm, and from 1950 to 1960, was secretary-treasurer of a family roofing business. A soprano, Mrs. Hodgson sang with the opera chorus from 1940 to 1980.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | September 28, 2004
Animal-rights activists filed a lawsuit yesterday in an effort to stop Maryland's first bear hunt in 51 years. The Fund for Animals and the Humane Society of the United States, both based in Montgomery County, have asked for an injunction to temporarily stop the hunt and for a hearing before Oct. 25, the first day of the season. "People are outraged about this hunt," said Michael Markarian, president of the Fund for Animals. "It runs contrary to the wishes of the public, the wishes of the legislature and statutory mandates.
SPORTS
By Dan Mihalopoulos and Dan Mihalopoulos,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | August 14, 2004
KOROPI, Greece - The Olympics are being contested in baking Mediterranean sunlight, but don't call these the dog days of the Greek summer. Fearful that packs of stray mutts would tarnish the country's image and threaten Olympic visitors, Greek authorities declared the dogs must disappear from the neighborhoods around the sports facilities. That elicited furious howls from many animal rights activists abroad. They complained the order was tantamount to death sentences for hordes of homeless dogs that prowled the streets, alleys and public squares of the Greek capital.
NEWS
By Molly Knight and Molly Knight,SUN STAFF | May 6, 2004
For the past two decades, Charles Blair and his wife, Jane, have come to the Cole Brothers Circus' stop in Annapolis to witness a tradition as old as the circus itself: elephants raising the big top. Yesterday morning, however, the couple -- in their 80s -- watched in confusion as dozens of workers lifted the colossal red tent above the dusty circus grounds at Navy-Marine Corps Memorial Stadium. "I even brought peanuts for the elephants," said Charles Blair, pulling a brown paper bag out of his pocket.
FEATURES
By Vida Roberts and Vida Roberts,SUN FASHION EDITOR | October 23, 1997
No more hiding, no more apologies. Fur has come out of the closet, out of storage and into fashion's good graces.There isn't a glossy magazine on today's newsstands that doesn't feature glamour wraps or bits of fluff in its editorial vision of style. Vogue sees it as a "return to cafe society -- sophisticated urban dressing with a flurry of fur." Mirabella frames fall's glamorous faces with mossy lamb and aqua fox. Elle celebrates "flights of fancy -- fur done as coats or simply as a cheeky bit of trim."
NEWS
By Doug Struck and Doug Struck,Sun Staff Correspondent | June 30, 1991
WISDOM, Mont. -- Bad enough the fur market is glutted, th economy has gone to hell and the price of pelts is hardly worth the trouble of setting his trap lines. Now fur trapper Al Klasen has to worry that some nut wants to murder him. The letter, though short on logic, was pretty explicit:"God does not abide the killing of his creatures. You have precisely two weeks to prepare to die," read the typed note that made its way to him in this town of log houses in the Rocky Mountains this month.
NEWS
March 23, 1997
Teaching kids about trapping animalsI am sure that many people share my sentiments after reading the March 2 story, "New generation of trappers in the hunt," whereby the Department of Natural Resources organized Junior Trapper Day to encourage children as young as 4 or 5 to trap and skin animals.The article repeatedly mentioned that trapping teaches a "respect for nature." True, a DNR biologist told the kids that they are obligated to the animals trapped so that the animals do not suffer.
FEATURES
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,SUN STAFF | March 18, 1996
It's been a long trip - 31 hours from Cincinnati into Baltimore, another nine sitting in the rail yard by the B&O Museum. At last the doors of the silver Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey train slide open and 15 unchained Asian elephants begin stepping carefully down ramps into the morning sunlight in one more city on the circus trail. The animals trumpet, snort, grope the pavement with their trunks as the crew lines them up to march down Pratt Street toward the Baltimore Arena.Folks from the neighborhood are out with their kids and their cameras.
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